Sweden ranked #1 in men's; Canada #1 in women's, Niittymaki MVP
New 2006 World Rankings

For the first time since this system was introduced after the 2003 World Championship, the IIHF's World Rankings have a new name at the top of the standings. By winning the gold-medal game, Sweden has overtaken Canada as the number-one men's hockey nation. Canada finished 7th in the Olympic tournament. The World Rankings take into account countries' performance over a continuous four-year cycle. The current year (in this case, the Olympics) counts for 100% of total points available, the previous year 75%, two years ago 50%, and three years ago 25%. The maximum points available is 1,200 which is awarded to the champion. Here are the top ten nations on the men's side after the Olympics. The final 2006 ranking will be established following the 70th IIHF World Championship in Riga, Latvia (5 - 21 May).

The number in brackets indicates the final position in the Olympic tournament (incl. the Olympic qualifications). DNP indicates that the country did not participate in neither the Olympic tournament, nor in the Olympic qualifications.

1. Sweden (1) -- 4,030
2. Canada (7) --3,940
3. Czech Republic (3) --3,930
4. Slovakia (5) --3,805
5. Finland (2) -- 3,765
6. Russia (4) -- 3,725
7. USA (8) -- 3,575
8. Switzerland (6) -- 3,525
9. Latvia (12) -- 3,335
10. Germany (10) -- 3,270
11. Kazakhstan (9) -- 3.100
12. Austria (15) -- 3.045
13. Belarus (13) -- 3.035
14. Ukraine (19) -- 3.015
15. Denmark (17) -- 2.990
16. Slovenia (18) -- 2.900
17. Italy (11) -- 2.820
18. Norway (14) -- 2.760
19. France (16) -- 2.755
20. Poland (20) -- 2.635
21. Japan (21) -- 2.625
22. Hungary (22) -- 2.460
23. Netherlands (23) -- 2.400
24. Estonia (25) -- 2.320
25. Romania (24) -- 2.195
26. Lithuania (26) -- 2.085
27. China (27) -- 1.980
28. Croatia (28) -- 1.970
29. Serbia & Montenegro (30) -- 1.815
30. Bulgaria (29) -- 1.655
31. Great Britain (DNP) -- 1.610
32. Korea (DNP) -- 1.360
33. Belgium (DNP) -- 1.255
34. Australia (DNP) -- 1.195
35. Israel (DNP) -- 1.140
36. DPR Korea (DNP) -- 1.105
37. Spain (DNP) -- 1.090
38. New Zealand (DNP) -- 910
39. Iceland (DNP) -- 875
40. South Africa (DNP) -- 845
41. Turkey (DNP) -- 795
42. Luxembourg (DNP) -- 785
43. Mexico (DNP) -- 775
44. Ireland (DNP) -- 455
45. Armenia (DNP) -- 420

For the women, Canada and USA were tied prior to the Olympics, but USA received superior placement because it defeated Canada at last year's World Championship. With the gold medal in Torino, however, Canada regains first place. The top eight women's nations after the Olympics looks as follows. These are final for 2006:

1. Canada (1) -- 2,970
2. USA (3) -- 2,890
3. Sweden (2) -- 2,830
4. Finland (4) -- 2,760
5. Germany (5) -- 2,635
6. Russia (6) -- 2,585
7. China (10) -- 2,485
8. Switzerland (7) -- 2,480
9. Kazakhstan (9) -- 2.445
10. Japan (11) -- 2.350
11. Italy (8) -- 2.015
12. Czech R. (14) -- 2.010
13. Latvia (12) -- 1.995
14. France (13) -- 1.995
15. Norway (15) -- 1.900
16. Slovenia (16) -- 1.700
17. Denmark (DNP) -- 1.070
18. DPR Korea (DNP) -- 1.005
19. Slovakia ((DNP) -- 990
20. Netherlands (DNP) -- 935
21. Austria (DNP) -- 850
22. Great Britain (DNP) -- 885
23. Austrialia (DNP) -- 850
24. Belgium (DNP) -- 830
25. Hungary (DNP) -- 825
26. Korea (DNP) -- 750
27. Romania (DNP) -- 730
28. South Africa (DNP) -- 465
29. New Zealand (DNP) -- 435
30. Iceland (DNP) -- 405

Tournament MVP
--Antero Niittymaki (FIN)

Directorate Awards
Best Goalie--Antero Niittymaki (FIN)
Best Defenceman--Kenny Jonsson (SWE)
Best Forward--Teemu Selanne (FIN)

Media All-Star Team
Goal--Antero Niittymaki (FIN)
Defence--Nicklas Lidstrom (SWE), Kimmo Timonen (FIN)
Forward--Teemu Selanne (FIN), Saku Koivu (FIN), Alexander Ovechkin (RUS)

Triple Gold Club
Nicklas Lidstrom (Olympic gold 2006; Stanley Cup 1997, 1998, 2002; World Championship 1991)
Fredrik Modin (Olympic gold 2006, Stanley Cup 2004, World Championship (1998)

- Andrew Podnieks
IIHF.com Olympic writer