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UCSC General Catalog
Welcome
Introducing UCSC
Fields of Study
Academic Calendar
Undergraduate Admission
Undergraduate Expenses and Financial Resources
Undergraduate Academic Programs
Graduate Studies
Resources for Learning and Research
The Colleges
Student Life
Programs and Courses
Teaching and Administrative Staff
Appendixes
Nondiscrimination Statement

The Colleges


Cowell College | Stevenson College | Crown College | Merrill College | Porter College | Kresge College | Oakes College | College Eight | College Nine | College Ten


The University of California, Santa Cruz, is a collegiate university. All undergraduate students and most faculty are affiliated with one of the colleges, their home within the larger university. All the colleges are committed to fostering a nurturing and academically thriving environment for students of all backgrounds. Each college strives to promote the attributes of a diverse and multicultural community in its own unique way. In order of founding, the colleges are Cowell, Stevenson, Crown, Merrill, Porter, Kresge, Oakes, College Eight, College Nine, and College Ten.

Self-contained and architecturally distinct, each college is a relatively small community of 20 to 90 faculty members and between 750 and 1,550 students, about half of whom live on campus. Each college has its own housing, academic, and recreational facilities, and each is an integral part of the larger campus. The colleges have their own academic emphases and cultural traditions, although each seeks faculty and students from a variety of disciplines to foster broad intellectual interests. The colleges play a primary role in academic advising and are the center of student life. Students graduate from their college. At the same time, all university academic programs, resources, and student services are open to students of every college.

The information students need to rank their college preferences can come from a variety of sources—personal acquaintance, a campus visit, literature available from the colleges, and the descriptions in this section of the catalog. Entering students are asked to list several colleges in order of preference; whenever possible, students are assigned to the college of their choice.

Similarities and Differences
Each college is residential and able to house close to half of its students. Most freshmen choose to live on campus, as do a number of sophomores, juniors, and seniors. The particular style of housing varies among the colleges, ranging from fairly traditional residence halls, with a mix of single, double, and triple rooms, to apartment-style housing, where students live together in small groups and may do some of their own cooking. Faculty, staff, or graduate students, along with undergraduate resident assistants, reside in college housing units.

The faculty, or fellows, of each college come from a variety of academic disciplines. Some of the colleges have faculty from nearly all the liberal arts and sciences, while the faculty in other colleges are more concentrated in particular disciplinary interests. Many faculty have their offices in the colleges.

Each college offers its own distinctive academic program for entering freshmen. Taught in the college during the fall quarter, the required course or seminar provides a significant bridge between academic and residential life, since all freshmen, regardless of major, will be in the course, and most will be in residence as well. Stevenson’s core course extends over three quarters, while the other colleges offer one-quarter courses. College core course requirements for transfer students vary (see the College Requirements section for more information). The colleges also offer selected courses in their area of interdisciplinary emphasis and host events and speakers that enhance this focus.

All the colleges provide academic advising and academic and general campus orientations to help you plan your academic program. In addition, each college has academic preceptors who can provide advice on academic matters. (See Advising: From Course Selection to Careers for further information on academic advising.) Psychological and personal counseling is also available in each college, and many colleges have well-developed peer advising and tutoring.

The colleges differ in architecture; each was planned by a different architect, who was encouraged to convey the distinct personality of that college through the design of its buildings and their placement in the natural environment. Above all, the colleges differ in subtle ways having to do with their intellectual and social traditions, the different designs of their student governments, and the predominant interests of their students and faculty.

Changing Colleges
Most students, having affiliated with a particular college, develop friendships and intellectual attachments there, and they remain members of that college throughout their undergraduate years. Some students find that changing academic interests draw them to a different college. During the specified filing period, students may request a change of college with the approval of both college administrations.

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Cowell College

Cowell College inaugurated the Santa Cruz campus when it opened with a pioneer class of 600 students in 1965. The founding faculty shaped an educational program that challenged and enriched students through wide-ranging inquiry and disciplined study. Today, Cowell has nearly 1,500 affiliated students and 80 faculty fellows. Its motto—The Pursuit of Truth in the Company of Friends— expresses a continuing commitment to create a serious academic environment within a humane and broadly inclusive community. The college is named for the S. H. Cowell Foundation, which endowed the college at its founding.

Academic Emphases

The academic theme of the college encourages students to pursue their general and disciplinary study with attention to the values of liberal arts education: understanding one’s individual perspective by exploration of its historical background and world context. Students affiliated with the college pursue majors from all departments on campus.

The faculty fellows affiliated with the college represent all academic divisions (arts, engineering, humanities, physical and biological sciences, and social sciences). The faculty fellows guide the college academic programs and serve as academic mentors to the students, supplementing the advising provided by the college academic advisers and departmental advising.

In satisfying their general education requirements, first-year Cowell students are required to take the Cowell Core Course in the fall term. The core course (Cowell 80), taught in small seminar sections, seeks to develop critical reading, analytical writing, and seminar discussion skills by reading a selection of classic and contemporary texts. In addition, Cowell students are required to raise their level of proficiency in information technology during their UCSC career.

The college academic buildings house humanities faculty, with notable concentrations in philosophy, classics (study of ancient Greek and Latin language and civilization), and modern foreign languages, especially Chinese, French, Italian, and Japanese. The interdisciplinary faculty group in pre- and early modern studies is centered at Cowell College.

Students who develop ideas for research, creative projects, community service, or internship experiences may apply to the college provost for financial support. The college sponsors prizes for outstanding academic work and acknowledges students who graduate with overall academic excellence in a breadth of study with College Honors.

The college enriches the intellectual and cultural life of the campus by sponsoring events of various kinds: lectures and presentations by local faculty and visiting scholars, theatrical and musical performances, and forums and debates on topics of current interest.

College Community and Facilities

Cowell’s seven residence halls and three apartment buildings are arranged in three quadrangles on a hillside overlooking the city of Santa Cruz and Monterey Bay. About 650 students are housed in the college. Each residence hall houses from 40 to 60 students and is divided into two wings, with seven to 11 residents on each floor. Most floors are coed, with men and women sharing common lounges and other facilities, but single-gender floors are provided for those who prefer this arrangement. Apartments house 185 continuing students in six-person units. The residential staff facilitate diverse educational, social, and recreational programming to enhance the living and learning environment.

Arranged around the college’s central plaza are the dining hall, Page Smith study library, the fireside lounge, the coffee shop, and conference rooms and classrooms. Unique to Cowell College are the Eloise Pickard Smith Gallery, which regularly mounts exhibits, and the Cowell Press, where students can learn the fine techniques of hand printing. The college is also home to a French-speaking living-learning community, Maison Francophone, which studies French-speaking communities around the world and plans events for the college.

Since the college’s founding, regularly scheduled College Nights in the dining hall have offered students, staff, and faculty a special meal and a rich mix of after-dinner programs presented by students and professional artists. Community life is enlivened by many other scheduled and impromptu intellectual, cultural, and social events.

The Student Senate meets weekly to discuss campus issues and student government. The Senate advises the college on the allocation of funds for student activities and programs. Members of the Senate are selected each year by lot, but any student may become a voting member by steady attendance at meetings. The college’s multicultural advisory board works with staff to create a supportive community for students of color affiliated with the college and to increase awareness of the many dimensions of diversity in the community.

For more information on the college, see www2.ucsc.edu/cowell or call (831) 459-2253.

Cowell Faculty and Staff
Provost
STANLEY M. WILLIAMSON Chemistry and Biochemistry, Emeritus (through 12/04)
TYRUS H. MILLER Literature (beginning 1/05)
DEANNA SHEMEK Italian Literature (beginning 1/05)
Fellows

MARGARITA AZMITIA Psychology
KAREN BASSI Classics
JAMES H. BIERMAN Theater Arts (Drama)
DONALD BRENNEIS Anthropology
JEAN P. BRODIE Astronomy and Astrophysics
MARGARET R. BROSE Italian and Comparative Literature
GIULIA CENTINEO Italian Language
SANDRA CHUNG Linguistics
PHILLIP CREWS Chemistry
MARIA (TONIA) DE CHICCHIO Italian Language
JOHN M. DORIS Philosophy
CAROL M. FREEMAN Writing
MARY-KAY GAMEL Classics and Comparative Literature
RAYMOND W. GIBBS JR. Psychology
ROBERT A. GOFF Philosophy
M. VICTORIA GONZÁLEZ-PAGANI Spanish Language
DANIEL GUEVARA Philosophy
GILDAS HAMEL French Language and Classical Studies
ELLEN LOUISE HART Writing
CHARLES W. HEDRICK JR. History
MARGO HENDRICKS Literature
THEODORE HOLMAN Chemistry and Biochemistry
DAVID C. HOY Philosophy
JOCELYN HOY Philosophy
MICHAEL M. HUTCHISON Economics
CHIYOKO ISHIBASHI Japanese Language
VIRGINIA JANSEN History of Art and Visual Culture
GEORGE KANE, Art Cowell Press
KEVIN KARPLUS Computer Engineering
JACQUELINE KU Chinese Language
WILLIAM A. LADUSAW Linguistics
BRUCE D. LARKIN Politics
CAMPBELL LEAPER Psychology
GARY L. LEASE History of Consciousness
THOMAS A. LEHRER American Studies and Mathematics
H. M. LEICESTER JR. English Literature
HERVÉ LE MANSEC French Language
JOHN P. LYNCH Classics
PATRICE L. MAGINNIS Music
GLENN L. MILLHAUSER Chemistry and Biochemistry
JEROME NEU Philosophy
CHARLES L. (LEO) ORTIZ Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
RICHARD E. OTTE Philosophy
DANIEL PALLEROS Chemistry and Biochemistry
GEOFFREY K. PULLUM Linguistics S.
RAVI RAJAN Environmental Studies
FRANK A. RAMÍREZ Spanish Language
BETH REMAK-HONNEF Librarian
ZACK SCHLESINGER Physics
SUSAN Y. SCHWARTZ Earth Sciences
CATHERINE M. SOUSSLOFF History of Art and Visual Culture
ELLEN KAPPY SUCKIEL Philosophy
ANTHONY J. TROMBA Mathematics
PAUL WHITWORTH Theater Arts
JOHN WILKES Science Communication
JAMES WILSON Writing; College Academic Preceptor
Emeriti Fellows

W. EMMANUEL ABRAHAM Philosophy, Emeritus
GEORGE T. AMIS English Literature, Emeritus
HARRY BERGER JR. English Literature and Art History, Emeritus
RALPH J. BERGER Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Emeritus
GABRIEL BERNS Spanish Literature, Emeritus
CHARLES W. DANIEL Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology, Emeritus
JOHN DIZIKES American Studies, Emeritus
ROBERT M. DURLING Italian and English Literature, Emeritus
MIRIAM ELLIS French Language, Emerita
PATRICIA FITCHEN French Language, Emerita
THEODORE FOSTER Marine Sciences, Emeritus
BERT KAPLAN Psychology, Emeritus
S. PAUL KASHAP Philosophy, Emeritus
RICHARD MATHER History, Emeritus
MELANIE J. MAYER Psychology, Emerita
GARY B. MILES History, Emeritus
PEGGY MILES Writing, Emerita
ANDREW TODD NEWBERRY Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Emeritus
DAVID A. ORLANDO French Language, Emeritus
RICHARD R. RANDOLPH Anthropology, Emeritus
AUDREY E. STANLEY Theater Arts, Emerita
THOMAS A. VOGLER English and American Literature, Emeritus
MICHAEL J. WARREN English Literature, Emeritus
College Administrative Officer

JAMES CARTER  
Staff

LISA BIRNEY College Assistant
ANGIE CHRISTMANN College Programs Coordinator
ELIZABETH COWAN Financial/Budget Specialist
DEBRA ELLIS Residential Life Coordinator
OSCAR GUILLEN Senior Building Maintenance Worker
JODI HARVEY Coordinator for Residential Education
KAREN HILKER Programs Assistant
JAY MINERT Coordinator for Residential Education
DAN MONKO Maintenance Supervisor
MARY JAN MURPHY Counseling Psychologist
LINDA POPE Gallery Director
CATHY SHENDER Assistant to Provost and College Administrative Officer/Records Coordinator
STACEY SKETO-ROSENER Academic Preceptor
KARA SNIDER College Programs Coordinator
CAROL SNYDER Coffee Shop Manager
PHIL SPENCER Community Safety Officer
DARIA TROXELL Housing Coordinator
ADRIANNE WAITE Associate College Administrative Officer
LYNNE WOLCOTT Academic Preceptor

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Stevenson College

We are Stevensonians; we are free agents of history and masters of our own destinies. Every one of us is important, and we cherish our differences as much as we cherish our shared values of love, chivalry, honesty, hard work, and responsibility.
   — Seung Kyun Joseph Mok, Stevenson Alumnus/Regents Scholar

Stevenson College is named after former statesman and U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Adlai E. Stevenson. Our faculty, students, and staff take pride in intellectual critical inquiry, academic and civic leadership, and respect for students’ concerns about shared student governance, human rights, and social justice.

