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War Crimes Research Office


International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia
Status Updates

Last updated 30 June 2006

Upcoming

- 10 July: In the Milutinovic et al. case, the trial is scheduled to begin.
- 11 July: In the Martic case, the defense is scheduled to begin its case.
- 11 July: In the Blaskic case, Josip Jovic's trial for contempt of court is scheduled to begin.
- 13 July: In the Popovic et al. case, the trial is scheduled to begin.
- 29 August: In the Galic case, an appeal hearing will be held.


Ongoing Trials

- Krajisnik
- Martic
- Mrksic et al.
-
Prlic et al.

Cases Awaiting Judgment or Sentencing

-

Cases on Appeal

- Bulatovic
- Galic
- Hadzihasanovic and Kubura
- Simic
- Brdanin
- Blagojevic and Jokic
- Strugar

30 June 2006: In the Oric case, Naser Oric, a former senior commander of Bosnian Muslim forces in and around Srebrenica, is convicted of failing to take steps to prevent the murder and cruel treatment of several Serb prisoners. Finding that his criminal responsibility is limited due to the abysmal personal and circumstantial conditions in the area at the time in question, the judges sentence him to two years imprisonment. Because Oric has already spent more than three years in detention, he will be immediately released.

27 June 2006: In the Krajisnik case, the Trial Chamber issues an arrest warrant against Branko Djeric, former Prime Minister of Republika Srpska, on charges of contempt of court due to his failure to appear as a witness in the trial or to show cause why he could not comply with the subpoena requiring his appearance.

27 June 2006: Judges Ali Nawaz Chowhan (Pakistan) and Tsvetana Kamenova (Bulgaria) are sworn in as ad litem judges to sit on the Milutinovic et al. trial.

23 June 2006: In the Vukovar Three case, the prosecution rests its case.

21 June 2006: Dragan Nikolic, sentenced to 20-years imprisonment for his participation in crimes against Bosnian Muslim and other non-Serb civilians in the Susica Detention Camp in eastern Bosnia and Herzegovina, is transferred to Italy to serve his sentence.

20 June 2006: In the Martic case, the Prosecution rests its case.

15 June 2006: In the Blaskic case, the Prosecutor files a motion to withdraw the indictments against Stjepan Seselj, Marijan Krizic and Domagoj Margetic, Croatian journalists accused of making public the testimony and identify of a protected witness. The motion says that this decision was made under pressure to limit the scope of prosecutions and in order to avoid duplication with the separate case against Josip Jovic, who is charged with the same offence. The Prosecutor’s motion to join the two cases was recently denied.

13 June 2006: In the Prlic et al. case, Valentin Coric is granted temporary provisional release from June 14 – 19, 2006 to attend his father’s funeral.

13 June 2006: In the Zelenovic case, Dragon Zelenovic makes his initial appearance before the Court and exercises his right to delay entering a plea for 30 days. Zelenovic tells the Trial Chamber that he does not fully understand the content of the indictment and is not ready to enter his plea because he does not have a lawyer. Zelenovic was originally indicted along with Gojko Jankovic, whose case was transferred pursuant to rule 11bis from the tribunal to the War Crimes Chamber of the Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

10 June 2006: Dragon Zelenovic, accused of raping and torturing girls and women in Bosnian town of Foca in 1992, is taken into the custody of the Tribunal.

9 June 2006: In the Martic case, the Trial Chamber denies a defense motion requesting exclusion of the testimony of Milan Babic, who committed suicide before his cross-examination was completed. Instead, the defense will be given the opportunity to challenge “the exact portions of the evidence-in-chief of Milan Babic, upon which it intended to cross-examine him, but was unable to, as a result of his death.”

9 June 2006: The ICTY releases its report into the death of Milan Babic, who was found dead in the UN Detention Unit on March 5, 2006, after apparently committing suicide. The inquiry, headed by ICTY Vice-President Judge Kevin Parker, found no criminal conduct in Babic's death. The full report is available at http://www.un.org/icty/pressreal/2006/p1087-babicreport.htm.

9 June 2006: Dragan Zelenovic, a former sub-commander in the Bosnian Serb military police and paramilitary leader, is extradited from Russia to Bosnia-Herzegovina. He is expected to be transferred to the ICTY shortly. Zelenovic was was indicted by the ICTY on June 26, 1996, for crimes committed in Foca in 1992.

8 June 2006: Dario Kordic and Zoran Zigic are transferred to Austria to serve their 25-year sentences.

15 May 2006: The team of Swedish experts conducting an independent audit of the ICTY's Detention Unit following death of Slobodan Milosevic issues its report, available at http://www.un.org/icty/pressreal/2006/DU-audit.htm.

9 May 2006: In the Martic case, the trial is adjourned until further notice because the accused, Milan Martic, is ill.

8 May 2006: In the Rajic case, the Trial Chamber sentences former Bosnian Croat Army commander Ivica Rajic to 12 years imprisonment. In October 2005, Rajic pled guilty to the war crimes of willful killing 31 Bosnian Muslim civilians, appropriation of property, and extensive destruction related to an October 1993 attack against the village of Stupni Do, as well as ill treatment of more than 250 Muslim men in the nearby town of Vares.

6 May 2006: According to the ITAR-TASS news agency, Dragan Zelenovic, indicted by the ICTY for the rape and torture of Muslim women in Foca, Bosnia and Herzegovina, is freed on conditional release by a Russian court. In August 2005, unconfirmed news reports indicated that Russian authorities had taken Zelenovic into custody.

5 May 2006: In the Popovic et al. case, the Prosecutor files a Rule 11 bis application to refer the case against Milorad Trbic to the Bosnia and Herzegovina War Crimes Chamber. Trbic, a former security officer in the VRS Zvornik Brigade, is charged with genocide and other crimes in Srebrenica.

5 May 2006: In the Simic case, the Appeals Chamber grants Blagoje Simic’s motion for temporary provisional release from May 10-25, 2006, to attend memorial services for his mother in Bosnia and Herzegovina. In October 2003, Simic was sentenced to 17 years imprisonment for crimes against Bosnian Muslim and Bosnian Croat civilians in the Bosanski Samac municipality, where Simic served as the highest ranking civilian official. Both the prosecution and defence have appealed the Trial Chamber judgment.

3 May 2006: In the Naletilic and Martinovic case, the Appeals Chamber confirms the conviction and sentences of Bosnian Croat commanders Mladen Naletilic and Vinko Martinovic. In March 2003, the Trial Chamber sentenced Naletilic to 20 years and Martinovic to 18 years imprisonment for their involvement in the ethnic cleansing of Bosnian Muslim civilians in the Mostar area of Bosnia and Herzegovina between April 1993 and January 1994.

26 April 2006: In the Prlic et al. case, the trial of Jadranko Prlic, Bruno Stojic, Slobodan Praljak, Milivoj Petkovic, Valentin Coric and Berislav Pusic begins. The defendants are accused of participating in a joint criminal enterprise to ethnically cleanse Bosnian Muslims and other non-Croats from areas in the territory of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina that were claimed as part of “Herceg-Bosna” in 1991.

25 April 2006: Judge Antoine Kesia-Mbe Mindua of the Democratic Republic of the Congo is sworn in as a reserve ad litem judge in the Prlic et al. case.

21 April 2006: In the Limaj et al. case, the Appeals Chamber grants Haradin Bala's motion for temporary provisional release from April 23-27 to attend his daughter’s memorial service in Kosovo. The Trial Chamber sentenced Bala to 13 years imprisonment in November 2005.

12 April 2006: In the Pavkovic et al. and Milutinovic et al. cases, in response to reports that Dragoljub Ojdanic, Nikola Sainovic and Nebojsa Pavkovic attended the March 18 funeral of Slobodan Milosevic in the town of Pozarevac while on provisional release, the Trial Chamber asks Serbian authorities to respond in writing within 14 days "whether it is their practice to exempt some of the accused from explicit provisions in the terms of their provisional release and to explain the basis for such a practice." In this case, the terms of release explicitly prohibit the three from leaving the Belgrade city limits. On March 20, the Serbian Justice Ministry issued a press release stating that "all provisionally released persons are allowed in certain circumstances to leave the Belgrade city limits for a few hours," but did not provide a legal basis for this practice.

12 April 2006: The Trial Chamber decides that Vladimir Kovacevic “does not have the capacity to enter a plea and stand trial, without prejudice to any future criminal proceedings against him should his mental health condition change.” Kovacevic, the former Commander of the JNA's Third Battalion, is charged in connection with the the attack on Dubrovnik, Croatia in 1991. He was arrested in Serbia in 2003, but was unable to enter a plea due to his medical condition. In 2004 he was provisionally released for medical treatment in Serbia and Montenegro.

12 April 2006: In the Ljubicic case, the Tribunal’s Referral Bench decides to refer the case of Pasko Ljubicic to Bosnia and Herzegovina in accordance with Rule 11bis of the ICTY Rules of Procedure and Evidence.

10 April 2006: In the Oric case, the trial ends. Naser Oric, the former commander of the Bosnian Muslim forces in Srebrenica has been on trial since October 2004 for crimes allegedly committed against Bosnian Serbs by troops under his command between 1992 and 1993.

7 April 2006: Judges Stefan Trechsel (Switzerland) and Arpad Prandler (Hungary) are sworn in as ad litem judges of the Tribunal, bringing the total of ad litem judges serving at the Tribunal to nine. Judges Trechsel and Prandler will serve on the Prlić et al. case.

7 April 2006: In the Mejakic et al. case, the Appeals Chamber upholds the decision to refer to Bosnia and Herzegovina for trial the case against Zeljko Mejakic, Momcilo Gruban, Dusan Fustar and Dusko Knezevic, involving crimes against non-Serbs in the Omarska and Keraterm camps in Preijedor between May and August 1992.

