Seed Balls
I. What They Are And How To Make Them

Seed Balls are one half inch diameter models of the living world. They can contain all the seeds for a complete habitat, or a wild or domestic garden. In a holographic way Each ball can contain the whole plant potential of the entire ecosystem. They require a fraction of the cost of planting or drilling and are hundreds of times faster. They can be made by anyone anywhere in the world where there is clay, soil, seed and water. Seed balls work on all scales, small to large, and can be air dropped over broad areas! Hundreds of kinds of mixed seeds, soil humus and dry powdered red clay, form the solid components of seed balls. When mixed with water and rolled into balls, they become little Adobe Gardens.
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Mixing Proportions By Volume
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1 Part : Dry Seeds Mix with all kinds of  desired plants.
3 Parts : Dry Compost with Fungi and Soil Microbes, (plus 10% Natural Repellents).
5 Parts : Dry Red Clay, finely powdered and sifted, not gray or white clay.
* Mix ingredients DRY, turning and sifting to coat seeds with soil, then clay, then add: *
1 to 2 Parts : Water added a little at a time until the clay mix is easily workable.
*Soil and water are the critical lowest common denominators, as they are in conventional agriculture.*
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After thoroughly stirring the seeds in a large flat container, and covering with dry soil humus from compost, dry clay is added and mixed well. In large batches, layer the seed and soil humus combination with clay to insure proper mixing. Water is then gradually added until a firm suitable consistency is reached for rolling clay into half inch diameter balls. Wet clay is pinched off the main mass and rolled between the palms of the hands until smooth and round. A transformation occurs within the balls as they are rolled, and after a few seconds the clay can be felt to set up or organize, as the tiny clay platelets align themselves to each other, and the seeds they enclose. It is important to roll the clay until this polymerization is felt. The balls then dry with structural integrity. Finished seed balls are tossed onto a tarp to harden undisturbed for at least 24 hours. When dry, seed balls may be stored in a cool ventilated place for weeks or immediately applied.
All Photographs And Text Copyright (C) 1996 Jim Bones (Unless Otherwise Indicated) Box 101, Tesuque, N.M. 87574 (505-955-0956)
"Light Writings" http://www.seedballs.com

See "The Seed Ball Story" Video Tape

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