Stevenson College has a long-standing reputation for excellence in liberal education. The college strives to provide an academically, culturally, and socially supportive environment for all its members, emphasizing accessibility and fostering social responsibility and academic achievement. Students who seek an interdisciplinary learning environment will appreciate the college’s emphasis on intellectual rigor. As part of the college’s academic and cultural life, the Stevenson Fellows-in-Residence Program has brought to the campus distinguished individuals such as Senator George McGovern, Congresswoman Bella Abzug, Nobel Laureate Elie Wiesel, Chief of the Miwok Tribe Greg Sarris, Producer Lourdes Portillo, the Reverend Jesse Jackson, and Associate Director-Counsel Theodore M. Shaw of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund.

The college’s faculty and academic and administrative staff offer professional and personal service for the diverse needs of students. These individuals, among the most accessible, friendly, and diverse staff at the university, assist students in all areas of their academic and social experience at Stevenson College. Most important, these individuals are committed to instilling respect for the college’s diverse ethnic, racial, religious, and sexual backgrounds.

Academic Emphases

  • Faculty drawn from social sciences, humanities, natural sciences
  • Yearlong frosh writing seminar
  • Tutors and Advisers Program
  • Academic Support Center
  • Junior Fellows Program

Stevenson College distinguishes itself as the only college with a two-quarter frosh seminar intended to provide all first-year students with a common academic experience. The seminar allows for more rigorous development of students’ critical, written, and analytical skills, the fostering of a unique learning environment, and a supportive intellectual community. It is not unusual to find Stevenson alumni in the legal, political, engineering, medical, computer and information sciences, business, and public administration fields.

The faculty at Stevenson, drawn from a variety of disciplines in the social sciences, humanities, and physical and biological sciences, share a common concern for the study of social processes that shape modern society and determine the quality of our individual lives throughout various global regions and periods of world history. Linguistics, sociology, history, politics, psychology, biology, chemistry, and computer science are strongly represented in the college.

Self and Society is intended to provide intellectual and research preparation for students’ future academic endeavors. The seminar addresses the college’s intellectual and pedagogical aims through a holistic inquiry into academic research that explores the question: What is the relationship between “self and society?” In addition, the course fosters an intellectual commitment to the general philosophy which has helped to define Stevenson College since its inception (articulated in the idea of the preservation of human dignity, the social cultivation of individual creativity and citizenship, and a belief in ethical responsibility). The seminar reflects the college’s long-standing commitment to interdisciplinary and culturally diverse readings, while at the same time it affords students an opportunity to develop research interests, to acquire greater understanding of the role of research universities in contemporary societies, and to acquire the requisite skills to engage in increasingly more sophisticated intellectual work while at UCSC.

Because of a conviction on the part of both faculty and students that such a sequence is fundamental to any university education, both quarters are required of all beginning Stevenson students. Students transferring to UCSC with the equivalent of nine courses (45 quarter credits) or more are exempt from the core course.

The Stevenson College Junior Fellows Program offers juniors and seniors an opportunity to serve as teaching and research assistants for Self and Society. Junior fellows, who must have completed outstanding work in Self and Society during their freshman year, undergo a rigorous application and selection process. Junior fellows (enrolled in Stevenson 120, Teaching Practicum) earn 5 course credits.

Stevenson provides writing and math tutoring for all of its students. Stevenson academic tutors are paid student positions open to juniors and seniors with excellent academic records.

College Community

  • College Nights
  • Stevenson Student Council
  • Multicultural Advisory Council
  • Fellows-in-Residence Program
  • Multicultural Programs/Activities

Stevenson holds regular College Nights, when a served dinner presents an opportunity for Stevenson fellows and students to get together in a purely social situation. College Nights—Cinco de Mayo, Chinese New Year, Vietnamese College Night—provide the opportunity to celebrate many different cultures. Dinner is followed by entertainment.

The Stevenson Student Council meets on Thursday evenings. This group of 16 elected representatives (eight resident students, eight living off campus) is responsible for allocating college membership fees to student activities. The council also serves as a forum for the discussion of college and campuswide issues and appoints student representatives to college and campuswide committees.

Facilities

  • Eight small residence halls
  • Three apartment buildings
  • Theme floors: Substance Free, Multicultural
  • Coffee house
  • Wagstaff Fireside Lounge
  • Writers’ Center
  • Stevenson Library
  • Art gallery
  • Silverman Conference Room
  • The Knoll
  • Recreation room

Stevenson College has a wide variety of facilities and activities to appeal to many tastes. The college, designed by San Francisco architect Joseph Esherick, has won many architectural awards. The buildings are situated amid redwood trees and sprawling lawns, and the main quad overlooks Monterey Bay. There are eight small residence houses at the college providing a choice of single-sex or coed floors; each house accommodates about 60 undergraduates. The apartments provide space for 132 continuing students. Nearby are a picnic area, playing fields, and a garden.

The Stevenson Coffee House, which has become the gathering place in the college, is a friendly and inviting spot to enjoy lunch or an espresso and pastry—indoors or out on the patio. It is the scene of lively conversation, occasional musical entertainment, and chess matches. Adjoining the coffee house is a recreational wing, with Ping-Pong, foosball, pool tables, and color television. This area is also the site of much socializing and spontaneous group activity.

In contrast, the Stevenson Library is a striking building designed for quiet reading and study. The Wagstaff Fireside Lounge, a retreat for relaxed discussion, is also used for recitals, special lectures, meetings, and residence house activities. Art exhibits (both student and professional) are on display throughout the year in the lounge, library, and coffee house.

For more information, call (831) 459-4930 or visit the web site: stevenson.ucsc.edu/.

Stevenson Faculty and Staff
Provost
ELLEN KAPPY SUCKIEL Philosophy
Fellows

JUDITH AISSEN Linguistics
ROBERT S. ANDERSON Earth Sciences
DANE ARCHER Sociology
ELLIOT ARONSON Psychology, Emeritus
JONATHAN F. BEECHER History
ILAN BENJAMIN Chemistry and Biochemistry
PETER H. BODENHEIMER Astronomy and Astrophysics
REBECCA BRASLAU Chemistry and Biochemistry
FRANK G. BRIDGES Physics
MONICA CASPER Sociology
MARK CIOC History
CATHERINE R. COOPER Psychology and Education
W. JACKSON DAVIS Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
MICHAEL DINE Physics
G. WILLIAM DOMHOFF Psychology, Emeritus
DONKA FARKAS Linguistics
HIROSHI FUKURAI Sociology
ROBERT E. GARRISON Earth Sciences, Emeritus
MARVIN J. GREENBERG Mathematics, Emeritus
ISEBILL V. GRUHN Politics, Emerita
HOWARD E. HABER Physics
CRAIG W. HANEY Psychology
JORGE HANKAMER Linguistics
DAVID M. HARRINGTON Psychology
AIDA HURTADO Psychology
JUNKO ITÔ Linguistics
MICHAEL KAHN Psychology, Emeritus
GEORGE KANE Art
AL KELLEY Mathematics, Emeritus
PETER KENEZ History
JOHN I. KITSUSE Sociology, Emeritus
KENNETH KLETZER Economics
JOSEPH P. KONOPELSKI Chemistry and Biochemistry
ROBERT P. KRAFT Astronomy and Astrophysics, Emeritus
JEAN H. LANGENHEIM Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Emerita
ROBERT A. LEVINSON Computer Science
DANIEL T. LINGER Anthropology
RONNIE D. LIPSCHUTZ Politics
MARC S. MANGEL Environmental Studies
JAMES MCCLOSKEY Linguistics
DENNIS C. MCELRATH Sociology, Emeritus
R. ARMIN MESTER Linguistics
CARLOS G. NOREÑA Philosophy, Emeritus
JAYE PADGETT Linguistics
THOMAS F. PETTIGREW Psychology, Emeritus
IRA POHL Computer Science
CYNTHIA POLECRITTI History
ANTHONY R. PRATKANIS Psychology
GEOFFREY K. PULLUM Linguistics
RALPH H. QUINN Psychology
DONALD T. SAPOSNEK Psychology
THEODORE R. SARBIN Psychology and Criminology, Emeritus
PETER L. SCOTT Physics, Emeritus
BUCHANAN SHARP History
PRISCILLA W. SHAW English and Comparative Literature, Emerita
WILLIAM F. SHIPLEY Linguistics, Emeritus
GRETA SLOBIN Russian Literature
M. BREWSTER SMITH Psychology, Emeritus
MARSHALL SYLVAN Mathematics, Emeritus
HIROTAKA TAMANOI Mathematics
KIP TÉLLEZ Education
DAVID J. THOMAS Politics Emeritus
BRUCE THOMPSON History
JOHN N. THOMPSON Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
AVRIL THORNE Psychology
MARK TRAUGOTT History
MICHAEL E. URBAN Politics
HOWARD H. WANG Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology
MANFRED K. WARMUTH Computer Science
RICHARD A. WASSERSTROM Philosophy, Emeritus
MARY SUSAN WELDON Psychology
HAROLD WIDOM Mathematics, Emeritus
ZHIWU ZHU Environmental Toxicology
Honorary Fellows

JACK BASKIN  
BORIS KEYSER  
NORMAN LEZIN  
ELEANOR MCGOVERN  
CHARLES NEIDER  
CHARLES H. PAGE  
WILLIAM M. ROTH  
ALMA SIFUENTES  
F. M. GLENN WILLSON

 
Stevenson Fellows-in-Residence

GEORGE MCGOVERN (1982)  
BELLA ABZUG (1983)  
PAUL SARBANES (1983)  
ARTHUR S. FLEMMING (1984)  
CAROLE KING (1985)  
CLARK KERR (1987)  
PETER SHAFFER (1987)  
DONALD MCHENRY (1988)  
PAT CONROY (1990)  
MOCTESUMA ESPARZA (1992)  
LOURDES PORTILLO (1992)  
GREG SARRIS (1997)  
JESSE JACKSON (1998)  
AMIRI BARAKA (1999)  
RON DELLUMS (1999)  
THEODORE M. SHAW (2002)  
College Administrative Officer

JAMES CARTER  
Staff

MARY ALVAREZ Academic Adviser
MARTA ELENA CORONA Counseling Psychologist
ELIZABETH COWAN Financial/Budget Specialist
GREG FLORES Coordinator for Residential Educaction
CANDACE FREIWALD Academic Services Supervisor
JOHN HADLEY Coffee House Manager
RACHEL JABLON Associate College Administrative Officer for Student Life
DAVE LAJOIE Maintenance Officer
KRISTHA LIMA College Programs Coordinator
GUSTAVO NOLAZCO College Assistant/Records Coordinator/Mail Services Supervisor
GABRIEL PEREZ Groundskeeper
JUANITA REYES Housing Coordinator
RALPH RIVERA Assistant College Administrative Officer for Facilities
IMANI RUPERT Assistant College Programs Coordinator
TCHAD SANGER Chief Academic Preceptor
AVA SNYDER Police Sargeant/Liaison
GREGORY SPEED Senior Proctor
MICHELLE TAYLOR Academic Programs Coordinator/Academic Advisor
AMY WEAVER Writing Program Coordinator
SARMA WILLIAMS Coordinator for Residential Education



Crown College

Crown College faculty (the college fellows) and students represent a wide variety of academic disciplines. The majority of fellows are in the physical and biological sciences and the social sciences. There are more science and engineering students at Crown than at any other college. However, the majority of Crown students major in the social sciences, humanities, and arts. This diversity of interests and thinking enriches our intellectual environment.

An important goal of the college is to foster an appreciation for the contributions of diverse cultural groups and to provide an atmosphere in which issues of both diversity and common social purpose are integrated into a wide range of programs and discussions.

From the time of its founding in 1967, issues pertaining to the role of science and technology in society have been a focus of special interest at Crown College. Recently, we have approached these issues from an interdisciplinary perspective that recognizes the influence of social and cultural factors on scientific enterprise, as well as the ways in which science and technology influence society.

Crown is located on a hilltop surrounded by a redwood forest. The core buildings consist of an administration office, dining commons, lounge spaces, recreation facilities, study spaces, faculty offices, and classrooms built around a large patio and central fountain. The award-winning architecture with its white walls and high-pitched tiled roofs suggests a hillside Mediterranean village. The college’s residential facilities are made up of eight traditional residence hall buildings and eight apartment buildings housing approximately 700 students. The facilities at Crown College were built through a partnership of public funds and a gift from the Crown Zellerbach Foundation.

Academic Emphases

Ethical Issues in Emerging Technologies: Transgenics, Clones, Cyborgs, and Artificial Intelligence is an interdisciplinary seminar concerning the effects of these world-changing technologies and encourages students to develop decision-making strategies to ethically steer these technologies. The course examines these debates using a variety of disciplinary approaches that engage the perspectives of both humanists and scientists. The fall-quarter core course is required of all first-year students with fewer than 45 transferable quarter credits. (see the Crown College Course Descriptions section for a full description.)

The Crown-Merrill Science and Technology Learning Community is an innovative program to support first-year students who are interested in pursuing a major in the sciences. Students enrolled in this program live together, forming a supportive community that promotes collaborative learning and group problem solving. To facilitate this process, students are placed in a special section of Chemistry 1A and participate in a residentially based study group. The program is designed especially for students who have a strong interest in the sciences but feel slightly underprepared for university-level course work. It often acts as a bridge to the ACE Program in the physical and biological sciences and engineering (see the Academic Excellence Program section). Participation—limited to first-year students at Crown and Merrill Colleges—requires a commitment to succeed, a willingness to work hard, and a positive attitude.