4 April 2006: Dutch authorities submit the results of their independent inquest into the death of Slobodan Milosevic to the Tribunal. The report confirms that Milosevic died of natural causes and rules out any suggestion of criminal conduct.

4 April 2006: Pavle Strugar, convicted by the Trial Chamber in January 2005 for crimes committed in Dubrovnik and sentenced to eight years imprisonment, returns to the UN Detention Unit after a four-month provisional release in the Republic of Montenegro for medical treatment. Both Strugar and the Prosecutor have appealed the Trial Chamber judgment to the Appeals Chamber.

30 March 2006: The Swedish Government accepts the Tribunal’s request to conduct an independent audit of the Detention Unit’s management and administration.

22 March 2006: In the Stakic case, the Appeals Chamber affirms the convictions against Milomir Stakic, the former President of the Prijedor Municipal Assembly, and resolves that the Trial Chamber incorrectly found him not guilty of the crime against humanity of other inhumane acts (forcible transfer). Moreover, the Appeals Chamber determines that Stakic is responsible for these acts as a participant in a joint criminal enterprise, and not as a co-perpetrator. Due to errors in the sentencing determination, the Appeals Chambers reduces his sentence from life in prison to forty years.

16 March 2006: Trial Chamber I orders that relevant confidential materials in the Milosevic case be released to Dutch authorities in order to assist them in their independent investigation into Milosevic’s death. The Trial Chamber notes that while the privacy of an accused is generally respected by the Tribunal, once an accused is deceased, the needs of the investigation outweigh any residual privacy interests.

15 March 2006: In the Hadzihasanovic and Kubura case, Enver Hadzihasanovic and Amir Kubura, formerly high level commanders in the Bosnian army, are acquitted on most charges, but are found to have superior responsibility for crimes committed by forces who acted under their effective control, including some foreign Mujahedin fighters. Hadzihasanovic is convicted of failing to take “necessary and reasonable measures” to prevent or punish two acts of murder and several acts of cruel treatment as violations of the laws and customs of war and is sentenced to five years imprisonment. Kubura is convicted of failing to prevent or punish the plunder of several villages and is sentenced to two and a half years imprisonment.

14 March 2006: In the Milosevic case, the Trial Chamber announces that the proceedings against Slobodan Milosevic are terminated.

11 March 2006: In the Milosevic case, Milosevic is found dead in his cell in the ICTY Detention Unit in Scheveningen. A full inquiry is ordered by the Tribunal President, Judge Fausto Pocar.

10 March 2006: In the Blaskic case, Ivica Marijacic, a journalist, and Markica Rebic, formerly head of the Security Information Service of the Republic of Croatia, are found guilty of contempt and sentenced to 15,000 Euros each for deliberately disclosing information about the testimony of Dutch Army officer Johannes van Kuijk, a protected witness in this case.

10 March 2006: In the Haradinaj et al. case, the Appeals Chamber upholds the Trial Chamber's October 2005 decision regarding the conditions of Ramush Haradinaj’s conditional release and further refines those conditions. Its decision provides that any request to UNMIK for permission to make a public appearance also be sent to the Prosecution, that the Prosecution must be provided at least forty-eight hours to respond to such a request, that UNMIK may not make a decision on a request before considering the views of the Prosecution, and that UNMIK must provided a reasoned explanation of its decision granting or denying a request.

8 March 2006: In the Momir Nikolic case, the Appeals Chamber reduces the defendant’s sentence to 20 years from 27 after finding that the Trial Chamber made mistakes in its sentencing determination. In 2003, Nikolic pled guilty to one count of persecution as a crime against humanity and was sentenced to 27 years imprisonment for his role in organizing the murder and deportation of thousands of Muslim residents of Srebrenica.

5 March 2006: Milan Babic is found dead in his cell at the United Nations Detention Unit in Scheveningen after apparently commiting suicide. Babic, the former president and prime minister of the Serb Republic of Krajina, pled guilty on 22 January 2004 to one count of persecution as a crime against humanity, expressed remorse for his actions, and was sentenced to 13 years imprisonment. He was in the process of testifying in the case against his successor as Krajina president, Milan Martic, and was going to be called as a prosecution witness in numerous other cases. He also testified against Slobodan Milosevic in 2002. ICTY Judge Kevin Parker is appointed to lead an inquiry into his death.

28 February 2006: The Security Council unanimously passes Resolution 1660 (2006), which amends the ICTY statute to permit the Secretary-General to appoint reserve judges from the Tribunal’s pool of ad litem judges to specific trials at the request of the Tribunal President. These reserve judges will be present at each stage of an ongoing trial and can replace a judge on a bench if he or she is unable to continue serving in that capacity. The resolution is intended to avoid situations where a trial must be restarted when a judge is unable to continue.

24 February 2006: In the Visegrad case, Milan Lukic makes his initial appearance before the Tribunal and pleads not guilty. Lukic is charged with 12 counts of crimes against humanity (persecution, murder [5 counts], inhumane acts [4 counts], extermination [2 counts]) and nine counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder [5 counts], cruel treatment [4 counts])

24 February 2006: In the Milosevic case, the Trial Chamber rejects the defendant’s request for provisional release to receive medical treatment in Russia.

21 February 2006: Milan Lukic, who was indicted by the Tribunal on 26 October 1998 for his involvement in the “White Eagles,” a Bosnian Serb paramilitary group, is transferred from Argentina to face charges at the ICTY. Lukic, who had been on the run for nearly five years, was arrested in Buenos Aires on 8 August.

1 February 2006: Belgrade admits that Serb officers helped indictee Ratko Mladic hide until mid-2002 and then let him escape.

24 January 2006: In the Blaskic case, the Appeals Chamber grants the Prosecution’s motion to lift all protective measures regarding Stjepan Mesic with regard to the contempt proceedings against journalists Stjepan Seselj and Domagoj Margetic. Mesic, who testified before the Tribunal in 1997 and 1998, is the president of Croatia.

19 January 2006: In the Blaskic case, the contempt trial of Ivica Marijacic and Markica Rebic ends.

17 January 2006: In the Blaskic case, the contempt trial of Markica Rebic, Croatia’s former intelligence chief, and Ivica Marijacic, former editor of Hrvatski List, begins. Rebic is accused of revealing the name and confidential 1997 testimony of a protected witness to Marijacic, who then published the information.

16 January 2006: In the Martic case, the Prosecution begins its case against Milan Martic, the former interior minister and president of the Republic of Serbian Krajina.

11 January 2006: An Argentine federal judge orders that ICTY indictee Milan Lukic be extradited to the ICTY, “with the prohibition to retransfer such person to another place that is not authorized in this ruling.” He also grants Lukic’s extradition to Serbia, where has been sentenced to twenty years imprisonment in absentia, “after his legal proceedings at the ICTY have ended.” The ICTY prosecutor has requested that Lukic be tried before Bosnia and Herzegovina’s War Crimes Chamber.

16 December 2005: In the Haradinaj et al. case, the Appeals Chamber stays the Trial Chamber's decision of 12 October 2005, which would have allowed Ramush Haradinaj “to appear in public and engage in public political activities.” The conditions laid out in the Decision for Provisional Release will apply until the Appeals Chamber renders its final decision.

16 December 2005: In the Strugar case, the Appeals Chamber orders the provisional release of Pavle Strugar for no longer than four months so that he can receive a total hip prosthesis at a rehabilitation center in Montenegro. On January 31, 2005, the Trial Chamber sentenced Strugar to eight years’ imprisonment for his involvement in the attack against the city of Dubrovnik in Croatia in 1991. Both Strugar and the prosecutor have appealed the judgment.

13 December 2005: In the Milosevic case, the Trial Chamber denies Milosevic’s request for an extension of time to conclude his defense, finding that he has “failed to take a reasonable approach to the presentation of his case.” Milosevic has used up more than 75% of his 360 total courtroom hours solely on his defense of the Kosovo indictment and, according to the Trial Chamber, “deliberately” left little of his allotted time to deal with Croatia and Bosnia so that the court would grant him an extension. Nevertheless, the judges determine that “[s]hould there be a clear indication in the future that [Milosevic] makes proper and efficient use of time, the chamber might reconsider the position.”  Second, the Trial Chamber decides, in agreement with the wishes of both the defense and the prosecution, not to split the Kosovo indictment from those addressing crimes in Bosnia and Croatia in an effort to speed up the process.  Third, the Trial Chamber rejects Milosevic’s application for a special six-week adjournment to rest, and instead extends the normal three-week winter recess to six.

13 December 2005: In the Martic case, the trial begins.

12 December 2005: At his initial appearance, Ante Gotovina pleads not guilty to four counts of crimes against humanity (persecution, deportation, and other inhumane acts [forced displacement; inhumane treatment, humiliation and degradation]) and three counts of  the violation of the laws or customs of war (murder; plunder; wanton destruction of cities, villages, or towns) stemming from his alleged participation in a "joint criminal enterprise" aimed at the "forcible and permanent" removal of the Serb population from the Krajina area of Croatia.

10 December 2005: Ante Gotovina is transferred to the Tribunal’s Detention Unit in The Hague. Gotovina, a former Croatian General, is charged with crimes that took place under his authority against the Serb population of Croatia during and in the aftermath of the August 1995 Croatian military offensive known as Operation Storm.

