Cuisine

Medium Grain Rice Medium Grain Rice

More than 90% of the rice grown in California consists of medium grain variety. Calrose and "New Variety" are grown in the Sacramento valley which boasts crystal clean water from the Sierras and a Mediterranean climate of warm days and cool nights. Below are the primary medium grain rice varieties and best uses by type, great for first time sushi makers.


Calrose Variety

Description:

  • Grains are soft and stick together
  • Calrose absorbs flavors beautifully
  • Holds together well in soups and salads.

Best Uses:

  • Mediterranean and Asian cuisine such as paella, risotto, pilafs and rice bowls or sushi.
  • Companion dishes to Asian fusion entrĂ©es
  • Spanish-style rice dishes
  • Great for winter soups and summer salads
  • An excellent table rice

Additional Facts:

  • About 85 percent of all California rice is a Calrose variety
  • Most recognized variety in the US and abroad
Premium Medium Grain "New Variety"

Description:

  • Grains remain glossy and upright after cooking
  • Retains its moist texture for longer periods of time
  • New Variety is distinctively sweet and a bit softer and stickier, these characteristics resemble those of a short grain rice (at a more economical price point)

Best Uses:

  • Preferred sushi rice, offers great presence and hold in rolls and nigiri.
  • Great for Asian fusion entrĂ©es that require a flavorful bowl of steamed rice
  • An excellent table rice

Additional Facts:

  • Packaged as "New Variety"
  • Most popular variety used in sushi in the US


Difference Between Borwn and White

Brown rice is milled to retain the rice bran layer, which gives it a nutty flavor and retains more of the vitamins and fiber. White rice is milled to remove the bran layer for a milder taste and texture.