The Crown Undergraduate Seminar in Science, Technology, and Society provides highly motivated students the opportunity to work closely with ladder-rank research faculty in a small seminar environment. Topics have included California Climate Change: Past, Present, and Future; Food Matters: Science, Technology, and Society; and an honors seminar on introductory computer architecture.

Juniors and seniors can participate in the college’s new Undergraduate Research Fellowship Program, which awards $800 fellowships to student-faculty teams and encourages their interaction through undergraduate research.

College Community and Facilities

Crown sponsors a wide variety of cocurricular events spanning cultural, educational, and social areas of interest. One popular series is the Science/Public Affairs Tables, informal dinners at the Provost’s House that offer students an opportunity to socalize with a faculty member outside the classroom and hear about his or her research.

Students become involved in Crown life by both initiating and participating in a wide range of activities. Social activities vary each year according to the interests of students. At the monthly College Night in the dining commons, a special dinner is followed by entertainment, both often sharing a common cultural theme. Some major events have become traditional. For example: Karaoke College Night; Hypnotist; Crown Formal; and Regression Night. Crown activities and dances draw students from all over campus. Outdoor activities organized by the student government, College Programs Office, or residential staff range from whale watching on the Monterey Bay to atomic bowling, and from backpacking to stargazing.

The Crown Student Senate (CSS), the elected student government at Crown, holds open weekly meetings to recommend fund allocations for student activities and to discuss issues of concern to students and the college. CSS also sponsors events to enhance the college experience, including the very popular pelagic shark lecture and Casino Night.

Crown offers two types of residential facilities: residence halls and apartments. Eight traditional residence halls each house 60 students in single, double, and triple rooms in a coed environment (single-sex bedrooms with unisex bathrooms) or on all-female floors. For students particularly interested in living with and learning about a special-interest environment, Crown provides transfer floors, Substance-Free Houses, and a Science and Technology Learning Community.

In addition, the college has apartments for 230 students above the first-year level. Like the residence halls, the apartments are built on a small scale. Each three-story building has two or three apartments per floor that house four or five students in a combination of single, double, and triple rooms and include a kitchen, living room, dining room, bathroom, and outside deck.

Other facilities in the college include the Crown Library study space; a modern computer laboratory housing Sun workstations, which provides students with access to several kinds of systems and an array of applications and instructional software selected to support academic course work; the Fireside Lounge with widescreen television; the Music Practice Room; and the Crown-Merrill Community Room, which has a television, pool table, foosball, and ping-pong table, and provides an informal place to study, hold meetings, or just visit with friends. Recently renovated dining facilities boast continuous dining, late-night dining, and Banana Joe’s coffee shop.

For general information, call the college assistant at (831) 459-2665 or visit the web site: www2.ucsc.edu/crown/. For residential or college programs information, call the Student Life Office manager at (831) 459-4656.

Crown Faculty and Staff
Provost
F. JOEL FERGUSON Computer Engineering
Fellows

ROBERT F. ADAMS Economics, Emeritus
NAMEERA AKHTAR Psychology
SCOTT BRANDT Computer Science
KENNETH W. BRULAND Ocean Sciences
JOSEPH F. BUNNETT Chemistry and Biochemistry, Emeritus
MAUREEN CALLANAN Psychology
KENNETH L. CAMERON Earth Sciences
SUE A. CARTER Physics
NANCY N. CHEN Anthropology
YIN-WONG CHEUNG Economics
MENZIE CHINN Economics
EUGENE H. COTA-ROBLES Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology, Emeritus
MARGARET L. DELANEY Ocean Sciences
CHONGYING DONG Mathematics
MICHAEL P. DOOLEY Economics
WILLIAM T. DOYLE Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Emeritus
E. MELANIE DUPUIS Sociology
ROBERT S. EDGAR Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology, Emeritus
ÓLÖF EINARSDÓTTIR Chemistry and Biochemistry
JOHN M. ELLIS German Literature, Emeritus
SANDRA M. FABER Astronomy and Astrophysics
JOHN FAULKNER Astronomy and Astrophysics
JERRY F. FELDMAN Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology
ANTHONY L. FINK Chemistry and Biochemistry
ARTHUR E. FISCHER Mathematics
TIMOTHY FITZMAURICE Writing
STANLEY M. FLATTÉ Physics, Emeritus A.
RUSSELL FLEGAL Environmental Toxicology
LAUREL R. FOX Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
MARIA CECILIA FREEMAN Writing
DANIEL FRIEDMAN Economics
KWOK-CHIU FUNG Economics
ALISON GALLOWAY Anthropology
J. J. GARCÍA-LUNA-ACEVES Computer Engineering
LYNDA J. GOFF Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
RONALD E. GRIESON Economics
JUDITH A. HABICHT-MAUCHE Anthropology
DAVID HAUSSLER Computer Science
RALPH T. HINEGARDNER Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Emeritus
RICHARD P. HUGHEY Computer Engineering
HAROLD A. HYDE Vice Chancellor, Emeritus
GARTH D. ILLINGWORTH Astronomy and Astrophysics
BURTON F. JONES Astronomy and Astrophysics
DAVID E. KAUN Economics
ALAN H. KAWAMOTO Psychology
PAUL L. KOCH Earth Sciences
JONATHAN M. KRUPP Biology; Coordinator, Microscopy and Imaging Laboratory
EDWARD M. LANDESMAN Mathematics, Emeritus
JEAN H. LANGENHEIM Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Emerita
LÉO F. LAPORTE Earth Sciences, Emeritus
BURNEY J. LE BOEUF Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Emeritus
MAX M. LEVIN Psychology, Emeritus
DEBRA LEWIS Mathematics
DOUGLAS N. C. LIN Astronomy and Astrophysics
DARRELL D. E. LONG Information Systems Management
ROBERT A. LUDWIG Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology
PHILLIP MCCALMAN Economics
MARGARET MCMANUS Ocean Sciences
JACOB B. MICHAELSEN Economics, Emeritus
ETHAN MILLER Computer Science
JOSEPH S. MILLER Astronomy and Astrophysics
RICHARD MONTGOMERY Mathematics
J. CASEY MOORE Earth Sciences
JUDIT N. MOSCHKOVICH Education
RICHARD MURPHY German Literature
PEGGY B. MUSGRAVE Economics, Emerita
RICHARD A. MUSGRAVE Economics, Retired
MICHAEL NAUENBERG Physics, Emeritus
HARRY F. NOLLER Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology
LOISA NYGAARD German Literature
DONALD E. OSTERBROCK Astronomy and Astrophysics, Emeritus
KAREN OTTEMANN Environmental Toxicology
TRILOKI N. PANDEY Anthropology
GRANT H. POGSON Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
DONALD C. POTTS Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
JOEL R. PRIMACK Physics JIE QING, Mathematics
TUDOR S. RATIU Mathematics, Emeritus
GERTRUD REUTTER German Language, Emerita
GERHARD RINGEL Mathematics, Emeritus
HARTMUT F.-W. SADROZINSKI Physics
THOMAS W. SCHLEICH Chemistry and Biochemistry
MARIA SCHONBEK Mathematics
JUDITH A. SCOTT Education
ABRAHAM SEIDEN Physics
ELI A. SILVER Earth Sciences
JANE SILVERTHORNE Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology, Emerita
NIRVIKAR SINGH Economics
LISA C. SLOAN Earth Sciences
DONALD R. SMITH Environmental Toxicology
WILLIAM T. SULLIVAN Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology
DAVID SWANGER Education and Creative Writing
EUGENE SWITKES Chemistry and Biochemistry
KIP TÉLLEZ Education  
ROLAND G. THARP Education and Psychology, Emeritus
STEPHEN E. THORSETT Astronomy and Astrophysics
JOHN F. VESECKY Electrical Engineering
STEVEN S. VOGT Astronomy and Astrophysics
CARL E. WALSH Economics
MANFRED K. WARMUTH Computer Science
GERALD E. WEBER Earth Sciences, Emeritus
W. TODD WIPKE Chemistry and Biochemistry
STANFORD E. WOOSLEY Astronomy and Astrophysics
FITNAT YILDIZ Environmental Toxicology
A. PETER YOUNG Physics
JAMES ZACHOS Earth Sciences
JIN Z. ZHANG Chemistry and Biochemistry
Honorary Fellows

SANDY LYDON  
ROBERT L. SINSHEIMER  
VIVIAN (MRS. IVAN) VALLIER

 
College Administrative Officer

ALEX REVELES

 
Staff

MARIA ACOSTA-SMITH Senior Academic Preceptor
CHRIS ATTIAS Assistant College Administrative Officer for Facilities and Grounds
ALEXANDRA BELISARIO Associate College Administrative Officer for Student Life
CINDY BLAKE Groundskeeper
MIKE BOYADJIAN Payroll/Personnel Coordinator
BRENDA BROWN Academic Preceptor
SCOTT BURGESS Coordinator for Residential Education
ALLEN BUSHNELL Special Projects Coordinator
DARLENE DENNY Groundskeeper
SERENA DIONYSUS College Programs Coordinator
BEN DONIACH Senior Building Maintenance Worker
SALLY GAYNOR Academic Programs and Development Coordinator
ORIN HUTCHINSON Facilities Specialist
JEANNE JOHNSON Advising and Records Coordinator
WAYNE KENNEY Senior Proctor Supervisor
CHERIE KILLIAN Financial Assistant
JERRY LEE Counseling Psychologist
DARLENE MIYAKAWA Housing Coordinator
ANDREW PARK College Assistant
SARAH ROGERSON Academic Adviser
JOAO SIMAS Student Life Office Manager/Assistant
JAMES SMITH Coordinator for Residential Education
BRIAN STEVENS Coordinator for Residential Education
JOANIE WEBBER Financial Coordinator

 

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Merrill College

Merrill College seeks to expand its students’ awareness of their own heritage and of the diversity of cultures around the world, past and present. Drawn largely from history as well as the social sciences, literature, and foreign languages, many Merrill faculty specialize in social theory, international affairs, and social change. The college makes a special effort to be a home for students from different cultural backgrounds and for international students; it presents unusual opportunities to those who value multicultural perspectives. Merrill is a center for Spanish language and Latin American and Latino studies and has been active in sponsoring American Indian cultural and academic activities.

Academic Emphases

Merrill College has as its theme Cultural Identities and Global Consciousness. In Merrill’s core course, with this same title, students read books by Alexie, Hayslip, Hochschild, Hurston, Rodriguez, and Isbister. These histories, novels, and autobiographies increase students’ awareness of cultural and ethnic diversity and of women’s concerns in different cultural settings. More specifically, these volumes deepen students’ appreciation of the complexities involved in cultural struggles for the right to live, with respect, in peace and harmony in one’s own community. In addition, the course presents the crisis of world poverty and proposes theoretical solutions, while also investigating the fundamental international forces of imperialism and nationalism. (For the course description, see the Merrill College Course Descriptions section) Transfer students with fewer than 45 transferable quarter credits are required to take the core course.

Merrill is in the seventh year of its Freshman Scholars Program, in which students take a course together in each of the three quarters: a section of the core course in the fall, a seminar on “First Peoples” (Indigenous cultures) in the winter, and a seminar on ethics in the spring. Interested high school seniors apply by writing directly to the Merrill provost, after admission.

Now in its third year, the winter Merrill American Indian Colloquium Series hosts public and class presentations by noted American Indian professionals and cultural practitioners, from a variety of tribes and pursuits.

Merrill also sponsors a variety of 2- and 5- credit courses on topics that change from year to year, recently ranging from the benefits of reevaluation counseling, to personal empowerment, to white racial identity in a multicultural society. All are kept to a size that facilitates discussion, and many are designed for first-year students. In addition, students can participate in a variety of service-learning opportunities in the surrounding community. Students may volunteer in local elementary school classrooms, mentor high school students, help in an adult literacy program, or work in a Santa Cruz Public Library–sponsored project, assisting children from migrant camps to compile their family stories for publication.

Recognizing the increasingly rigorous requirements for science majors, Merrill—in collaboration with Crown—has developed the Science and Technology Learning Community, to support students majoring in the sciences. Students participating in the program live in close proximity to each other and are encouraged to develop a collaborative learning approach.

Merrill is the home of Casa Latina, which houses the Latin American and Latino Studies Department, the Chicano/Latino Research Center, La Galería, and the CineMedia Project. The Ming Ong Computer Center houses 40 modern personal computers; there is also a new wireless computing zone with laptop computer checkout.

Merrill serves as the administrative home for the Departments of History and Politics, in addition to Latin American and Latino Studies. Merrill is also the home of a Peace Corps Satellite Office. The office helps the many UCSC students who are interested in working overseas with the Peace Corps after graduation.

College Community and Facilities

Located on a hilltop, Merrill’s dramatic and award-winning buildings thread upward through the edge of a redwood forest. The brick patios, gardens, outdoor café, and mission bell tower suggest California’s Latino heritage, while the striking architecture of the residence halls is modern.

Merrill has four residence halls offering students both coed and single-sex floors. Two high-rise structures house 361 students, and two smaller buildings provide housing for about 70 students. In the residence halls, small groups of about 14 students share common bathroom and lounge facilities. Residents eat their meals in the Crown-Merrill Dining Hall.