8 December 2005: Gojko Jankovic, indicted for crimes against humanity and war crimes in the area of the municipality of Foca, is transferred pursuant to rule 11bis from the tribunal to the War Crimes Chamber of the Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

7 December 2005: Croatian general Ante Gotovina is arrested in the Spanish Canary Islands. He is accused of masterminding the killing of at least 150 Serbs and the expulsion of some 150,000 others during Operation Storm, the August 1995 offensive against Serbs in Croatia’s Krajina region. He has been at-large since he was indicted by the tribunal in 2001.

7 December 2005: In the Bralo case, Miroslav Bralo, a former member of the Croatian Defense Council (HVO) unit known as the "Jokers," is sentenced to 20 years imprisonment. On 19 July 2005 he pled guilty to one count of crimes against humanity (persecution), three counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder, torture, outrages upon personal dignity including rape), and four counts of grave breaches of the Geneva Conventions (torture or inhuman treatment, unlawful confinement, unlawful confinement of civilians, inhuman treatment). The Trial Chamber said that without the guilty plea, Bralo’s sentence would have been considerably higher.

2 December 2005: Judges Frank Hoepfel (Austria) and Janet Nosworthy (Jamaica) are sworn in as ad litem judges for a four-year term. Currently, the tribunal has nine ad litem judges.

1 December 2005: In the Limaj et al. case, Fatmir Limaj and Isak Musliu are released from the ICTY Detention Unit.

30 November 2005: In the Limaj et al. case, Fatmir Limaj and Isak Musliu are found not guilty on all charges, and Haradin Bala is sentenced to 13 years for violations of the laws or customs of war (torture, cruel treatment and murder) in the KLA-run Llapushnik/Lapusnik prison camp in 1998.

25 November 2005: In the Deronjic case, the tribunal announces that Miroslav Deronjic will serve his ten-year sentence in Sweden. Deronjic pled guilty in 2003 to having ordered Serbian forces to attack the village of Glogova in 1993. During the attack, 64 Muslim civilians were killed and a substantial part of the village, including its mosque, was destroyed.

21 November 2005: Nebojsa Pavkovic is provisionally released. Pavkovic is indicted alongside Vladimir Lazarevic, Vlastimir Djordevic and Sreten Lukic for crimes against Kosovo Albanians.

17 November 2005: The permanent judges of the ICTY elect Judge Fausto Pocar (Italy) and Judge Kevin Parker (Australia) to two-year terms as President and Vice-President of the Tribunal, effective immediately.

17 November 2005: The fourth, and likely last, four-year term of office for ICTY permanent judges begins. The judges elected by the General Assembly include: Theodor Meron (USA), Fausto Pocar (Italy), Patrick Robinson (Jamaica), Carmel Agius (Malta), Liu Daqun (China), Mohamed Shahabuddeen (Guyana), Mehmet Guney (Turkey), Andresia Vaz (Senegal), Alphonsus Orie (Netherlands), Wolfgang Schomburg (Germany), O-gon Kwon (South Korea), Jean-Claude Antonetti (France), Kevin Parker (Australia), Iain Bonomy (UK), Bakone Moloto (South Africa) and Christine Van den Wyngaert (Belgium). Judge Moloto and former ad litem Judge Van den Wyngaert replace Judges Mumba (Zambia) and El Mahdi (Egypt).

16 November 2005: In the Jankovic case, the Appeals Chamber upholds the Trial Chamber decision to refer the case to Bosnia and Herzegovina.

16 November 2005: In the Halilovic case, the Trial Chamber acquits Sefer Halilovic, former chief of staff of the Muslim-dominated Bosnian army and the highest ranking Bosnian Muslim to have appeared before the ICTY, and orders his immediate release. Halilovic was charged with one count of violations of the laws and customs of war (murder) for his alleged superior responsibility for killings of Bosnian Croat civilians by Bosnian army units in the villages of Grabovica and Uzdol. The Trial Chamber rules that the prosecution failed to prove beyond reasonable doubt that Halilovic was was either the de jure or de facto commander of the troops who committed these crimes.

15 November 2005: In the Radic case, Mladjo Radic is transferred to France in order to serve his 20-year prison sentence.

11 November 2005: In the Milosevic case, the defendant is reported ill, forcing trial to be adjourned.

10 November 2005: Trial Chamber III denies the Prosecution’s motion to join three cases involving Milan Martic, Jovica Stanisic, Franko Simatovic and Vojislav Seselj.

3 November 2005: In the Seselj case, the Pre-Trial Chamber enters a plea of not guilty on behalf of the defendant, Vojislav Seselj. Seselj says he cannot enter a plea on 14 counts of crimes against humanity in Croatia, BiH and the Vojvodina region of Republika Srpska, because he has been unable to communicate with his legal counsel since receiving his amended indictment.

2 November 2005: In the Pavkovic et al. case, The Appeals Chamber rejects the provisional release of Nebojsa Pavkovic, former commander of the Serbian Third Army in Kosovo.

1 November 2005: In the Ademi and Norac case, the case is officially transferred to the Republic of Croatia. This is the first time that the ICTY has referred a case to Croatia. Rahim Ademi and Mirko Norac are charged with two counts of crimes against humanity (persecution, murder), and three counts of violations of the laws and customs of war (murder; plunder of public or private property; wanton destruction of cities, towns, or villages) for their alleged participation in crimes against the ethnic Serb population during the Croatian attack on the so-called Medak Pocket of the Krajina region in early September 1993.

26 October 2005: In the Rajic case, Ivica Rajic pleads guilty to four counts of grave breaches of the Geneva Conventions (willful killing, inhumane treatment [including sexual assault], appropriation of property, extensive destruction not justified by military necessity and carried out unlawfully and wantonly). In the plea agreement, Rajic and the Prosecution agreed to a recommended sentence of 12-15 years imprisonment.

25 October 2005: In the Vukovar Three case, the prosecution begins its case.

21 October 2005: In the Haradinaj et al. case, the Trial Chamber issues a stay of its October 12 decision to allow Ramush Haradinaj to resume limited political activities until November 21 or “until the date on which the Appeals Chamber renders its decision, whichever is earlier.”

14 October 2005: In the Haradinaj et al. case, following an appeal from the Prosecution, the Trial Chamber issues a stay of its decision on the conditions of Haradinaj’s provisional release.

14 October 2005: In the Blaskic case, Josip Jovic makes his initial appearance and pleads not guilty to one count of contempt. He is provisionally released to await trial.

12 October 2005: In the Milosevic case, the Trial Chamber orders Milosevic to produce a list of all witnesses he intends to call, and informs him that the time allotted for his defense runs out “sometime in March” next year.

12 October 2005: In the Haradinaj et al. case, the Trial Chamber grants Ramush Haradinaj’s motion for a re-assessment of the conditions of his provisional release and grants him the right to appear in public and engage in public political activities “to the extent which the UNMIK finds would be important for a positive development of the political and security situation in Kosovo,” subject to UNMIK’s prior approval. No prior accused awaiting trial at the ICTY has been allowed to take part in public political activities during provisional release.

11 October 2005: In the Vukovar Three case, the trial begins. Mile Mrksic, Miroslav Radic and Veselin Sljivancanin are charged with five counts of crimes against humanity (persecution, extermination, murder, torture, inhumane acts) and three counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder, torture, cruel treatment) in connection with the 1991 massacre, in which more than 200 people were removed from a hospital in Vukovar and taken to a nearby farm where they were shot and buried. All three have pleaded not guilty.

6 October 2005: In the Blaskic case, Croatian authorities arrest journalist Josip Jovic and he is jailed to await his extradition to the ICTY.

5 October 2005: In the Pavkovic et al. case, the Trial Chamber provisionally releases Sreten Lukic.

3 October 2005: Chief Prosecutor of the ICTY, Carla del Ponte, states that Croatia is complying in a satisfactory manner to all of the requests of the ICTY. In particular, del Ponte notes that actions taken by Croatia in the past few weeks illustrate its full cooperation in the ongoing operations to locate and arrest Ante Gotovina.

28 September 2005: In the Blaskic case, Trial Chamber I issues a warrant of arrest for Josip Jovic after he fails to appear to enter a plea of contempt before the Tribunal. Jovic is accused of “knowingly and wilfully publishing the name of a protected witness.”

21 September 2005: Trial Chamber III grants the prosecution’s motion to join into one indictment six cases involving nine accused charged with crimes relating to the Srebrenica massacre. The nine accused are Vujadin Popovic, Ljubisa Beara, Drago Nikolic, Ljubomir Borovcanin, Zdravko Tolimir, Radivoje Miletic, Milan Gvero, Vinko Pandurevic and Milorad Trbic.

20 September 2005: In the Visegrad case, Sredoje Lukic makes his initial appearance and pleads not guilty to all charges. The prosecution reports that it filed a motion to refer the case to Bosnia and Herzegovina. Lukic is charged with seven counts of crimes against humanity (extermination, persecution, murder [2 counts], inhumane acts [3 counts]) and five counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder [2 counts], violence to life and person [2 counts], cruel treatment).

16 September 2005: Sredoje Lukic is transferred to the ICTY Detention Unit from Republika Srpska. He was indicted in 1998 for crimes committed against the Muslim population in the Bosnian municipality of Visegrad.

14 September 2005: In the Ademi and Norac case, the case becomes the first to be transferred from the Tribunal to Croatia. The defendants are charged with two counts of crimes against humanity (persecution, murder) and three counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder; plunder of property; wanton destruction of cities, towns or villages).

13 September 2005: Sredoje Lukic, a Bosnian Serb policeman in Visegrad and former member of the White Eagles paramilitary group, surrenders to Serb authorities. Lukic is a cousin of Milan Lukic, the recently apprehended founder of the White Eagles.

