Superlative Slider: Katie Koczynski › Introduction to Superlative Slider: Katie Koczynski
Skeleton
Katie Koczynski, Part One
Katie Koczynski, Part Two
Katie Koczynski, Part Three
Katie Koczynski, Part Four
Katie Koczynski, Part Five


Image courtesy © 2005 Torino 2006/LaPresse.
The snow is still falling softly outside as you pull on your second sweatshirt and reach for your coat. You can hardly move through all the padding and layers of clothing. But it will probably come in handy on the hill. As you step out into the crisp, cool air, you see your sled leaning against the garage door. You can hear laughter, shouting and screams of excitement in the distance. Half of the gang is already up there. Soon you'll be flying down the hill with the wind and snow in your face, a little terrified by the combination of speed and slope - but loving every minute of it. It's so much fun, you wish it could be a sport offered at your school. Wouldn't that be great?

Maybe they don't offer sled-related sports in your school, but sliding has been part of the sports world since the early 1800's and continues to be an integral part of the international sports scene today. In fact, there are three sliding sports in the Winter Olympics: bobsleigh, skeleton and luge.

Because of the prone position of the slider (lying face down on the sled, head first with your arms back), skeleton might seem the most like the sort of winter sled fun you have. But, it's a lot more intense - approximately 80 miles per hour intense! Yep, that's right. Eighty miles per hour and your face is just inches from the ice as you barrel down the track.

Let's take a look at how it works.

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