Apartments, which are located a short distance from the central part of the college, house 160 continuing Merrill students. Grouped amid winding pathways and redwood trees, these three-story buildings have three apartments per floor. Each apartment houses six students and comes fully equipped with kitchen and bath, large living area, and outside deck. Facilities at the apartment complex include common lounges, a large multipurpose room, and a laundry room.

With the help of the Merrill coordinators for residential education, an enthusiastic residential staff plans recreational activities that include potluck dinners, intramural sports competitions, dances, musical events, film series, and a yearly outdoor mural-painting party. Many of these social and residential activities focus on building a multicultural community. Informal discussions, to which faculty are invited, take place throughout the year. In addition to the dining hall, the college has an attractive outdoor/ indoor taqueria. For the artistically inclined, Merrill is the only college which has a student-run pottery co-op. Students can throw, fire, and glaze their works in the workshop space, which is open to Merrill students on a first-come first-served basis. The entire college is online electronically. Students can bring computers from home and connect directly into the Internet from their rooms without the use of a modem.

The physical facilities of Merrill College were provided through a partnership of public funds and gifts from the Charles E. Merrill Trust and the family of Ming Ong. Charles E. Merrill also funds the Chicano Scholarship Program, which makes awards to promising high school and junior college students entering Merrill. Other Merrill scholarships include the Joel Frankel Fund, which supports students pursuing fieldwork in Latin America.

For more information, call (831) 459-2144 or visit the web site: www2.ucsc.edu/merrill/.

Merrill Faculty and Staff
Provost
JOHN M. SCHECHTER Music
Fellows
JORGE ALADRO FONT Spanish Literature
SONIA E. ALVAREZ Politics
FRANK C. ANDREWS Chemistry and Biochemistry
GABRIELA ARREDONDO Latin American and Latino Studies
NORIKO ASO History
BRENDA BARCELÓ Spanish Language
DILIP K. BASU History
ROBERT F. BERKHOFER JR. History, Emeritus
CLAUDE F. BERNASCONI Chemistry and Biochemistry
JOHN G. BORREGO Latin American and Latino Studies
MICHAEL K. BROWN Politics
WAYNE B. BRUMBACH Physical Education, Emeritus
EDMUND BURKE III History
JULIANNE BURTON-CARVAJAL Literature
CARLOS CALIERNO Spanish Language
MAX CAMARILLO Counseling and Psychological Services
BENJAMIN CARSON Music
PEDRO G. CASTILLO History
ALAN S. CHRISTY History
RENA V. COCHLIN, Physical Education
GUILLERMO DELGADO-P. Latin American and Latino Studies
JOSHUA M. DEUTSCH Physics
MARÍA ELENA DIAZ History
MAY N. DIAZ Anthropology, Emerita
BERNARD L. ELBAUM Economics
JEREMY ELKINS Legal Studies and Politics
JONATHAN FOX Latin American and Latino Studies
DANA FRANK History
ROSA
LINDA FREGOSO
Latin American and Latino Studies
WILLIAM H. FRIEDLAND Community Studies and Sociology, Emeritus
HARDY T. FRYE Sociology
MARGARET (GRETA) A. GIBSON Education
DIANE P. GIFFORD-GONZALEZ Anthropology
WALTER L. GOLDFRANK Sociology
MARÍA VICTORIA GONZÁLEZ-PAGANI Spanish Language
M. LISBETH HAAS History
JUDITH HARRIS-FRISK German Language and Core Course
ELLEN LOUISE HART Writing
GAIL B. HERSHATTER History
KARLTON E. HESTER Music
JOHN W. ISBISTER Economics
ROBERT P. JOHNSON Physics
SUSANNE JONAS Latin American and Latino Studies
NOEL Q. KING History and Comparative Religion, Emeritus
NORMA KLAHN Latin American Literature
LORI G. KLETZER Economics
GARY L. LEASE History of Consciousness
PAUL M. LUBECK Sociology
PATRICK E. MANTEY Computer Engineering
LOURDES MARTÍNEZ-ECHAZÁBAL Latin American Literature
DEAN MATHIOWETZ Politics
MARIA EUGENIA MATUTE-BIANCHI Education, Emerita
BARRY MCLAUGHLIN Psychology, Emeritus
MARTA MORELLO-FROSCH Literature, Emerita
MARIA MORRIS Spanish Language
OLGA NÁJERA-RAMÍREZ Anthropology
ELLEN NEWBERRY Writing
ALEX T. PANG Computer Science
SHERRI PARIS Writing
SARAH-HOPE PARMETER Writing
MANUEL PASTOR JR. Latin American and Latino Studies
JUAN POBLETE Literature
CLIFTON A. POODRY Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology, Emeritus
ALAN R. RICHARDS Economics
PAMELA A. ROBY Sociology
STUART A. SCHLEGEL Anthropology, Emeritus
ANA MARIA SEARA Portuguese Language
BAKTHAN SINGARAM Chemistry and Biochemistry
GRAEME H. SMITH Astronomy and Astrophysics
DAVID G. SWEET History, Emeritus
MEGAN THOMAS Politics
LARRY TRUJILLO Community Studies
GEORGE E. VON DER MUHLL Politics, Emeritus
MARILYN J. WESTERKAMP History
DANIEL J. WIRLS Politics
DONALD A. WITTMAN Economics
ALICE YANG MURRAY History
PATRICIA ZAVELLA Latin American and Latino Studies
MARTHA C. ZÚÑIGA
Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology
Honorary Fellows

ZINA JACQUE  
CLARK KERR (deceased)  
JOHN LAIRD  
ALICE LYTLE  
CHARLES E. MERRILL JR.  
JOHN VASCONCELLOS YORI WADA  
REV. CECIL WILLIAMS  
MARDI WORMHOUDT

 
Class Honorary Fellows

ROBERT TAYLOR, 1991, 1992, 1993  
LEILANI FARM, 1994  
MICHAEL PAUL WONG, 1995  
DAVID SILVERA, 1996  
ZIESEL SAUNDERS, 1997  
VICTOR HERNANDEZ, 1998  
MARÍA MATA, 1999  
WENDY BAXTER, 2000  
LARRY TRUJILLO, 2001  
GINA DIAZ, 2002  
MARIA MATA, 2003

 
College Administrative Officer

ALEX REVELES

 
Staff

 
REBECCA AGUIRRE-GARCIA Coordinator for Residential Education
GABRIELA ALANIZ College Assistant
THAIS BOUCHEREAU Coordinator for Residential Education
MICHAEL BOYADJIAN Payroll/Personnel Assistant
ALLEN BUSHNELL Special Projects Coordinator
VALERIE CHASE Associate College Administrative Officer
CONNIE CREEL Provost’s Assistant
CHERIE KILIAN Financial Assistant
EDDIE LOMBOY Coordinator for Residential Education
MARÍA MATA Academic Adviser
MARILYN MCGRATH Groundskeeper
SARAH ROGERSON Academic Preceptor
PATRICIA SANDERS Faculty Services
JOHN SHAY Maintenance Supervisor
GARY SHOEMAKER Psychologist
MARTIN SMITH Activities Assistant
SILAS SNYDER Maintenance Assistant
ERIC SUMMERS Housing Coordinator
CURTIS SWAIN Community Safety Officer
LYNDA TANAKA College Programs Coordinator
TOM TURRENTINE Community Service Coordinator
SHARON VAN KIRK Senior Academic Preceptor
JOANIE WEBBER Financial Coordinator
JENYA WILLIAMS Peace Corps Coordinator

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Porter College

The Porter College theme, Arts in a Multicultural Society, reflects the consensus among Porter College fellows that the creative process is an inseparable aspect of a broad-minded and rigorous education. The seminars, cocurricular activities, and cultural environment at Porter encourage creativity in all fields—from composition, to community studies, to computer programming.

Academic Emphases

Porter’s faculty includes most of the campus’s practicing artists and art scholars, though some of the college’s faculty (and half of its students) specialize in the humanities or in the physical and biological or social sciences. The college is the administrative home of the Division of the Arts and the History of Art and Visual Culture Department. The Institute for Humanities Research also has offices here.

The Porter core course (see the Porter College Course Descriptions section) focuses on arts in a multicultural society, with concentration on literature and arts of California and the Pacific Rim. Students who enter the college with fewer than 30 quarter credits (or the equivalent) are required to participate in the core course. Students meet with their faculty member in a seminar, attend regular lecture/performances, and participate in writing groups, advising, and other sessions that introduce some of the academic issues they will confront at the university. The course emphasizes critical reading, writing, and close intellectual contact with faculty and other students.

In their second quarter of residency, students are encouraged to take the next course in the core sequence, which focuses on ways of knowing. Students are introduced to the ways in which different disciplines define “literacy” in their own terms: visual literacy, musical literacy, and the scientific method will be introduced as alternative ways of understanding.

The college also offers 2-credit courses in a variety of areas connected to the arts. These are small classes in the practice or theory of the arts; they may include investigation of a particular style of music or dance, visits to Bay Area theaters and museums, working in the arts, or creation of a show in one of the college galleries. These diverse offerings allow Porter students to understand the significance of creativity in a university education.

In addition to faculty advising, writing assistants have regular office hours in the college to offer help to on- and off-campus students. Special lectures give students the opportunity to meet with important artists and thinkers in an informal environment.

The college provides fellowship funds each year to talented students pursuing original research and creative projects.

College Community and Facilities

The residence halls play an important role in bringing the college community together. Students are encouraged to spend their beginning years in residence in the college, where housing is available for 610 students. The residence halls are divided into smaller units, with from 14 to 40 students sharing common lounges and other facilities. Theme halls include Performing Arts, Film and Digital Media, Visual Arts, and Outdoors Experiences. Porter students have established a Multicultural Lounge, a Lavender Lounge, and a Women’s Hall, with affiliating student organizations offering thematic support. Students also have a choice of smokefree or substance-free halls.

In addition to traditional classrooms, Porter has many specialized facilities such as a fireside lounge, darkroom, galleries, and a dining hall that converts to a theater space.

Instructional Computing Laboratories, located at Porter College, consist of two high-end labs oriented toward the arts (see the Arts Instructional Computing Laboratories section). Porter also has a Study Center with an adjoining Computer Lab for Porter students only. This lab has six workstations for word processing, graphics production, Internet capabilities, and printing.

Adjacent to the college are the campus’s Theater Arts Center (see the Theater Arts Program Description section), the Elena Baskin Visual Arts Center (see the Art Program Description section), and the Music Center (see the Music Program Description section).

Porter provides constructive opportunities for relaxation and recreation to balance the intellectual demands of a university education. The Student Activities Office, in conjunction with the Porter Student Senate, organizes formal and informal events, including dances, recreational activities, and field trips, which augment campuswide activities in these areas. For relaxing, Porter students and faculty gather at the college’s coffeehouse—the Hungry Slug.

Many students and faculty perform or exhibit their work at Porter, and cultural events are a constant feature of life at the college. The dining commons has been the site of performances by artists such as El Teatro Campesino, readings by contemporary authors such as Andrew X. Pham and Alice McGrath, and speakers such as Auschwitz survivor Renee Firestone.

Porter College facilities were constructed through a partnership of public funds and a gift from the Porter-Sesnon family of Santa Cruz. Part of the gift was used to establish an endowment for the college.

For more information, call (831) 459-2273 or visit the web site: www2.ucsc.edu/porter.