9 September 2005: In the Blaskic case, indictments are unsealed against two Croatian journalists, Josip Jovic and Marijan Krizic. Both are charged with one count of contempt of the Tribunal for revealing the identity of protected witnesses in 2000 and 2004, respectively.

2 September 2005: In the Limaj et al. case, the trial ends.

1 September 2005: In the Jankovic et al. case, the Appeals Chamber rejects Radovan Stankovic’s appeal against the decision to transfer his case to Bosnia and Herzegovina.

30 August 2005: In the Miodrag Jokic case, the Appeals Chamber dismisses all of his grounds for appeal and affirms the sentence of seven years imprisonment related to aiding and abetting crimes committed during the shelling of the Croatian city of Dubrovnik in 1991. The Appeals Chamber nevertheless finds that the Trial Chamber erred in law by convicting Jokic on the basis of both individual and command responsibility, and vacates the conviction for command responsibility on all six counts.

25 August 2005: Dragan Zelenovic, a Bosnian Serb military police officer and paramilitary leader in the town of Foca, is reportedly arrested in Russia. He was indicted by the Tribunal in 1996.

8 August 2005: Milan Lukic, the former leader of a Bosnian Serb paramilitary group known as the “White Eagles” is arrested in Buenos Aires. He was indicted by the Tribunal in 1998 for attacks on Muslim civilians in and around the municipality of Visegrad from April 1992 to October 1994.

22 July 2005: In the Stanisic case, Mico Stanisic is provisionally released after the Appeals Chamber rejects the prosecution’s motion to stay his release. Stanisic was Interior Minister in Republika Srpska, and is charged with crimes against humanity (persecution, extermination, murder, torture, inhumane acts, deportation, other inhumane acts [forcible transfer]) and violations of the laws or customs of war (murder, torture, cruel treatment).

22 July 2005: In the Tolimir et al. case, Radivoje Miletic and Milan Gvero are provisionally released after the Appeals Chamber rejects the prosecution’s motions to stay their release. Miletic and Gvero were generals in the Republika Srpska army and close aids to Ratko Mladic. They are charged with crimes against humanity (murder, persecution, deportation, other inhumane acts [forcible transfer]) and violations of the laws or customs of war (murder).

22 July 2005: In the Jankovic et al. case, the case of Gojko Jankovic becomes the fourth to be referred from the ICTY to Bosnia and Herzegovina. Jankovic, who was originally indicted with Dragan Zelenovic and Radovan Stankovic for crimes in the town of Foca, is charged with seven counts of violations of the laws and customs of war (torture, rape) and seven counts of crimes against humanity (torture, rape).

21 July 2005: In the Oric case, the Appeals Chamber rules that the Trial Chamber must reconsider its decision to limit the defense to nine weeks and only 30 witnesses. The defense requested eight months and 72 witnesses.

20 July 2005: In the Mejakic et al. case, the case is referred to Bosnia and Herzegovina. Each of the accused—Zeljko Mejakic, Momcilo Gruban, Dusan Fustar and Dusko Knezevic—are charged with crimes against humanity (persecution, murder, other inhumane acts) and violations of the laws or customs of war (murder, cruel treatment), and all but Knezevic are charged with both individual and superior responsibility for these crimes.

20 July 2005: In the Deronjic case, the defendant’s appeal is rejected by the Appeals Chamber and his sentence of ten years imprisonment is affirmed.

19 July 2005: In the Bralo case, the defendant pleads guilty to one count of crimes against humanity (persecution), three counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder, torture, outrages upon personal dignity including rape), and four counts of grave breaches of the Geneva Conventions (torture or inhuman treatment, unlawful confinement [2 counts], inhuman treatment). The charges relate to crimes committed in Ahmici and other parts of the Lasva valley in Bosnia and Herzegovina in 1993.

18 July 2005: In the Boskoski and Tarculovski case, provisional release is rejected for the two defendants. They will remain in detention until their trial begins.

18 July 2005: In the Babic case, the Appeals Chamber finds that the Trial Chamber erred in law in categorically refusing to take the Appellant’s attempts to further peace into account as a mitigating factor on the basis that they did not directly alleviate the suffering of the victims. Nevertheless, it upholds his 13-year sentence after finding that this factor need not be given significant weight in light of the gravity of the crime of which he was convicted and the seriousness of the case. Babic was sentenced in 2004 after pleading guilty to one count of crimes against humanity (persecution).

14 July 2005: In the Seselj case, the defendant loses his outside communication privileges for two months except for legal counsel and diplomatic and consular staff. The accused revealed the identity of a protected witness in a telephone conversation on 18 June 2005.

14 July 2005: In the Halilovic case, the defense rests its case.

12 July 2005: The Trial Chamber approves the joinder of the Pavkovic et al. and the Milutinovic et al. cases. The seven accused—Milan Milutinovic, Nikola Sainovic, Dragoljub Ojdanic, Nebojsa Pavkovic, Vladimir Lazarevic, Sreten Lukic and Vlastimir Djordjevic—are or were Serbian politicians and police or military generals. They are charged with four counts of crimes against humanity (persecution, deportation, murder, other inhumane acts [forcible transfer]), and one count of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder) related to the deportation and forcible transfer of around 800,000 Kosovar Albanians in 1999.

8 July 2005: In the Todovic and Rasevic case, the case of Mitar Rasevic and Savo Todovic is transferred to Bosnia and Herzegovina. The trial of the third person on the indictment, Dragomir Milosevic, will be heard by the Tribunal due to the gravity of the crimes charged and his level of responsibility. Rasevic is charged with seven counts of crimes against humanity (persecution, torture, inhumane acts [2 counts], murder, imprisonment, enslavement) and five counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (torture, cruel treatment [2 counts], murder, slavery). Todovic is charged with seven counts of crimes against humanity (persecution, torture, inhumane treatment, murder, imprisonment, enslavement, other inhumane acts), five counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (torture, murder, inhumane treatment [two counts], slavery), and six counts of grave breaches of the Geneva Conventions (murder, torture, wilfully causing great suffering or serious injury to body or health, illegal detention of a civilian, inhuman treatment, wilfully causing great suffering).

30 June 2005: In the Mrksic et al. case, Trial Chamber II grants the prosecutor’s motion to withdraws a request under rule 11bis to refer the case to Croatia.

22 June 2005: In the Todorovic case, the defendant’s sentence is commuted after serving two-thirds of his sentence. Stevan Todorovic was sentenced to 10 years imprisonment in 2001 after pleading guilty to one count of crimes against humanity (persecution).

14 June 2005: In the Blaskic case, Croation journalist Ivica Marijacic and his source, former Croatian intelligence chief Marika Rebic, as well as Stjepan Seselj and Domagoj Margetic, the publisher and editor of Hrvatsko Slovo, plead not guilty to charges of contempt of court for allegedly publishing the identity and testimony of protected witnesses.

13 June 2005: In his bi-annual report to the Security Council, ICTY President Theodor Meron predicts that trials will not be completed by 2008 as ordered by the Council and will extend into the year 2009. Meron notes that Chief Prosecutor has issued seven new or amended indictments, sixty accused are yet to stand trial, ten indictees remain at large, and the Tribunal has only decided to refer one case to a national court thus far. The possibility of building a fourth courtroom is being considered.

9 June 2005: In the Vukovar Three case, the Office of the Prosecutor withdraws its application to refer the case against Mile Mrksic, Veselin Sljivancanin and Miroslav Radic to national courts in Croatia or Serbia and Montenegro. The three former JNA officers are charged with the massacre at Ovcara, near Vukovar, in November 1991. In withdrawing the application, the prosecution highlights unforeseen potential difficulties in trying them locally and the importance of the case to the UN Security Council, as demonstrated by a 1998 resolution demanding their immediate surrender to the ICTY.

9 June 2005: In the Perisic case, Trial Chamber III grants former Serb army general Momcilo Perisic's motion for provisional release subject to certain specific terms and conditions.

8 June 2005: In the Oric case, the Trial Chamber applies amended Rule 98bis for the first time. This time-saving measure authorizes the Chamber to enter a judgment of acquittal by oral decision on any count if there is no evidence capable of supporting a decision. The Trial Chamber upholds the charges of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder, cruel treatment, wanton destruction), and acquits the defendant of two counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (plunder).

6 June 2005: In the Haradinaj et al. case, Trial Chamber II grants provisional release to Ramush Haradinaj subject to certain restrictions.

31 May 2005: In the Oric case, the prosecution rests its case against Naser Oric, a former commander of the BiH Army forces in the Srebrenica region who is accused of the plunder and destruction of Serb villages and abuse and murder of detainees in 1992-1993.

30 May 2005: In the Halilovic case, Judge György Szénási of Hungary resigns for health reasons is replaced by Judge Florence Mumba of Zambia, who currently sits on the Appeals Chamber. A permanent judge at the Tribunal, Judge Mumba did not seek reappointment to an additional four-year term; her current term expires on 17 November 2005. The trial is to continue on June 2nd.

17 May 2005: The ICTY Referral Bench decides to refer the case against Radovan Stankovic to Bosnia and Herzegovina. This is the first time the Tribunal has referred one of its indictments to a national jurisdiction. The indictment alleges that in 1992 Stankovic, together with other Serb soldiers, was in charge of a house used to detain at least nine Muslim women and girls who were subjected to repeated rape and sexual assault, and that he personally raped at least two women-one of whom he claimed as his own in order to repeatedly rape her over a three-month period. He is charged with four counts of crimes against humanity (enslavement, rape), and four counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (rape, outrages upon personal dignity).