Porter Faculty and Staff
Provost
DAVID EVAN JONES Music
Fellows

ELIZABETH S. ABRAMS Writing
KEN ALLEY Art
ELLIOT ANDERSON Art
ROGER W. ANDERSON Chemistry and Biochemistry
LAWRENCE ANDREWS Film and Digital Media
MANUEL ARES JR. Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology
DORIS ASH Education
CHARLES ATKINSON Writing
AMY C. BEAL Music
TANDY BEAL Theater Arts
JAMES H. BIERMAN Theater Arts
ROBERTO A. BOGOMOLNI Chemistry and Biochemistry
JOYCE BRODSKY Art
GEORGE BROWN Physics
LINDA BURMAN-HALL Music
ELISABETH CAMERON History of Art and Visual Culture
BENJAMIN CARSON Music
MARTIN M. CHEMERS Psychology
ROBERT S. COE Earth Sciences
RAY T. COLLETT UCSC Arboretum, Emeritus
DAVID H. COPE Music
WILLIAM D. COULTER Music
DONALD COYNE Physics
DAVID CRANE Film and Digital Media
E. G. CRICHTON Art
FAYE J. CROSBY Psychology
DAVID CUTHBERT Theater Arts
SHARON DANIEL Film and Digital Media
CAROLYN S. DEAN History of Art and Visual Culture
SHERWOOD DUDLEY Music, Emeritus
PETER Q. ELSEA Music
HARLAND W. EPPS Astronomy and Astrophysics
SHELLY E. ERRINGTON Anthropology
MARIA V. EZEROVA Music
M. KATHLEEN FOLEY Theater Arts
DOYLE FOREMAN Art, Emeritus
JEAN FOX TREE Psycholinguistics
MARK FRANKO Theater Arts
SUSAN FRIEDMAN Art
GREGORY FRITSCH Theater Arts
FRANK GALUSZKA Art
INGEBORG GERDES Art
ROBERT GIGES Core Course
JENNIFER A. GONZÁLEZ History of Art and Visual Culture
IRENE GUSTAFSON Film and Digital Media
MELISSA GWYN Art
JAMES B. HALL Literature, Emeritus
SUSAN HARDING Anthropology
AMELIE HASTIE Film and Digital Media
JOHN HAY History of Art and Visual Culture
IRENE HERRMANN Music
KARLTON HESTER Music
CLEMENS A. HEUSCH Physics
ELI E. HOLLANDER Film and Digital Media
EDWARD F. HOUGHTON Music
DONNA HUNTER History of Art and Visual Culture
KIMBERLY JANNARONE Theater Arts
HI KYUNG KIM Music
L. S. KIM Film and Digital Media
CONSTANCE KREEMER Theater Arts
THORNE LAY Earth Sciences
JIMIN LEE Art
ANATOLE LEIKIN Music
FREDRIC LIEBERMAN Music
PETER LIMBRICK Film amd Digital Media
NORMAN LOCKS Art
SURESH LODHA Computer Science
CHARLES (CHIP) L. LORD Film and Digital Media
PAVEL MACHOTKA Psychology, Emeritus
DOMINIC W. MASSARO Psychology
WILLIAM G. MATHEWS Astronomy and Astrophysics
JENNIE LIND MCDADE Art
CHARLES E. MCDOWELL Computer Science
LETA E. MILLER Music
MARGARET MORSE Film and Digital Media
PETER MOSKTOFF Theater Arts
PAUL NAUERT Music
NICOLE A. PAIEMENT Music
JENNIFER PARKER Art
KENNETH PEDROTTI Electrical Engineering
PAUL RANGELL Art
BARBARA ROGOFF Psychology and Education
ELAINE YOKOYAMA ROOS Theater Arts
NORVID J. ROOS Theater Arts, Emeritus
BRUCE ROSENBLUM Physics
WARREN SACK Film and Digital Media
JOHN M. SCHECHTER Music
CATHERINE M. SOUSSLOFF History of Art and Visual Culture
SHELLEY STAMP Film and Digital Media
AUDREY E. STANLEY Theater Arts, Emerita
BRIAN J. STAUFENBIEL Music
ELIZABETH STEPHENS Art
UNDANG SUMARNA Music
DAVID SWANGER Education and Creative Writing
JOHN W. TAMKUN Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology
OTHMAR T. TOBISCH Earth Sciences, Emeritus
JUDITH TODD Writing
ANDREY TODOROV Mathematics
ALLEN VAN GELDER Computer Science
LEWIS WATTS Art
C. GORDON WELLS Education
LINDA WERNER Computer Science
JAMES WHITEHEAD Computer Science
PAUL WHITWORTH Theater Arts
JANE P. WILHELMS Computer Science
QUENTIN C. WILLIAMS Earth Sciences
MEL WONG

Theater Arts
College Administrative Officer

MICHAEL YAMAUCHI-GLEASON

 
Staff

SUSAN J. BEACH Assistant to the Provost
DEBORAH BELVILLE Academic Preceptor
JANICE COCKREN Academic Preceptor
KATHY COONEY Assistant College Administrative Officer for Student Life
EUGENE ERVIN Relief Proctor
ROBERT GIGES Academic Preceptor
MEGAN GNEKOW Housing Coordinator
WAYNE HENDRICKSON Senior Night Proctor
DEVA HYMEN College Programs Coordinator
RYAN JONES Coordinator for Residential Education
CECILIA KERRIDGE College Receptionist
KALIN MCGRAW Coordinator for Residential Education
TODD J. MCGREGOR Assistant College Administrative Officer for Student Life
JESSE RODRIGUEZ Maintenance Assistant
JENNIFER SIECIENSKI Coordinator for Residential Education
MARY SPAFFORD College Academic Adviser
STEVE STRICKLEY Groundskeeper
DAVID SULSER Maintenance Supervisor
PAULA TRUJILLO Financial Coordinator

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Kresge College

Kresge is an experience that will allow you to learn a lot about yourself, be independent and learn to take responsibility for yourself.
— Yvette Keller, Psychology and Modern Literature (double major)

Academic Emphases

Kresge faculty are primarily from the humanities, but they include anthropologists, artists, writers, dramatists, journalists, and political theorists. The college houses the Departments of Literature and Women’s Studies, the Writing Program, the journalism minor, and the Dickens Project.

Kresge’s core course, Power and Representation (see the Kresge College Course Descriptions section), invites active participation in the creation of new social possibilities. The Kresge core course is an examination of key moments at the middle and end of the 20th century. The class focuses on Hiroshima and the dawn of the atomic age; and the social movements of the late 1950s, 1960s, and early 1970s, including civil rights, the Vietnam War, the women’s movement, and the gay and lesbian movement. Each instructor has a special two-week period to examine topics the instuctor is well versed in, and which reflect the overall focus of the core curriculum. The last part of the course deals with the economic downturn of the 1990s. In addition to section meetings, on several nights all students come together to watch core-related films or listen to lectures.

The core course is a time where as a first-year student, you have a small class where your voice counts. It is a place to challenge your ideas and the way you think about things [by] introducing new ideas in a very open atmosphere that is safe and comfortable.
— Angela Phipps, Literature

The core course seeks to open avenues to new ways of thinking and to various academic disciplines at the university, as it integrates the student’s intellectual, social, and personal lives in a stimulating and supportive environment. The core course develops critical writing and thinking skills that prepare students for the rapidly changing multicultural world of the year 2000 and beyond. Special sections of the core course are designed specifically for transfer students, who can enroll in this course as an elective. These sections emphasize the same issues and skills development within a context that explores a transfer student’s particular concerns on entering the university.

In addition to the core course, Kresge offers a series of courses taught by faculty affiliated with the college. These courses give students a chance to study in small groups with faculty on topics close to faculty research interests and provide training in skills helpful to students as they begin their majors. A new array of classes is offered each year. Some of the courses in the past have been taught by senior faculty in mathematics, anthropology, history, literature, and journalism.

Advising

Academic advising at Kresge is done by two professional academic advisers and staff through a well-developed peer advising system that is designed to support four-year undergraduate programs as well as the concerns of transfer students. Student peer advisers, writing tutors, and a mathematics computer tutor offer students extensive individual academic guidance and support as a resource provided by the college without additional charge.

I see a lot of new frosh and new transfer students who aren’t sure about where the process starts. I can talk with them and together we can solve their problems and suddenly the university doesn’t seem so big.
— Kevin Tresham, Politics; Student Peer Adviser

Residential Life

Kresge was the sixth college to be built on the UCSC campus. The college was founded on the principle of participatory democracy as a means of encouraging a strong sense of community. Architecturally renowned, Kresge has apartments rather than residence halls.

The Kresge apartments attract students with a strong sense of independence and community participation. Distinctively designed, the apartments are configured for four or seven people. Kitchen and living areas look out onto the street, with other rooms facing the surrounding redwood forest. At Kresge East, apartments are folded into the forest for greater quiet. These apartments with four single bedrooms are typically reserved for continuing upper-division students.

The residential life staff at Kresge work to bring students of similar interests and diverse backgrounds together academically and socially by designing special programming based on student interest. The programs focus on celebrating the diversity of the residential community, on multicultural community-building, and on enhancing academic success, through film series, music events, career and graduate school advising, mural painting, food-centered events, field trips, and other creative programming ideas.

[Living at Kresge] takes a person who is confident with who they are . . . someone who is independent. You cook your own meals, live in a house environment with others who don’t necessarily share the same view as you. It is a lot of work, but it has a big payoff. The people I lived with are still my best friends today.
— Samantha Vincent, Psychology

Community Life

There are a wide variety of events and activities at the college that shape community life: Lectures, workshops, trips, plays, dances, concerts, and films are a regular part of student life at the college. The nature and tenor of these events are a reflection of the interests and dedication of students and staff, who are committed to providing voice and opportunity for all community members.

Students actively shape the college community through participation in Kresge Parliament, an openly structured student organization responsible for voting the allocation of all college membership fees in support of activities and events. Parliament and monthly Town Meetings also serve as a forum for the discussion of college and campuswide issues with college staff and faculty.

Transfer Students
In recognition of the wealth of diversity that transfer students bring to the community—in terms of culture and experience—Kresge is the home of the Transfer Center for campuswide transfer students regardless of college affiliation. This is a staffed facility where students can gather to relax, socialize, hold meetings, and obtain campus information and resource support in a central location. The resource center offers workshops, social evenings, and special events that are tailored to meet the needs of transfer students.

Kresge has provided a place for me, as a transfer student, where my questions and concerns have been addressed. As a Peer Adviser, it has become my commitment to work with the Kresge community to provide students with an environment where they can experience the richness of university life.
— Julie Taylor, Literature; Chancellor’s Undergraduate Internship Program

Kresge also offers special advising workshops and 2- and 3-credit courses designed to help transfers in the process of entering the university and moving forward in their careers from here.

Facilities

Kresge’s unique style is also evident in its physical structures. At the entrance to the college is the restful Piazetta with its “un-fountain.” Spinning off from the Piazetta are the Transfer Center, the Commuter Lounge, and the Student Lounge, equipped with television and VCR. In addition to the Transfer Center, as a unique facility on the campus, the Commuter Lounge is a place for off-campus students who want to use a kitchen, shower, or lockers while on campus. The Photo Lab Co-op is above the Piazetta and offers 24-hour accessibility to darkroom equipment. Adjacent to the nearby meadow are the Recreation Room, a racquetball court, and an outdoor basketball court. The center of the college includes the beautiful Study Center with its soaring ceilings and walls of glass overlooking the forest. College facilities include a computer lab equipped with PCs for student use. Kresge also has the student-run Food Co-op, where healthful and organic produce is sold and working memberships are available. At the top of the college are the Town Hall performance facility, the Music Co-op, and a restaurant.

If people are looking for an atmosphere that is accepting to different personalities and mind frames, and want the independence to work with other students, Kresge offers that. Kresge really strives to have a community of people, but leaves space to assert your independence.
   — Diem Do, Community Studies

For more information, call (831) 459-2071 or visit the web site: www2.ucsc.edu/kresge.

Kresge Faculty and Staff
Provost
PAUL N. SKENAZY American Literature
Members

RALPH H. ABRAHAM Mathematics, Emeritus
BETTINA APTHEKER Women’s Studies and History
MURRAY BAUMGARTEN English and Comparative Literature
RAOUL BIRNBAUM History of Art and Visual Culture
TINA CAMPT Women’s Studies
SHELLY E. ERRINGTON Anthropology
J. PETER EUBEN Politics, Emeritus
MARGE FRANTZ American Studies and Women’s Studies, Emerita
CARLA FRECCERO Literature
PASCALE GAITET French Literature and Language
JODY GREENE English Literature
CONN HALLINAN Journalism, Retired
HENRY R. HILGARD Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology, Emeritus
EMILY HONIG Women’s Studies and History
AKASHA HULL Women’s Studies and Literature, Emerita
EARL JACKSON JR. Japanese Literature
JOHN O. JORDAN English Literature
ELISE KNITTLE Earth Sciences
DIANE K. LEWIS Anthropology, Emerita
NATHANIEL E. MACKEY 20th-Century Literature, Afro-American Literature, Creative Writing
MARY KAY MARTIN Writing, Emerita
ALMA MARTÍNEZ Theater Arts
CAROLYN MARTIN SHAW Anthropology
GEOFFREY MASON Mathematics
KAREN C. MCNALLY Earth Sciences, Emerita
ROBERT L. MEISTER Politics
HELENE MOGLEN English Literature
MADELINE MOORE English Literature, Emerita
LISA ROFEL Anthropology
MATTHEW SANDS Physics, Emeritus
JOHN H. SCHAAR Politics, Emeritus
DANNY SCHEIE Theater Arts
RICHARD TERDIMAN Literature
DANNY SCHEIE Theater Arts
ANNA TSING Anthropology
KAREN TEI YAMASHITA

Literature
College Administrative Officer

MICHAEL YAMAUCHI-GLEASON

 
Staff

JIMMY BROWN Community Safety Officer
CAROLYN CRANDALL Academic Preceptor
VIRGINIA FITZMAURICE Special Assistant to the College Administrative Officer
ANGELA GALINDO Receptionist
BARBARA LEE Services to Academic Staff Assistant
ANNE MANOR-HILEY Advising and Records Coordinator
ROBIN MCDUFF Maintenance Supervisor
IAN MITCHELL Maintenance Assistant
MOLLY O’BRIEN College Programs Coordinator
CLAUDIA PARRISH Transfer Center Coordinator
CHARLES PERRY Coordinator for Residential Education
DARIEN RICE Groundskeeper
KAREN ROSEWOOD HOOPER Associate College Administrative Officer
PEG SHEMARIA Counseling Psychologist
MARY SIERRA Financial Coordinator
JULIE TAYLOR Academic Preceptor
THAIS THOMPSON Housing Coordinator
BETSY WOOTTEN Services to Academic Staff Supervisor
MINDY YANINEK Assistant to the Provost

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Oakes College

Oakes was founded in 1972 to provide high-quality education to students from diverse cultural and social backgrounds. Students, staff, and faculty associated with the college believe that learning takes place not only in the classroom but also in residential settings. For that reason, they work hard to create a multicultural community whose members strive together toward certain universal goals—including equal access to educational opportunity and freedom from oppression—while simultaneously affirming and celebrating some of the distinctive aspects of the different backgrounds from which they come.