13 May 2005: In the Milosevic case, Kosta Bulatovic, a defence witness in the Slobodan Milosevic case, is found guilty of contempt of the tribunal for refusing the answer questions. He is given a sentence of four months, suspended for two years, conditional on his future cooperation with the Tribunal.

11 May 2005: In the Pandurevic and Trbic case, Milorad Trbic, a former officer in the Republika Srpska army, pleads not guilty to one count of crimes against humanity (murder) for his alleged role in the Srebrenica massacres.

6 May 2005: In the Rasim Delic case, the accused is granted provisional release until the start of his trial. Delic is charged with four counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder, rape, cruel treatment).

6 May 2005: In the Milosevic case, defense witness Kosta Bulatovic pleads not guilty and is tried for contempt of the Tribunal for refusing to answer questions from the prosecution.

5 May 2005: In the Borovcanin case, former deputy commander of the Special Police Brigade of the Republika Srpska Ministry of Interior Ljubomir Borovcanin pleads not guilty to complicity in genocide, crimes against humanity (extermination, murder, persecution, other inhumane acts [forcible transfer]) and violations of the laws or customs of war (murder) for his alleged role in the Srebrenica massacres.

5 May 2005: In the Limaj et al. case, Beqa Beqaj is sentenced to four months imprisonment for contempt of the Tribunal for attempting to influence a prosecution witness, and found not guilty of attempted contempt of the Tribunal and incitement to contempt of the Tribunal. He is released immediately because he has spent five months in prison since being arrested.

4 May 2005: In the Pavkovic et al. case, former Serbian general Sreten Lukic pleads not guilty to four counts of crimes against humanity (murder, persecution, deportation, other inhumane acts [forcible transfer]) and one count of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder) during the war in Kosovo.

3 May 2005: In the Pandurevic and Trbic case, former Bosnian Serb general Vinko Pandurevic pleads not guilty to genocide, conspiracy to commit genocide, crimes against humanity (murder, persecution, other inhumane acts [forcible transfer]) and violations of the laws or customs of war (murder), for his alleged role in the Srebrenica massacres.

27 April 2005: In the Blaskic case, two indictments for contempt of the Tribunal are released. One indictment charges Markica Rebic, former head of Croatia's Security Information Service, and Ivica Marijacic of the Zagreb weekly Hrvatski List with one count of contempt for disclosing the identity and statement of a protected witness. The second indictment charges Stjepan Seselj with one count of contempt, and Domagoj Margetic with two counts of contempt for disclosing the identity and testimony of a protected witness. Seselj was publisher of the Hrvatsko Slovo, and Margetic was editor of the Hrvatsko Slovo, then editor-in-chief of Novo Hrvatsko Slovo.

25 April 2005: In the Milosevic case, Milosevic returns to court after a week of absence due to "dangerously high blood pressure."

23 April 2005: Former Yugoslav army chief Nebojsa Pavkovic surrenders to the ICTY after a year and a half at large. Packovic is charged with both personal and superior responsibility for four counts of crimes against humanity (deportation, other inhumane acts [forcible transfer], murder, persecutions) and one count of the violations of the laws or customs of war (murder). The indictment stems from his alleged involvement in crimes committed during the 1998-99 conflict in Kosovo.

22 April 2005: The indictment against Goran Borovnica is withdrawn without prejudice. Boronvnica was indicted on 13 February 1995 for his involvement in the murder of Muslim prisoners during the 1992-95 Bosnian conflict in Prijedor. While Borovnica was declared dead in November 1996, some information suggests that he might still be alive. Should this be proved at a later date, the charges could be reinstated.

20 April 2005: In the Milosevic case, the proceedings are postponed until April 25 after doctors say that he cannot appear before the Tribunal because his high blood pressure places him at serious risk of a heart attack. This is the twentieth time in three years that the trial has been interrupted due to Milosevic's illness.

20 April 2005: In the Nikolic case, Drago Nikolic pleads not guilty to six counts of genocide, complicity in genocide and crimes against humanity (extermination, murder, persecution and other inhumane acts [forcible transfer]).

18 April 2005: In the Tarculovski case, former Macedonian police officer Johan Tarculovski pleads not guilty to three counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder; wanton destruction of cities, towns or villages; and cruel treatment) committed between 10 and 12 August 2001 in the village of Ljuboten.

18 April 2005: In the Popovic case, former Bosnian Serb officer Vujadin Popovic pleads not guilty to each of the six charges of his indictment. He is indicted with one count of genocide, four counts of crimes against humanity (extermination, murder, persecution and other inhumane acts [forcible transfer]) and one count of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder). According to the indictment, Popovic was the assistant commander of security of the Drina Corps, which was on duty at Srebrenica between July and August of 1995.

16 April 2005: In the Haradinaj case, former Kosovo Prime Minister Ramush Haradinaj is granted provisional release to attend the funeral of his brother who was assassinated on 15 April 2005.

15 April 2005: In the Jankovic case, former Bosnian Serb military leader Gojko Jankovic pleads not guilty to all 14 charges in his indictment. Jankovic is indicted on seven counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (torture, rape) and seven counts of crimes against humanity (torture, rape). The charges stem from his alleged involvement in the rape and torture of Muslim women during the 1992-95 war in Bosnia in the southeastern town of Foca.

15 April 2005: In the Tolimir et al. case, Bosnian Serb Army General Radivoje Miletic pleads not guilty to crimes against humanity (murder, persecution, deportation and other inhumane acts [forcible transfer]) and violations of the laws or customs of war (murder). Miletic served as deputy to Ratko Mladic from March to August 1995.

14 April 2005: Vujadin Popovic, a former Bosnian Serb army commander, is transferred to the Detention Unit of the ICTY after being at large for three years. His indictment, originally confirmed on 26 March 2002 but subject to a non-disclosure order, charges him with one count of genocide or complicity to commit genocide, four counts of crimes against humanity (extermination, murder, persecution and other inhumane acts [forcible transfer]), and one count of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder) related to the attack on the Srebrenica enclave by Bosnian Serv forces in July 1995.

14 April 2005: In the Milutinovic et al. case, the Trial Chamber decides to provisionally release the four accused.

13 April 2005: In the Trbic case, the Milorad Trbic makes an initial appearance at the ICTY and exercises his right to wait thirty days to enter his plea.

13 April 2005: In the Beara case, Ljubisa Beara enters a plea of not guilty to all seven counts of his indictment. Beara is charged with genocide, conspiracy to commit genocide, and four counts of crimes against humanity (extermination, murder, persecution and other inhumane acts [forcible transfer]) for his alleged involvement in the massacre in Srebrenica.

11 April 2005: In the Cesic case, Rank Cesic is transferred to Denmark to serve his 18-year sentence. Cesic pled guilty to six counts of crimes against humanity (murder, rape) and six violations of the laws or customs of war (murder). A former member of the Bosnian Serb Territorial Defense, he was convicted of crimes that took place in April 1992 while Serb forces were engaged in the take-over of the municipality of Brcko. Cesic is the first defendant to serve his sentence in Denmark.

8 April 2005: In the Trbic case, the Tribunal discloses the indictment, charging Milorad Trbic with one count of crimes against humanity (murder) related to the execution of thousands of captured Bosnian Muslim men from Srebrenica.

7 April 2005: In the Borovcanin case, Ljubomir Borovcanin does not enter a plea because the status of his defense counsel has not yet been resolved. The Tribunal orders that he appear again in thirty days. Borovcanin is charged with one count of complicity in genocide, four counts of crimes against humanity (extermination, murder, persecution, and other inhumane acts [forcible transfer]), and one count of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder) linked to his involvement in the attack on Srebrenica in July 1995.

7 April 2005: In the Beqaj case, the Tribunal orders the suspension of the provisional release of Beqa Beqaj, effective 21 April 2005. His trial is scheduled to begin on 25 April 2005. Beqaj is charged with contempt, attempted contempt and incitement to contempt for his alleged interference with and intimidation of witnesses in the Limaj case.

4 April 2005: Serbian police general Sreten Lukic surrenders to the court. Lukic is the second of four Serbian generals indicted for crimes in Kosovo to be transferred to the Tribunal. He is charged with four counts of crimes against humanity (deportation, murder, persecution and other inhumane acts [forcible transfer]), and one count of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder).

1 April 2005: Former Bosnian Serb Ministry of the Interior (MUP) forces commander Ljubomir Borovcanin is transferred to the ICTY. Borovcanin has been at large for approximately two and a half years. The indictment charges Borovcanin with one count of complicity in genocide, four counts of crimes against humanity (extermination, murder, persecution, other inhumane acts [forcible transfer]), and one count of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder).

31 March 2005: In the Pandurevic case, former Bosnian Serb General Vinko Pandurevic asks to postpone entering a plea for thirty days until he has time to study the indictment and consult with his defense counsel. Pandurevic is charged with genocide, crimes against humanity (extermination, murder, persecution and deportation) and violations of the laws or customs of war (murder).

31 March 2005: In the Miletic case, General Radivoje Miletic declines to offer a plea during his initial appearance and requests more time to study the indictment.

31 March 2005: In the Galic case, Stanislav Galic is released for four days to attend the memorial service of his late sister. Galic began serving a 20-year sentence on 5 December 2003.

30 March 2005: In the Beara case, the Trial Chamber allows the Prosecution to amend the indictment against Ljubisa Beara, the former Bosnian Serb Chief of Security Services of the VRS, to replace the charge of complicity in genocide with the charge of conspiracy to commit genocide. Beara is also charged with one count of genocide and four counts of crimes against humanity (extermination, murder, persecution and other inhumane acts [forcible transfer]) related to his involvement in the attack on Srebrenica.