Academic Emphases

Oakes faculty members represent a variety of disciplines in the humanities, social sciences, and physical and biological sciences. Since its founding, Oakes has made a special effort to provide academic programs and experiences for underrepresented groups, including women. These programs and experiences are enriched by the presence of core faculty from disciplines housed in the college: American studies, American literature, writing, world literature, and history of consciousness. Oakes graduates have gone on to successful careers in fields such as medicine, law, education, medical research, and community service.

The Oakes core course, Values and Change in a Diverse Society, is required of all first-year students. The course is writing intensive and examines individual and collective responses to issues of culture, gender, sexuality, race, and class. (See the Oakes College Course Descriptions section for a description of the course.) Transfer students with fewer than 45 transferable quarter credits are required to take the core course.

Students at Oakes are challenged in many ways. Not only do they have the opportunity to live and work with people from different backgrounds, but they are also expected to demonstrate academic excellence in their chosen fields of study. To enable all students to do well— regardless of their level of high school preparation —a variety of services are available:

  • The Learning Center at Oakes College offers a study center as well as tutoring and advising. Special assistance in writing and tutoring in a variety of subjects are offered to Oakes students and EOP students.
  • The Oakes Computer Lab provides access to 20 PC computers for Oakes students.
  • Oakes Community Service provides students with information about and assistance in making contact with a wide variety of community service organizations. All Oakes students are encouraged to contribute service to public agencies, schools, and community organizations in the city of Santa Cruz and in economically deprived areas of Santa Cruz and Monterey Counties. Oakes students serve as tutors, teachers, mentors, and community builders. Academic credit is available through the Oakes Community Service course.
  • Academic and psychological counselors work with students to help them overcome obstacles to learning and realize their full potential.

College Community and Facilities

Oakes College, located on the west side of the UCSC campus, commands a sweeping view of Monterey Bay. Students may choose between apartment and residence hall living. The residence halls have lounges on each floor, attractive courtyards, and views of the ocean and the city of Santa Cruz. The college’s residence halls and apartments are arranged into “blocks.” Five students share an apartment, along with the responsibilities for maintaining it and cooking their own meals. Residence halls are coed and provide space for students in double and single rooms. Rest-room facilities for each gender are located on each floor.

Full-time coordinators for residential education and neighborhood assistants help residents develop cooperative ways of living together. As one student put it, “Oakes is a community where people of many different colors, backgrounds, interests, and goals form a friendly neighborhood. We share our cultures and adapt to the different lifestyles of our neighbors.” The residential program is designed to assist all students in integrating their academic and social needs. The residential staff hosts activities such as brunches, study breaks, and block dinners, each with a different theme and often reflecting the various cultures represented by Oakes students. Other events include once-a-month College Night programs in the dining hall, weekend videos, TGIFs, celebrations of cultural traditions such as Kwanzaa and Dia de los Muertos, an annual Harvest Dinner for the Oakes community, a Valentine’s Day party, and a spring block party.

The college staff seeks to nurture and sustain a community in which mutual respect, understanding, and concern for others are the norm. Within that atmosphere of community expectations, students are also supported and encouraged to find room for their own creative personal expression.

The other physical facilities at Oakes further support the special programs of the college and provide recreational opportunities for the students. College facilities include the Learning Center, administered by the Academic Resources Center, with computers and seminar rooms; a multipurpose room for lectures, movies, and small theater productions; a college library; a lounge used for college dinners and meetings; a dining facility shared with College Eight; TV lounges in the residences and adjacent to the coffee shop; and a small basketball court, the “Underdome.” Additional recreational facilities located close to the college include tennis courts, a large soccer field, and an indoor basketball court.

A grant from the San Francisco Foundation —from Roscoe and Margaret Oakes Foundation funds—was used in partnership with public funds for the construction of Oakes. Part of the grant was used to establish an endowed fund for the college.

For further information, call (831) 459-2558 or visit the web site: oakes.ucsc.edu.

Oakes Faculty and Staff
Provost
PEDRO G. CASTILLO History
Fellows

DAVID H. ANTHONY III History
GEORGE R. BLUMENTHAL Astronomy and Astrophysics
BARRY BOWMAN Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology
VICTOR BURGIN History of Consciousness, Emeritus
MAX CAMARILLO Counseling and Psychological Services
JAMES T. CLIFFORD History of Consciousness
CHRISTOPHER CONNERY Chinese Literature
MICHAEL H. COWAN Literature and American Studies
ANGELA Y. DAVIS History of Consciousness
TERESA DE LAURETIS History of Consciousness
DAVID E. DORFAN Physics
BARBARA L. EPSTEIN History of Consciousness
JAMES B. GILL Earth Sciences
SUSAN GILLMAN American Literature
KIRSTEN GRUESZ Literature
DONNA J. HARAWAY History of Consciousness
YVETTE HUGINNIE American Studies
SHARON KINOSHITA Literature and Language Studies
DAVID S. KLIGER Chemistry and Biochemistry
ANN M. LANE American Studies
DIANE K. LEWIS Anthropology, Emerita
GEORGE LIPSITZ American Studies
PRADIP K. MASCHARAK Chemistry and Biochemistry
ERIC PORTER American Studies
CATHERINE RAMIREZ American Studies
RENYA RAMIREZ American Studies
A. CHRISTINA RAVELO Ocean Sciences
FORREST G. ROBINSON American Studies
TRICIA ROSE American Studies
DONALD L. ROTHMAN Writing
DANIEL SELDEN Literature
MARY W. SILVER Ocean Sciences
NEFERTI TADIAR History of Consciousness
FRANK J. TALAMANTES Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology
HAYDEN WHITE History of Consciousness, Emeritus
ROB WILSON Literature
STEPHEN C. WRIGHT Psychology
JUDY YUNG American Studies
ADRIENNE L. ZIHLMAN
Anthropology
Honorary Associates

J. HERMAN BLAKE  
BRUCE N. COOPERSTEIN  
DAVID DODSON  
ALLEN B. FIELDS  
DOLORES HUERTA  
ELBA R. SÁNCHEZ

 
College Administrative Officer

SUSAN WELTE

 
Staff

MICHAEL BARTEE Counseling Psychologist
CHER BERGEON Academic Preceptor
IRA BEYAH Relief Proctor
ANTOINE BRACY Coordinator for Residential Education
LOWELL BURTON Maintenance Supervisor
THOMAS CASEY Community Service Coordinator
TERRY COHELAN Senior Maintenance Assistant
STEPHANIE COULTER Assistant to Provost and to College Administrative Officer
KATHY DURCAN Academic Services Assistant
BILL HEINRICH Coordinator for Residential Education
ELAINE KIHARA Academic Preceptor
ROBIN KIRKSEY Financial Coordinator
C. J. LESLIE Groundskeeper
ADRIANA LOPEZ Coordinator for Residential Education
GWENDOLYN MATHIEU Housing Coordinator
LAURA MCSHANE Academic Services Assistant
MARIE MORONES College Assistant
EMILIO NAVARRO Maintenance Assistant
OSIRIS ORTIZ College Programs Assistant
MARI ORTIZ-MCGUIRE Associate College Administrative Officer
KELLI RIGGS College Programs Coordinator
PEGGY ROSE EOP Academic Counselor
PATTI TRAUGOTT Advising and Records Coordinator
NICK YUKICH Senior Proctor

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College Eight

The theme of College Eight—Environment and Society—is concern for social, political, scientific, and ethical issues, recognizing the essential interconnections among human beings and between humans and all other forms of life. College Eight faculty are drawn primarily from the Environmental Studies, Sociology, and Community Studies Departments, but also include faculty from other disciplines, such as Biology, Computer Engineering, Computer Science, Earth Sciences, Mathematics, Physics, and Psychology.

The students who come to College Eight bring with them a wide variety of life, work, and educational experiences. They represent all the disciplines in their choices of major. They also represent a rich diversity of cultural backgrounds. A large number of transfer students attend College Eight and tend to have a clear sense of their educational and professional objectives. For first-year students, the college fosters an exciting, interdisciplinary intellectual atmosphere in which to explore their academic interests and potential. This mix of ages and backgrounds creates a refreshingly easy fellowship among faculty, staff, and students.

Academic Emphases

The College Eight core course, Environment and Society, examines different perspectives on environment and community in the contemporary world. (See the College Eight Course Descriptions section for the course description.) Through a series of lectures, films, readings, and small-group discussions, the course provides an opportunity for first-year students to study issues of vital importance, to share their diverse backgrounds, cultural heritage, and points of view. The course, which is required of all first-year students, features guidance and practice in the critical reading and writing skills necessary for successful study at the university level.

College Eight students and faculty are encouraged to develop courses, conferences, and field projects. Internships and field studies offer an opportunity to link classroom theory with action in the community.

College Community and Facilities

College Eight is located on a sunny, terraced hillside on the west side of the UCSC campus, a site that offers a spectacular view of Monterey Bay and the California coastline. The college is designed to encourage interaction among resident and commuter students, faculty, and staff. Outdoor spaces allow for relaxing, informal opportunities to converse and socialize; they include small residence hall patios, grass quadrangles, and a large plaza—the heart of the college —where pedestrian traffic converges. Adjacent to the college are recreational facilities including the West Field House, tennis courts, basketball and sand volleyball courts, and playing fields. The Theater Arts and Music Centers, McHenry Library, and Porter and Oakes Colleges are a short distance from the college.

College Eight’s facilities include an academic building that accommodates the college office, the Sociology and Community Studies Departments and associated research centers, a computer lab with printers, five classrooms, and faculty offices.

Approximately 390 students live in a community of two- and three-story residence halls with single and double rooms and suites. The residence halls include designated study lounges, laundry facilities, and lobbies that serve as living rooms—favorite places where residents gather to relax, watch television, and catch up on the news of the day. Another 260 students are housed in College Eight’s two-, three-, and four-bedroom apartments, which are generally reserved for students at the sophomore level and above.

The college’s enthusiastic residential staff is composed of coordinators for residential education, who are full-time live-in professionals, along with undergraduate resident assistants. The residential staff plans a variety of educational and recreational events including community barbecues, outdoor movies, and a quarterly cultural festival celebrating the diversity of our community. More intimate gatherings include study breaks, coffee talks, brunches, and potlucks. The residential staff is available to ease the transition to college life, making the college a comfortable new home for our residents.

The Student Commons building contains the office of College Eight’s college programs coordinator as well as two conference rooms and a study center for student use. The lively College Eight Café features a pool table and a quiet, comfortable corner with couches. The café is a favorite haven and gathering place for students, faculty, staff, and other members of the campus community.

The College Eight Student Programs Office, in conjunction with the student government and student organizations, plans social, multicultural, and educational events for the college community. Weekly Café Nights—featuring open mikes, music, art shows, and guest speakers —accommodate the diverse spectra of cultural and artistic interests of the students. College Night, a monthly cultural event, provides an opportunity for students to learn about a variety of cultures through entertainment and delicious cuisine. In addition, the College Eight Student Programs Office works closely with the Student Environmental Center to bring programs that educate and build long-lasting networks, which aim to address the environmental issues affecting our world today.

Above all, College Eight seeks to create a community of inclusion, in which each person is encouraged to share and explore beliefs, worldviews, values, and ideas in an atmosphere of mutual support and trust.

For more information, contact the college at (831) 459-2361, e-mail 8housing@ucsc.edu or crmeusel@ucsc.edu, or visit the web site: www2.ucsc.edu/eight/.

College Eight Faculty and Staff
Provost
ROSWELL (ROZ) SPAFFORD Writing
Fellows

JENNIFER K. ANDERSON Environmental Studies
DAVID P. BELANGER Physics
JULIE BETTIE Sociology
JOHN G. BORREGO Latin American and Latino Studies
BRUCE BRIDGEMAN Psychology
DAVID T. BRUNDAGE Community Studies
MONICA J. CASPER Sociology
BRUCE N. COOPERSTEIN Mathematics
DANIEL P. COSTA Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
BEN CROW Sociology
ROBERT R. CURRY Environmental Studies, Emeritus
DANIEL F. DOAK Environmental Studies
BRYAN H. FARRELL Environmental Studies, Emeritus
F. JOEL FERGUSON Computer Engineering
ANDREW FISHER Earth Sciences
WILLIAM H. FRIEDLAND Community Studies and Sociology, Emeritus
HIROSHI FUKURAI Sociology
MARGARET H. FUSARI Environmental Studies; Natural Reserve Director
JOAQUÍN GARCÍA-LUNA Computer Engineering
VIKTOR GINZBURG Mathematics
STEPHEN R. GLIESSMAN Environmental Studies
WALTER L. GOLDFRANK Sociology
DAVID GOODMAN Environmental Studies
GARY B. GRIGGS Earth Sciences; Director, Institute of Marine Sciences
BRENT HADDAD Environmental Studies
DAVID P. HELMBOLD Computer Science
PHOKION G. KOLAITIS Computer Science
DAVID C. KOO Astronomy and Astrophysics
TRACY LARRABEE Computer Engineering
DEBORAH LETOURNEAU Environmental Studies
PAUL M. LUBECK Sociology
PATRICK MCKERCHER Writing
PAUL NIEBANCK Environmental Planning, Emeritus
JAMES R. O’CONNOR Sociology, Emeritus
ART PEARL Education, Emeritus
JOHN S. PEARSE Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Emeritus
JAMES E. PEPPER Environmental Planning, Emeritus
DANIEL M. PRESS Environmental Studies
MARY BETH PUDUP Community Studies
PETER T. RAIMONDI Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
DAVID M. RANK Astronomy and Astrophysics, Emeritus
CRAIG REINARMAN Sociology
MICHAEL ROTKIN Community Studies
MARTINE D. F. SCHLAG Computer Engineering
DANIEL SCRIPTURE Writing
MICHAEL SOULÉ Environmental Studies, Emeritus
NANCY STOLLER Community Studies
ANDREW SZASZ Sociology
ANUJAN VARMA Computer Engineering
CANDACE WEST Sociology
TERRIE M. WILLIAMS Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
DEBORAH A. WOO Community Studies Affiliate Fellows
WILLIAM JACKSON (JACK) DAVIS Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
SYLVIA JENKINS Music
BURNEY LE BOEUF Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Emeritus
JOEL R. PRIMACK Physics
BRIAN WALTON

Environmental Studies; Coordinator, Predatory Bird Research Group
College Administrative Officer

SUSAN WELTE

 
Staff

DAVID BARRY Senior Proctor
THERESA BEASLEY Housing Coordinator
PAUL BIANCHINI Facilities/Maintenance Supervisor
JAN BURROUGHS Academic Preceptor
JODY CROCE Café Manager
TRAVIS DOUGLAS Coordinator for Residential Education
WENDY GITTINGS Café Assistant Manager
HEIDI LEWIN College Programs Coordinator
SANDRA LORD-CRAIG Financial Coordinator
MARY MCKINNON Associate College Administrative Officer
CHARLES MEUSEL College Assistant
A. PATRICE MONSOUR Counseling Psychologist
LAUREN REED Academic Preceptor
SARA WALSH Assistant to the Provost and Coordinator of Advising and Records
NATE WESTRUP Coordinator for Residential Education
PAUL WILLIS Coordinator for Residential Education
BALDO ZARAGOZA Maintenance Assistant

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College Nine

At College Nine, we introduce students to our increasingly interconnected world. Students can learn about the impact of economic globalization. We also expect them to come to appreciate the diversity of cultural traditions.
   — Campbell Leaper, College Nine Provost

Academic Emphases

College Nine’s theme of International and Global Perspectives emphasizes the importance of both diversity and unity in understanding individuals and societies. The academic and cocurricular programs are designed to explore the wide diversity found in the world based on people’s economic opportunities, political power, and cultural traditions. At the same time, we consider how people across the world are becoming interconnected through global economies, education, mass media, jet travel, and computers. Students interested in these issues either as their major focus or as part of their general education are invited to join the College Nine community.

Writing Seminar

In the first-quarter frosh course, International and Global Perspectives: A Writing and Discussion Seminar (see the College Nine Course Descriptions section), students examine current issues pertinent to the college’s intellectual theme. Topics address issues such as globalization, inequities in wealth and poverty across the world, human rights, and regional conflicts.

The seminar emphasizes the development of students’ writing skills. Being able to write well is a valuable asset for success in college and later in most careers. Students write several reflective and analytical papers during the quarter. Each paper undergoes at least one revision after the student receives constructive feedback from the instructor. Thus, the instructors work closely with each student throughout the quarter.

Special Academic Programs

Optional programs are available to involve College Nine students in academic and cocurricular activities beyond the first-quarter course. They are designed to promote students’ academic achievement and success by connecting them with faculty mentors and helping them pursue leadership experiences in particular contexts.

Exploring A World of Possibilities Workshop
College Nine students have the option of enrolling in Exploring A World of Possibilities Workshop. This 2-credit course meets once per week and can be taken in addition to the regular 15-credit academic load. The workshop emphasizes small-group experiential learning. Students examine social, cultural, political, and environmental issues. These explorations involve examining one’s own life experiences and identity development in relation to multicultural and global perspectives. The course includes discussions, group activities, film presentations, and guest speakers.

Service Learning
Students can extend their learning beyond the classroom by getting practical experience and course credit working as an intern for a community or business organization. This type of practical experience is known as service learning or field study. Examples include assisting in a classroom or at a homeless shelter. College Nine has its own service-learning program. In addition, there are a variety of service-learning programs in the academic Departments in the social sciences, including Community Studies, Environmental Studies, Sociology, Economics, Latin American and Latino Studies, and Psychology. Whether through their major or College Nine, students enrolled in one of these programs work with both a field supervisor and a faculty sponsor. The field supervisor guides the student at the practicum site, while the faculty sponsor helps the student develop a reading list and paper topic related to the placement. The College Nine advisers will help direct students to possible practicum programs at the college or in academic departments.

Students as Teachers and Mentors

College Nine students have special opportunities to become course assistants, tutors, and student mentors. By enrolling in Teaching a World of Possibilities, students gain independent experience as teachers leading their own discussion sections of a College Nine course. They receive close supervision that emphasizes a collaborative approach to developing and enhancing teaching, communication, and leadership skills. The College Nine academic advisers can also direct students to other opportunities for student-teaching and peer-mentoring programs on campus. These are excellent opportunities to work closely with a faculty member and to develop one’s own skills as a teacher and a leader.

Education Abroad
The UC Education Abroad Program (see Education Abroad Program section) places students at a university in another country for one or more quarters. Studying abroad can be a valuable way to expand one’s understanding of the world. Given the international focus at College Nine, students are encouraged (but not required) to develop a second language or to study abroad.

Global Information Internship Program
The Global Information Internship Program (GIIP) places highly motivated students— trained in social science and information technology —in internships with nongovernmental organizations and community groups. Students in GIIP help these organizations and groups in the use of Internet-based information and communications technologies. Interns acquire leadership and organizational skills through the “learning-by-doing” method. For more information, see the Global Information Internship Program section and visit the web site at www2.ucsc.edu/giip/.

Research Opportunities
The faculty at UC Santa Cruz are ranked high in their quality of research. College Nine students are encouraged to take advantage of the many excellent opportunities available to work closely with faculty as research apprentices. Students will find many internship, independent study, or senior thesis programs in the departments of most majors. The College Nine academic advisers will help link students with these programs. College Nine students will also have connections to faculty affiliated with various research institutes concerned with international and global issues. They include the following:

  • The Center for Agroecology & Sustainable Food Systems (go here for more information)
  • The Center for Global, International and Regional Studies (go here for more information)
  • The Center for Justice, Tolerance, and Community (go here for more information)
  • The Chicano/Latino Research Center (go here for more information)
  • The Santa Cruz Center for International Economics (go here for more information)

College Nine Scholars Program
Eligible College Nine frosh may apply to the Scholars Program. This includes enrolling in an honors section of the frosh writing seminar in the fall quarter, the 2-credit workshop in the winter, and a special seminar in the spring.

College Nine Pathways to Distinction
Another feature of College Nine is that qualified students may graduate with College Nine Distinction. This recognition is intended to serve as an incentive for students to pursue activities that are especially apt to help them succeed in college and beyond. Two pathways are possible:

Research and scholarship. In this pathway, students pursue research with faculty by completing three quarters (15 credits) of work on a senior thesis or a research internship. Students may be recognized with College Nine Distinction if they do a thesis or a research internship in their major on a topic related to international or global issues.

Language and culture.
Students who enroll in at least three quarters (15 credits) in either Education Abroad or a foreign language (or a combination) may qualify for College Nine Distinction.

College Community and Facilities

Founded in fall 2000, College Nine is one of the newest colleges at UCSC. Consistent with UCSC’s founding vision, College Nine creates an integrated living and learning environment through engaging academic and extracurricular programs. The college motto, “Celebrating A World of Possibilities,” describes exciting cocurricular opportunities to learn more about the world in which we live.

Theme Programming
The College Nine theme of International and Global Perspectives forms a central foundation of our programming. Each month, students and staff work together to develop programs and provide opportunities to learn about and enjoy different aspects of the world around us. Festivals of food and dance, hands-on arts programs, faculty presentations, field trips, film series, and other programs are offered. Some past programs have included European Craft Workshop, Exploring Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine, Rhythm and Soul Food Café, and Field Trips to Chinatown, Japantown, and the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco.

College Nights
Each month, the college community comes together to plan a College Night, which is a large-scale community celebration, held in the dining commons and open to all College Nine students whether or not they live on campus. These events are planned by students and focus on particular regions of the world. College Nights include food, entertainment, and educational materials related to the theme. Some past College Nights have been Winter Holidays from Around the World, Carnival, and Asian Traditions.

Intercultural Communication Retreat
This two-day retreat provides international and American students from diverse backgrounds the opportunity to explore various components of intercultural communication. Through a series of structured exercises and small-group discussions, students share perspectives on issues such as multiculturalism, values orientation, and diversity. The goal of the workshop is to build community and friendship among international and American students as well as to increase students’ understanding of the complexity of communicating across cultures. The Intercultural Communication Retreat is optional; students apply for this opportunity in the fall.

International Living Center
The International Living Center (ILC) at College Nine offers a unique living environment fostering understanding, cooperation, and friendship among upper-division students from different nations, cultures, and backgrounds. Half of the residents are students from the United States, and the other half are students from various countries around the world. Students reside in the College Nine Apartments.

Model United Nations
Students have the opportunity to explore a multitude of international issues through interactive methods that include role playing, a mock UN session, and faculty presentations.

Intergroup Dialogue
Through this program, students are given opportunities to learn, experience, and work constructively with one another through structured dialogues and experimental activities across social-group boundaries and through social conflict. The Intergroup Dialogue program initiates links between formal academic course work and students’ individual experiences of intergroup conflict and relations.

CREATE
CREATE (Cultural Resources to Educate and to Empower) offers a community at College Nine for students of color to find support and empowerment through mentorship and friendship.

Rainbow Club
The Rainbow Club provides opportunities for gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, intersex, queer, and questioning students and their allies to join together for self-awareness and social activities in a fun, relaxed atmosphere.

Fall Leadership Institute
Student leadership and involvement are key to successfully building the new College Nine community. The Fall Leadership Institute offers students the opportunity to develop leadership skills and to develop efficacy as world citizens and leaders at College Nine. The institute meets weekly throughout fall quarter, providing a wide range of exercises, guest speakers, discussions, and debates.

Other Cocurricular Opportunities
Getting involved in cocurricular activities is a predictor of college success. Not only do college activities help students make friends, they foster leadership and group cooperation skills. There are many opportunities at College Nine for student involvement, including the College Nine Student Government Association and Programming International Events (PIE). These organizations are responsible for many of the programs previously described. Additionally, there are social and recreational programs such as dances, ski trips, and intramural sports. There are also specialized groups such as Cloud Nine (the a cappella singing group) and the Book Club.

Physical Surroundings
College Nine is situated in a redwood grove next to the Social Sciences 1 and 2 Buildings near the heart of campus. Peabody’s Coffee Cart, located on the ground floor of Social Sciences 2, serves espresso drinks, pastries, and sandwiches. Also, one of the campus’s Instructional Computing Labs is conveniently located in the Social Sciences 2 Building.

A nature preserve serves as College Nine’s “backyard.” College Nine students have immediate access to hiking, running, and mountain bike trails in the adjacent forest.

Newly constructed residence halls with 400 single and double bedrooms opened in fall 2002. These fully furnished residence halls include student lounges, recreational spaces, and Internet connections. In addition, a state-of- the-art dining hall with an adjoining game room and student lounge for both Colleges Nine and Ten opened in fall 2002.

Colleges Nine and Ten also house approximately 300 upper-division students in newly 90 CAMPUS LIFE constructed apartments, with 190 students in single bedrooms and the balance in double and triple rooms. All apartments have full kitchens, living rooms, bathrooms, and Internet connections. Ground-floor apartments have decks, and most upper apartments have private balconies.

For more information about academic or general college programs, call (831) 459-5034, e-mail dslater@ucsc.edu, or visit the web site: collegenine.ucsc.edu.