30 March 2005: In the Kvocka case, Miroslav Kvocka is granted early release after serving two-thirds of his seven-year sentence. Kvocka was found guilty on one count of crimes against humanity (persecution) and two counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder, torture).

24 March 2005: Former Macedonian Interior Minister Ljube Boskoski is taken into custody by the ICTY. Boskoski is charged with three counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder; wanton destruction of cities, towns or villages; and cruel treatment). The charges stem from his alleged involvement in the murder of seven ethnic Albanian civilians during the seven-month conflict in Macedonia between ethnic Albanian guerillas and Macedonian government security forces in 2001.

23 March 2005: Former Bosnian Serb general Vinko Pandurevic surrenders to the Tribunal. Pandurevic is charged with genocide, crimes against humanity (extermination, murder, persecution, deportation, other inhumane acts), and violations of the laws or customs of war (murder). The charges stem from allegations that Pandurevic, along with Ratko Mladic and Radislav Krstic, commanded and controlled Army of Republika Srpska forces that either killed or expelled most of the members of the Bosnian Muslim population of Srebrenica in July 1995.

18 March 2005: Former Bosnian Serb army officer Drago Nikolic surrenders to the Tribunal. Nikolic is charged with one count of genocide, three counts of crimes against humanity (extermination, murder, and persecution) and one count of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder). The charges stem from his alleged involvement in the Srebrenica massacre in July 1995.

18 March 2005: In the Jankovic case, former Bosnian Serb paramilitary leader Gojko Jankovic makes his initial appearance before the Tribunal. The hearing is adjourned after Jankovic states he did not have enough time to study the indictment against him or the opportunity to discuss the indictment with his lawyer.

17 March 2005: In the Stanisic case, Mico Stanisic pleads not guilty at his initial appearance before the ICTY. Stanisic is charged with seven counts of crimes against humanity (persecution, extermination, murder, torture, other inhumane acts [forcible transfer], and deportation) and three counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder, torture, and cruel treatment). The charges stem from crimes committed in 1992 when Stanisic was the interior minister of Republika Srpska.

17 March 2005: ICTY President Theodor Meron says that the tribunal will cease to operate only when the trials of Ratko Mladic, Radovan Karadzic and Ante Gotovina (the three highest-ranking officials that have not yet surrendered to the Tribuna) are concluded.

17 March 2005: Drago Nikolic, former chief of security of the Zvornik Brigade in the Republika Srpska army, surrenders to the ICTY. Nikolic is charged with genocide, crimes against humanity (extermination, murder, persecution) and violation of the laws or customs of war (murder) in Srebrenica in July 1995.

16 March 2005: Johan Tarculovski arrives at the ICTY Detention Unit. Macedonia extradited the former police officer to the ICTY to face charges relating to war crimes committed against ethnic Albanians in 2001.

15 March 2005: The ICTY releases its final indictment, charging Ljube Boskoski, former Minister of Interior of Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (FRYOM), and Johan Tarculovski, head of a police unit in the security forces, with war crimes for their activities in Ljuboten from May 2001 until November 2002. Each accused is charged with three counts of violations of laws and customs of war (murder, wanton destruction and cruel treatment). They are the only Macedonians indicted by the ICTY.

15 March 2005: In the Haradinaj et al. case, Haradinaj, Balaj, and Brahimaj plead not guilty.

14 March 2005: Gojko Jankovic is transferred to the ICTY Detention Unit. Jankovic was was indicted in June 1996 for his alleged involvement in the military attack on the town of Foca (BiH) and various surrounding villages, and in the subsequent arrests, beatings, sexual assaults and murders of civilians. He is charged with seven counts of crimes against humanity (torture and rape) and seven counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (torture and rape). Jankovic was sub-commander of the military police and paramilitary leaders in Foca at the time relevant to the indictment.

10 March 2005: The Tribunal releases the indictment against Mico Stanisic, charging him with seven counts of crimes against humanity (persecution, extermination, murder, torture, other inhumane acts [forcible transfer] and deportation), and three counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder, torture, and cruel treatment) occuring in the territories of Croatia and BiH from April 1, 1992 until December 31, 1995. By virtue of his role as the the Minister of Internal Affairs in Republika Srpska, he had authority over the functioning of the police forces within Republika Srpska during this time.

10 March 2005: The ICTY releases the indictment against Ramush Haradinaj, Idriz Balaj, and Lahi Brahimaj. Haradinaj is charged with 17 counts of crimes against humanity, including persecution (harassment, inhumane acts, destruction of property, unlawful detention, deportation or forcible transfer of civilians, murder, rape), inhumane acts, deportation and other inhumane acts, imprisonment and other inhumane acts, murders and other inhumane acts, rape and other inhumane acts; and 20 counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (cruel treatment, murders, rape). Balaj and Brahimaj, both subordinanates of Haradinaj at the time of the alleged crimes, are charged with 16 counts of crimes against humanity (persecution [harassment, inhumane acts, unlawful detention, deportation or forcible transfer of civilians, murder, rape], deportation and other inhumane acts, imprisonment and other inhumane acts, murders and other inhumane acts, rape and other inhumane acts; and 19 counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (cruel treatment, murders, rape).

8 March 2005: In the Limaj et al. case, Beqa Beqaj is provisionally released, subject to specific terms and conditions set out by the Tribunal in an order issued on March 4, 2005. Beqaj plead not guilty in November 2004 to charges of "knowingly and willfully interfering with the administration of justice by threatening, intimidating, offering a bribe to or otherwise interfering with witnesses or potential witnesses."

8 March 2005: After learning that he has been indicted by the ICTY, Ramush Haradinaj resigns as Prime Minister of Kosovo to face charges related to his role as a commander in the Kosovo Liberation Army (KLA) during the period from March 1-September 30, 2005. He is the first sitting politician to be indicted by the ICTY since President Milosevic.

7 March 2005: In the Perisic case, the ICTY releases the indictment against Momcilo Perisic. The indictment charges Perisic with eight counts of crimes against humanity (murder, inhumane acts, persecution and extermination) and five counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder, attacks on civilians) committed in Croatia and Bosnia. From around August 26, 1993 until November 24, 1998 the accused was the Yugoslav army's most senior official and had authority over all its military forces.

4 March 2005: In the Prcac case, Dragoljub Prcac is released from custody in the Detention Unit after serving his full five-year sentence. He was convicted of one count of crimes against humanity (persecution) and two counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder, torture).

28 February 2005: In the Kvocka et al. case, the Appeals Chamber issues its judgment. The Chamber allows some of Miroslav Kvocka's appeals, but affirms his sentence of seven years. It dismisses all of Dragoljub Prcac's and Mladjo Radic's appeals and affirms their sentences of five years and twenty years, respectively. The Chamber allows some of Zoran Zigic's appeals, but affirms his sentence of 25 years.

28 February 2005: Rasim Delic is transferred to the ICTY Detention Unit in the Hague.

25 February 2005: In the Tolimir case, the ICTY releases the indictment against Zdravko Tolimir. Tolimir was the assistant commander for intelligence and security of the main staff of the Bosnian Serb Army, reporting directly to General Ratko Mladic. The indictment alleges that, by virtue of his position, Tolimir had knowledge of the plan to force the Muslim population from the Srebrenica and Zepa enclaves and was involved in the plan's execution. He is charged with four counts of crimes against humanity (murder, persecution, other inhumane acts [forcible transfer] and deportation) and one count of violation of the laws and customs of war (murder).

24 February 2005: In the Gvero and Miletic case, the ICTY releases the indictments against the accused. Milan Gvero was assistant commander for morale, legal, and religious affairs of the main staff of the Bosnian Serb Army, and Radivoje Miletic was chief of operations and training and deputy chief of staff. Both are charged with crimes against humanity (murder, persecution, other inhumane acts [forcible transfer] and deportation) and violation of the laws or customs of war (murder) committed against the Muslim population in the Srebrenica and Zepa enclaves (East Bosnia) from 1992 until 1995.

24 February 2005: The ICTY releases the indictment against Rasim Delic. Delic was the commander of the main staff of the Army of Bosnia and Herzegovina (ABiH) between June 1993 and December 1995. The indictment charges Delic with four counts of violations of the laws and customs of war (murder, rape and cruel treatment) for the crimes committed by the ABiH soldiers in the Travnik and Zavidovici municipalities. Delic is the highest-ranking military officer from the ABiH to be indicted for war crimes.

22 February 2005: Rasim Delic, retired general and wartime commander of the Bosnia-Hercegovina Army between 1993 and 1995, announces that he will surrender to the ICTY. Delic is indicted for failure to prevent or punish war crimes committed against ethnic Serbs by a unit of mujahidin fighters from Muslim countries.

21 February 2005: Former Bosnian Serb general Milan Gvero surrenders to the ICTY after a meeting with Serbian Justice Minister Zoran Stojkovic. Gvero was a deputy to former general Ratko Mladic. The indictment against Gvero was issued in December by Chief Prosecutor Carla Del Ponte, and has not yet been made public.

17 February 2005: In the Todovic case, Todovic declines to enter a plea at his second appearance at the Tribunal. A not guilty plea is entered on his behalf. According to the indictment, Todovic is charged with crimes against humanity (persecutions, unlawful detention of civilians, murder, torture, cruel treatment, inhumane acts, causing grievous bodily and mental harm, enslavement) and other crimes committed in the Foca detention facility between 1992 and 1993. Todovic will be tried with Mitar Rasevic, former guard commander in Foca, who has been charged with the same crimes.

14 February 2005: In the Brdjanin and Zupljanin case, a warrant of arrest and order for surrender is issued for Stojan Zupljanin.

14 February 2005: In the Slobodan Milosevic case, the judges suggest that Milosevic stop wasting time and ask witnesses more focused questions so that he will have enough time to present an adequate defense.

10 February 2005: In the Slobodan Milosevic case, the trial chamber issues an order setting out in detail the time both the Prosecution and Milosevic have been allocated to present their cases, and how much time has been used to date. The Chamber notes its order of 25 February 2004 providing that Milosevic would have the same amount of time as the Prosecution to present his case. Milosevic is allotted 90 sitting days to present his case in chief.

9 February 2005: In the Vukovar Three case, ICTY Chief Prosecutor Carla Del Ponte requests that the trial be referred to courts in either Croatia or Serbia-Montenegro. The former Yugoslav People's Army (JNA) officers are charged with killing at least 264 Croatian prisoners of war after they were taken from the Vukovar hospital in November 1991. The Prosecution recommends the case be transferred either to Croatia where the crimes were committed, or to Serbia where the accused were arrested and there is an ongoing related trial. The Tribunal will decide if and where the case will be transferred.

9 February 2005: In the Kvocka case, the Appeals Chamber terminates the provisional release of Miroslav Kvocka to take effect on 25 February 2005.

7 February 2005: In the Slobodan Milosevic case, ICTY President Theodor Meron affirms the denial by the ICTY Registrar of the application by Milosevic's counsel to withdraw from the case. The Registrar's decision implemented the December 7 decision of the Trial Chamber finding no good cause for withdrawal.

7 February 2005: In the Lazarevic case, Vladimir Lazarevic pleads not guilty to charges of violations of the laws and customs of war (murder) and crimes against humanity (deportation, persecution, murder, other inhumane acts [forcible transfer]) stemming from his alleged role in the Racak massacre of 45 ethnic Albanian civilians in Kosovo in January 1999. The prosecution asks that the Lazarevic case be joined with the pending trial of former Serbian President Milan Milutinivic, former Yugoslav Vice President Nikola Sainovic and Yugoslav army chief Dragoljub Ojdanic.

4 February 2005: In the Dragan Nikolic case, the Appeals Chamber reduces his sentence to 20 years. Nikolic, the former Bosnian Serb commander of the Susica detention camp was convicted of crimes against humanity (persecution [encompassing murder, rape and torture]). He was originally sentenced to 23 years imprisonment in December 2003.

3 February 2005: In the Lazarevic case, Vladimir Lazarevic, commander of the Pristina Corps of the Yugoslav Army, is transferred from Serbia to the Detention Unit of the ICTY in the Hague. He was indicted by the Tribunal on October 2, 2003, alongside three other Serbian generals. He is charged with responsibility as a superior for violations of the laws and customs of war (murder) and crimes against humanity (deportation, persecution, murder, other inhumane acts [forcible transfer]). The indictment alleges that Lazarevic directed, supported or encouraged the activities of the Yugoslav army in Kosovo, where it murdered hundreds of Kosovo Albanian civilians and cause the forced deportation of approximately 800,000 Kosovo Albanian civilians.

1 February 2005: In the Slobodan Milosevic case, Milosevic is absent from the courtroom for health reasons. The Chamber will decide when to continue with the trial after it receives a report from Milosevic's doctor.

31 January 2005: In the Strugar case, the Trial Chamber sentences former lieutenant-general of the Yugoslav People's Army, Pavle Strugar, to eight years imprisonment for failing to prevent the siege and bombing of the Croatian city of Dubrovnik, specifically the historic Old Town, in December 1991. The Chamber holds that Strugar is guilty of superior responsibility on two counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (attacks on civilians, destruction or wilful damage done to institutions dedicated to religion, charity and education, the arts and sciences, historic monuments and works or art and science). He is acquitted of four counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder, cruel treatment, devastation not justified by military necessity, unlawful attacks on civilian objects).

31 January 2005: In the Halilovic case, the trial begins before Trial Chamber I. Halilovic is the highest ranking Bosnian-Muslim yet to stand trial at the Tribunal. He is charged with responsibility as a superior for violations of the laws and customs of war (murder) while Deputy Commander of the Supreme Command Staff of the Army of BiH during the military operations conducted in 1993 against Croat civilians in the Herzegovina villages of Grabovica and Uzdol in southern area of the country.

28 January 2005: Serbian general Vladimir Lazarevic surrenders to the Tribunal after meeting with Serbia and Montenegro Prime Minister Vojislav Kostunica. He is indicted for violations of the laws and customs of war (murder) and crimes against humanity (deportation, persecution, murder, other inhumane acts [forcible transfer]) committed during the Kosovo conflict in 1999.

25 January 2005: Judges Claude Hanoteau from France and Gyorgy Szenasi from Hungary are sworn in as additional ad litem judges.

21 Jaunary 2005: The General Assembly extends the mandates of seven short-term judges whose tenures were set to expire before the end of the trials over which they were presiding.

19 January 2005: In the Todovic and Rasevic case, Savo Todovic makes his initial appearance and is granted one month to enter a plea.

17 January 2005: In the Blagojevic and Jokic case, Vidoje Blagojevic is sentenced to 18 years in prison and Dragan Jokic is sentenced to nine years. Both men were tried for crimes committed against Bosnian Muslims following the fall of the Srebrenica enclave in July 1995. Blagojevic is found guilty of aiding and abetting the crimes complicity to commit genocide, crimes against humanity (murder, persecution, other inhumane acts), and violations of the laws or customs of war (murder). Jokic is found guilty of aiding and abetting crimes against humanity (extermination, persecution) and violations of the laws or customs of war (murder).

15 January 2005: Savo Todovic surrenders to the Bosnian Serb authorities and is immediately transferred to the Hague. The ICTY has indicted Todovic, a Bosnian Serb, with crimes against humanity (torture, persecution, murder, other inhumane acts, imprisonment, enslavement), violations of the laws and customs of war (torture, inhuman acts, murder, enslavement), and grave breaches of the Geneva Convention (torture, wilfully causing great suffering or serious injury to body or health, murder, unlawful confinement of a civilian, wilfully causing great suffering or serious injury to body or health, other inhumane acts) for the treatment of mainly Muslim prisoners at the Foca concentration camp, where he was deputy commander in 1992 and 1993. According to the indictment, Todovic was in charge of selecting detainees for killings, beatings, interrogations, forced labor and solitary confinement.

11 January 2005: In the Slobodan Milosevic case, the trial resumes.

10 January 2005: In the Slobodan Milosevic case, the court-appointed attorneys, Steven Kay and Gillian Higgins, file a request with the President of the ICTY challenging the Registrar's decision that they remain on the case.

17 December 2004: In the Kordic and Cerkez case, the Appeals Chamber affirms a sentence of 25 years imprisonment on Dario Kordic, and reduces Mario Cerkez' sentence trom 15 to six years after allowing most of his grounds of appeal.

7 December 2004: In the Dragomir Milosevic case, the accused makes his first appearance before before the Tribunal and pleads not guilty to all charges.

7 December 2004: In the Slobodan Milosevic case, Trial Chamber III denies the application by the defendant's court-assigned counsel and co-counsel to withdraw from the case, and instructs the Registrar to deny the application.

3 December 2004: Dragomir Milosevic surrenders to Serbian authorities and is transferred to the ICTY. The indictment charges him with four counts of crimes against humanity (murder, other inhumane acts) and three counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (unlawfully inflicting terror upon civilians, attacks on civilians) for attacks committed while he was commander of Bosnian Serb forces comprising or attached to the Sarajevo Romanija Corps deployed around the Bosnian capital of Sarajevo.

3 December 2004: In the Kordic and Cerkez case, Mario Cerkez is released from the Detention Unit after the Appeals Chamber concludes that his revised sentence will be lower than the time he has served.

3 December 2004: In the Stanisic and Simatovic case, the Appeals Chamber grants the defendants provisional release.

2 December 2004: In the Cermak and Markac case, the Appeals Chamber grants the defendants provisional release.

23 November 2004: ICTY President Theodor Meron, addressing the U.N. Security Council, affirms that the Tribunal is still on track for completing its work. He recommends extending the mandates of individual ad litem judges hearing cases that will not be completed by the end of their terms in June 2005, and asks the Council to consider amending the ICTY Statue to allow their re-election.

19 November 2004: The UN General Assembly elects 14 judges to the ICTY. The elected judges are: Carmel A. Agius (Malta), Jean-Claude Antonetti (France), Iain Bonomy (United Kingdom), O-gon Kwon (Republic of Korea), Liu Dagun (China), Theodor Meron (United States), Bakone Melema Moloto (South Africa), Alphonsus Martinus Maria Orie (Netherlands), Kevin Horace Parker (Australia), Fausto Pocar (Italy), Patrick Lipton Robinson (Jamaica), Wolfgang Schomburg (Germany), Mohamed Shahabuddeen (Guyana), and Christine Van den Wyngaert (Belgium). They will serve for four years beginning on 17 November 2005.

15 November 2004: In the Bralo case, Miroslav Bralo, a former member of the Croatian Defense Council (HVO) special forces, makes his initial appearance before the Tribunal. He is charged with nine counts of grave breaches of the Geneva Conventions and twelve counts of violations of the laws or customs of war for acts that took place during the armed conflict between the HVO and the Government of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina armed forces from January through mid-July 1993.

15 November 2004: Serbia's Prime Minister Vojislav Kostunica says his government will not risk outraging powerful nationalist groups by arresting and handing over war criminals to the Tribunal.