College Nine Faculty and Staff
Provost
CAMPBELL LEAPER* Division of Social Sciences; Psychology
Fellows
Charter Fellows*
JOSHUA AIZENMAN* Economics
DILIP BASU* History
DONALD BRENNEIS* Anthropology
EILEEN BROOKS* Economics
EDMUND BURKE III* History
NANCY CHEN* Anthropology
WEIXIN CHENG* Environmental Studies
MARK CIOC* History
ANNETTE CLEAR* Politics
CATHERINE R. COOPER* Psychology and Education
BEN CROW* Sociology
JONATHAN A. FOX* Latin American and Latino Studies
K. C. FUNG* Economics
MARGARET (GRETA) A. GIBSON* Education and Anthropology
PER F. GJERDE* Psychology
STEPHEN R. GLIESSMAN* Environmental Studies
WALTER L. GOLDFRANK* Sociology
JUNE A. GORDON* Education
ISEBILL V. GRUHN* Politics
JULIE GUTHMAN Community Studies
MICHAEL M. HUTCHISON* Division of Social Sciences; Economics
DAVID E. KAUN* Economics
KENNETH KLETZER* Economics
DANIEL T. LINGER* Anthropology
RONNIE D. LIPSCHUTZ* Politics
SURESH LODHA* Computer Science
PAUL M. LUBECK* Sociology
JAYE PADGETT* Linguistics
HUGH RAFFLES* Anthropology
HELEN SHAPIRO* Sociology
JEROME SHAW Education
NIRVIKAR SINGH* Economics
MICHAEL E. URBAN* Politics
CARTER WILSON*

Community Studies, Emeritus
College Administrative Officer

DEANA SLATER

 
Staff

ABBEY ASHER Special Projects Coordinator
RACHEL BAUMAN Associate College Administrative Officer
WENDY BAXTER Manager of Cocurricular Programs
NANCY CHA Coordinator of Residential Education
OLIVIA CHAN Assistant to the Provost
NIDI CHANANI Assistant College Programs Coordinator
JANE HARTMAN Assistant to the Provost and the College Administrative Officer
AMY HYLER-ESSIG Housing Coordinator
JAY JOHNSON Proctor
AUDREY KIM Psychologist
VICTOR KIMURA Financial Analyst
MARCIA LEVITSKY Academic Adviser
MATT LOZANO Housing Assistant
ED MACHADO Proctor
ANDREA MONROE Manager of Cocurricular Programs
SIMON O’SHEA Coordinator of Residential Education, International Living Center
ERIN RAMSDEN Cocurricular Programs Coordinator
BRETT RIALE Senior Building Maintenance Supervisor
CYNTHIA WELLE Coordinator of Residential Education
SARAH WOODSIDE College Programs Coordinator


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College Ten

Our goal at College Ten is to foster students’ concerns for social justice and their respect for diversity. This appreciation develops through both understanding and practice. Students can study the roots of social problems such as prejudice, ethnic hatreds, poverty, and political oppression. Another form of learning can occur through involvement in community organizations and other agencies. In these ways, we hope our students can contribute to the makings of a better world.
— Campbell Leaper, College Ten Provost

Academic Emphases

College Ten’s theme of Social Justice and Community addresses a range of social problems and their impact on all members of society. In particular, the academic and cocurricular programs consider the injustices that many people confront in their lives. Possible community and governmental policies for addressing social, political, and economic inequalities are also examined. In addition, the college provides students with opportunities to make their own positive contributions to social change through community involvement or scholarly research.

The college curriculum will explore the causes and consequences of social injustice in several ways. Students will examine the roots of prejudice, discrimination, and violence directed toward groups based on their ethnicity, skin color, gender, sexual orientation, religious beliefs, or political views. They will also consider the causes and consequences of poverty both within the United States and across the world.

Writing Seminar

In the first-quarter frosh course, Social Justice and Community: A Writing and Discussion Seminar (see the College Ten Course Descriptions section), students examine current issues pertinent to the college’s intellectual theme. Topics address issues such as poverty, discrimination, and economic injustice. Ways that communities, governments, and businesses can address inequities in society are also examined.

The seminar emphasizes the development of students’ writing skills. Being able to write well is a valuable asset for success in college and later in most careers. Students write several reflective and analytical papers during the quarter. Each paper undergoes at least one revision after the student receives constructive feedback from the instructor. Thus, the instructors work closely with each student throughout the quarter.

Special Academic Programs

Optional programs are available to involve College Ten students in academic and cocurricular activities beyond the first-quarter core course. They are designed to promote students’ academic achievement and success by connecting them with faculty mentors and helping them pursue leadership experiences in particular contexts.

Social Justice Issues Workshop
College Ten students have the option of enrolling in the Social Justice Issues Workshop in winter quarter. This 2-credit course meets once per week and can be taken in addition to a regular 15-credit academic load. The workshop offers a small, dynamic learning community in which members explore important issues of personal and cultural identity; social, political, and environmental concerns; and community-mindedness. The class emphasizes small-group experiential learning through structured exercises and group activities, and also includes discussions, film presentations, and guest speakers. The course is offered to both first-year and upper-division students.

Service Learning
Students can extend their learning beyond the classroom by getting practical experience and course credit working as an intern for a community organization or a school. This type of practical experience is known as service learning or field study. Examples include assisting in a classroom or a homeless shelter. College Ten has its own service-learning program. In addition, there are a variety of service- learning programs in the academic Departments in the social sciences, including Community Studies, Economics, Environmental Studies, Latin American and Latino Studies, Psychology, and Sociology. Whether through College Ten or their major, students enrolled in one of these programs work with both a field supervisor and a faculty sponsor. The field supervisor guides the student at the practicum site, while the faculty sponsor helps the student develop a reading list and paper topic related to the placement. The College Ten advising staff will help students find possible practicum programs at the college or in academic departments.

Practical Activism: Lessons in Local and Global Change
This annual one-day conference focuses on international social justice concerns in the local context. Students gain valuable leadership skills in developing and implementing this exceptional program, which involves collaboration among faculty, staff, and the local community.

Students as Teachers and Mentors
College Ten students have special opportunities to become course assistants, tutors, and student mentors. By enrolling in Teaching Social Justice, students gain experience as teachers leading their own discussion sections of a College Ten course. They receive close supervision that emphasizes a collaborative approach to developing and enhancing teaching, communication, and leadership skills. The College Ten academic advisers can also direct students to other opportunities for student- teaching and peer-mentoring programs on campus. These are excellent opportunities to work closely with a faculty member and to develop one’s own skills as a teacher and a leader.

Research Opportunities
The UC Santa Cruz faculty are ranked high in their quality of research. College Ten students are encouraged to take advantage of the many excellent opportunities available to work closely with faculty as research apprentices. Students will find many internship, independent study, or senior thesis programs in the departments of most majors. The College Ten academic advisers will help link students with these programs. College Ten students will also have connections to faculty affiliated with various research institutes concerned with international and global issues. These institutes are affiliated with the Social Sciences Division and include the following:

  • The Center for Agroecology & Sustainable Food Systems (go here for more information)
  • The Center for Global, International and Regional Studies (go here for more information)
  • The Center for Justice, Tolerance, and Community (go here for more information)
  • The Chicano/Latino Research Center (go here for more information)
  • The Santa Cruz Center for International Economics (go here for more information)

College Ten Scholars Program
Eligible College Ten frosh may apply to the Scholars Program. This includes enrolling in an honors section of the frosh writing seminar in the fall, the 2-credit workshop in the winter, and a special seminar in the spring.

College Ten Pathways to Distinction
Another feature of College Ten is that qualified students may graduate with College Ten Distinction. This recognition is intended to serve as an incentive for students to pursue activities that are especially apt to help them succeed in college and beyond. Two pathways are possible:

Research and scholarship. In the first pathway, students are encouraged to pursue research opportunities with faculty by completing three quarters (15 credits) of work on a senior thesis or a research internship. Students may be recognized with College Ten Distinction if they do a thesis or a research internship in their major on a topic related to the theme of social justice and community.

Service and leadership. The second route to graduating with College Ten Distinction is through completing three quarters (15 credits) of service-learning internships, teaching, or other forms of community service.

College Community and Facilities

Founded in fall 2002, College Ten is the newest college at UCSC. Consistent with UCSC’s founding vision, College Ten creates an integrated living and learning environment through engaging academic and extracurricular programs focusing on the theme of Social Justice and Community.

Monthly Theme Programming
The College Ten theme of Social Justice and Community forms a central foundation of our programming. Each month, we focus on a different aspect of social justice, and students and staff work together to develop programs, providing opportunities to learn about and enjoy different aspects of the topic. Theme events may include faculty presentations, open microphones, field trips, film series, and hands-on arts programs.

College Nights
Every quarter, students and staff work together to plan College Nights, which are large-scale community celebrations, held in the dining commons and open to all College Ten students whether or not they live on campus. College Nights include food, entertainment, and educational materials related to a theme.

Multicultural Community Weekend
This two-day retreat provides students from diverse backgrounds the opportunity to explore various components of multicultural communication. Through a series of structured exercises and small-group discussions, students share perspectives on issues such as multiculturalism, values orientation, and diversity. The goal of the workshop is to build community and friendship among students as well as to increase students’ understanding of the complexity of communicating across diverse backgrounds. The Multicultural Community Weekend is optional; students apply for this opportunity in the fall.

CREATE
The purpose of CREATE (Cultural Resources to Educate and to Empower) is to facilitate the ongoing discussion of diversity issues at College Ten and in our living communities, learn about and promote multiculturalism, plan activities, and help students and staff have a resource for inclusiveness and training.

Rainbow Club
The Rainbow Club provides opportunities for gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, intersex, queer, and questioning students and their allies to join together for self-awareness and social activities in a fun, relaxed atmosphere.

ENGAGE
(Explore New Growth and Gain Experience) ENGAGE offers students the opportunity to explore and develop their own beliefs, values, and feelings about current issues and social concerns through a wide range of exercises, guest speakers, discussions, and debates. Participants develop leadership skills and increase their efficacy as world citizens and leaders at College Ten. ENGAGE meets weekly throughout fall quarter.

Other Cocurricular Opportunities
Getting involved in cocurricular activities is a predictor of college success. Not only do college activities help students make friends, they foster leadership and group cooperation skills. There are opportunities at College Ten for student involvement, including the College Ten Student Government Association. These organizations are responsible for many of the programs previously described. Additionally, there are social and recreational opportunities such as dances, ski trips, and intramural sports for College Ten students. There are more specialized groups, such as Cloud Nine (the a cappella singing group), the Praxis Student Volunteer Community, and the Book Club.

Physical Surroundings
College Ten is situated in a redwood grove next to the Social Sciences 1 and 2 Buildings near the heart of campus. Peabody’s Coffee Cart, located on the ground floor of Social Sciences 2, serves espresso drinks, pastries, and sandwiches. Also, one of the campus’s Instructional Computing Labs is conveniently located in Social Sciences 2.

A nature preserve serves as College Ten’s “backyard.” College Ten students have immediate access to hiking, running, and mountain bike trails in the adjacent forest.

Newly constructed residence halls with 400 single and double bedrooms opened in fall 2002. These fully furnished residence halls include student lounges, recreational spaces, and Internet connections. In addition, a state-of- the-art dining hall with an adjoining game room and student lounge for both Colleges Nine and Ten opened in fall 2002.

Colleges Ten and Nine also house approximately 300 upper-division students in newly constructed apartments, with 190 students in single bedrooms and the balance in double and triple rooms. All apartments have full kitchens, living rooms, bathrooms, and Internet connections. Ground-floor apartments have decks, and most upper apartments have private balconies.

For more information about academic or general college programs, call (831) 459-5034, e-mail dslater@cats.ucsc.edu, or visit the College Ten web site: collegeten.ucsc.edu

College 10 Faculty and Staff
Provost
CAMPBELL LEAPER*
Division of Social Sciences; Psychology
Fellows

Charter Fellows*

NAMEERA AKHTAR* Psychology
JENNIFER ANDERSON* Environmental Studies
BETTINA APTHEKER Women’s Studies and History
MARGARITA AZMITIA Psychology
HEATHER BULLOCK* Psychology
MAUREEN CALLANAN Psychology
MARTIN M. CHEMERS* Acting Chancellor; Psychology
JOHN BROWN CHILDS* Sociology
FAYE CROSBY* Psychology
ROBERT FAIRLIE* Economics
JOHN ISBISTER* Economics
LORI KLETZER* Economics
COLIN LEACH* Psychology
PAUL ORTIZ* Community Studies
MANUEL PASTOR JR.* Latin American and Latino Studies
PAMELA PERRY* Community Studies
DANIEL PRESS* Environmental Studies
RAVI RAJAN* Environmental Studies
CRAIG REINARMAN* Sociology
MICHAEL ROTKIN* Community Studies
NANCY STOLLER* Community Studies
DANA TAKAGI* Sociology
EILEEN ZURBRIGGEN*

Psychology
College Administrative Officer

DEANA SLATER

 
Senior Academic Preceptor

ROBERT TAYLOR

 
Staff

EEMAN AGRAMA Coordinator of Residential Education
LUPE ALLEN Academic Adviser
ABBEY ASHER Service-Learning Coordinator
RACHEL BAUMAN Associate College Administrative Officer
WENDY BAXTER Manager of Cocurricular Programs
NANCY CHA Coordinator of Residential Education
OLIVIA CHAN Assistant to the Provost
JANE HARTMAN Assistant to the Provost and the College Administrative Officer
AMY HYLER-ESSIG Housing Coordinator
JAY JOHNSON Proctor
AUDREY KIM Psychologist
VICTOR KIMURA Financial Analyst
MATT LOZANO Housing Assistant
ED MACHADO Proctor
SIMON O’SHEA Coordinator of Residential Education
JOSÉ REYES-OLIVAS Cocurricular Programs Coordinator
CYNTHIA WELLE Coordinator of Residential Education
SARAH WOODSIDE College Programs Coordinator College residents enjoying an outdoor study session

 

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Revised 10/22/04.