15 November 2004: In the Limaj et al. case, the trial of Fatmir Limaj, Haradin Bala and Isak Musliu begins in Trial Chamber II. The accused are charged with crimes against humanity and violations of the laws or customs of war. According to the indictment they commanded the Kosovo Liberation Army (KLA) forces in the Lapusnik/Llapushnik Prison Camp during the 1998-99 conflict in Kosovo where they participated in maintaining and enforcing inhumane conditions and in aiding and abetting the torture, beatings and murders of detainees.

15 November 2004: In connection with the Limaj et al. case, Beqe Beqaj's contempt trial begins.

12 November 2004: In the Beara case, former Bosnian Serb army officer Ljubisa Beara makes his first appearance in front of the Tribunal and pleads innocent to genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes in connection with the 1995 Srebrenica massacre. Beara is one of the highest-ranking Bosnian Serb officials to stand trial for this crime.

8 November 2004: Beqe Beqaj, a relative of Isak Musli (who will soon be tried by the Tribunal in the Limaj et al. case) makes his first appearance at the Tribunal. He pleads not guilty to knowingly and willingly threatening, intimidating and offering bribes to or otherwise interfering with witnesses or potential witnesses in the Limaj et al. case. Beqaj is the first person charged with contempt of court by the Tribunal.

3 November 2004: In the Ademi and Norac case, a special panel of judges assigned to rule on whether generals Rahim Ademi and Mirko Norac should be transferred to Croatian courts requests the parties provide additional information about the gravity of the crimes and the level of responsibility of the accused. This is the first of five cases that is under consideration for transfer to national courts in the region.

3 November 2004: In the Miroslav Tadic case, Judge Theodor Meron, the President of the Tribunal, grants Tadic early release. Tadic was found guilty on one count of crimes against humanity (persecution), and was sentenced to eight years imprisonment on 17 October 2003. Judge Meron based his decision on the facts that Tadic served two thirds of his sentence, the genuine remorse Tadic expressed during his trial, his cooperation with the Tribunal, his "exemplary" behavior in the detention center, and the likelihood that he will be welcomed back into the community.

1 November 2004: In the Milosevic case, the Appeals Chamber rules that Slobodan Milosevic will be allowed to preside over his own defense so long as his physical health allows. The Chamber affirms the imposition of defense counsel and rules that the agreement disproportionately restricted the Milosevic's participation in his own defense. Milosevic will now have the lead in presenting his case while the assigned counsel will have a standby role of defending Milosevic if he cannot proceed due to ill health.

30 October 2004: A four-hour operation by Bosnian Serb police to apprehend and detain Gojka Jankovic, a former Bosnian Serb sub-commander of the military police in Foca, ends in failure. Jankovic has been indicted for rape and torture of Muslim women.

27 October 2004: In the Milosevic case, Steven Kay and Gillian Higgins request withdrawal from their role as assigned counsel for the defense, citing their inability to defend Milosevic since he is unwilling to participate in his defense.

22 October 2004: Former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic's trial is adjourned until 9 November because no witnesses are available to appear next week and a break is scheduled for the following week.

21 October 2004: The ICTY Appeals Chamber grants Blagoje Simic's motion to be provisionally released from 4 to 7 November 2004 to attend services marking the 40-day commemoration of his father's death. Simic is serving a 17-year sentence for crimes against humanity.

21 October 2004: The Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH) Parliamentary House of Peoples adopts a set of laws designed to facilitate the transfer of ICTY war crimes trials to domestic courts.

19 October 2004: Serbia refuses to arrest four generals indicted on four counts of crimes against humanity (deportation, murder, persecution, other inhumane acts [forcible transfer]), and one count of the violation of the laws and customs of war (murder) connected to the expulsion of Kosovo Albanians in 1999. Army chief of staff Nebojsa Pavkovic; his deputy, Vladimir Lazarevic; and police generals Vlastimir Djordjevic and Sreten Lukic are charged both as participants in a joint criminal enterprise and with superior responsibilty for the crimes of their subordinates. Djordjevic is believed to be hiding in Russia, while the others have been seen living openly in Serbia.

19 October 2004: In the Milosevic case, the trial adjourns for a week after half of the 138 defense witnesses called to testify about alleged atrocities in Kosovo refuse to appear in protest against the Tribunal's decision to impose counsel on Milosevic. Presiding Judge Robinson says that the Tribunal will use its subpoena power to force their testimony if necessary.

12 October 2004: In the Beara case, Ljubisa Beara makes his initial appearance but does not enter a plea after his transfer by Serbian authorities to the Tribunal. Beara is one of the most senior Bosnian Serb army officers yet to appear. He is charged as a participant in a joint criminal enterprise with one count of genocide, four counts of crimes against humanity (extermination, murder, persecution, and other inhumane acts [forcible transfer]) and one count of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder) arising from the attack on the town of Srebrenica in 1995. His indictment was confirmed in 2002 and he was apprehended on 9 October 2004.

12 October 2004: In the Milosevic case, the trial resumes.

12 October 2004: The Tribunal makes public the indictment, warrant for arrest, and order for surrender for Miroslav Bralo, a former member of the Bosnian Croat (HVO) forces. Bralo was secretly indicted in November 1995 on nine counts of grave breaches of the Geneva conventions and twelve counts of violations of the laws or customs of war. He is charged with direct participation in the unlawful confinement, inhumane and cruel treatment, torture, rape, and murder of Bosnian Muslim civilians in the villages in the Lasva River Valley region in central Bosnia and Herzegovina.

9 October 2004: In Foca, Bosnia and Herzegovina, a conference is held in which senior ICTY personnel provide a detailed and comprehensive picture of the Tribunal's activities in relation to allegations of serious violations of international humanitarian law in Foca during the 1992-1995 armed conflict. Foca was the site of some of the most infamous gender-related crimes of the war.

6 October 2004: In the Oric case, the trial of former Bosnian Muslim militia leader Naser Oric begins. Oric is charged with two counts of violations of the laws and customs of war on the basis of individual criminal responsibility (plunder, wanton destruction) and four counts on the basis of superior criminal responsibility (murder, cruel treatment, plunder, wanton destruction) pursuant to his command of units in Srebrenica between 24 September 1992 and 20 March 1993.

1 October 2004: Following a meeting between the chief prosecutor of the ICTY Carla Del Ponte and Serbia's special court for war crimes and organized crime, Del Ponte announces the transfer of investigative responsibility in an ICTY case to Serbian prosecutors for the first time. No details are provided regarding which case will be transferred. So far, no other former Yugoslav republic has been given responsibility for an ongoing UN investigation of a war crimes suspect indicted by the ICTY.

1 October 2004: The ICTY Rules of the Road program, in which the ICTY Office of the Prosecutor initially reviews all war crimes' prosecutions that are to be conducted at the domestic level in Bosnia and Herzegovina, is transferred to the competency of the Bosnia and Herzegovina State Court. Since its establishment in 1996, the program has received criminal files against a total of 5,908 persons suspected of war crimes.

30 September 2004: The Serbian government decides to provide guarantees to the ICTY for the release of Blagoje Simic on bail. Simic voluntarily surrendered to the ICTY on March 12, 2001.

29 September -1 October 2004: In the Blagojevic and Jokic cases, the Trial Chamber hears closing arguments.

22 September 2004: In the Mejakic case, President Meron presents the prosecution with issues for clarification regarding the capacity of Bosnia and Herzegovina to provide trials that meet the standards of international due process. Specifically, he asks for evidence that Bosnia and Herzegovina would provide all necessary legal and technical conditions for fair trials, and of the extent to which the country is capable of referring defendant's case to a competent court.

13 September 2004: A conference begins between the ICTY Victim and Witnesses Section and health/welfare professionals from Kosovo and Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (FYROM) to discuss the physical, emotional and psychological needs of witnesses. The purpose of the conference is to find ways in which the establishment of health care networks throughout Kosovo and FYROM can assist in providing preparation and follow-up services to witnesses who testify at the Tribunal. Since 1 January 1998, more than 3,268 witnesses have testified before a Trial Chamber of the ICTY.

13 September 2004: ICTY dismisses a comment made by Dragan Covic, the Croat member of the Bosnian State Presidency, that the ICTY trial of six Bosnian Croats will probably transfer to Croatian courts.

15 September 2004: In Milosevic case, the Trial Chamber denies the defense requests for a further medical examination of the accused and to have the accused examine the witnesses before the Court assigns defense counsel. The defense counsels' request to be relieved from their positions is also denied. The ICTY judges suspend the Milosevic trial until October 12, 2004, in response to the defense request for more time to prepare the case due to difficulties caused by Milosevic's refuseal to cooperate. Many defense witnesses have cancelled their appearance in show of support to his claim to the right of self-representation.

14-15 September: Trial Chamber I Section A (Judges Liu, presiding, Vassylenko and Argibay), sitting on Blagojevic and Jokic trial, conduct an on-site visit to the municipalities of Srebrenica, Bratunac and Zvornik in Bosnia and Herzegovina. The visit is in response to a joint motion by the prosecution and defense on 2 June 2004, requesting the visit to assist the Trial Chamber in assessing the evidence and to obtain first-hand knowledge of the sites mentioned in the indictment and during the trial.

21 September 2004: Judges Hans Henrik Brydensholt of Denmark and Albin Eser of Germany are sworn in as ad litem judges, following their appointment by the Secretary General of the UN.

9 September 2004: The Appeals Chamber allows the provisional release of prisoners Jadranko Prlic, Bruno Stojic, Slobodan Praljak, Milivoj Petkovic, Valetin Coric and Berislav Pusic.

3 September 2004: ICTY Deputy Registrar assigns Steven Kay as lead counsel and Gillian Higgins as co-counsel for Slobodan Milosevic. Milosevic may still participate in the conduct of his case, including examining witnesses.

2 September 2004: Trial Chamber III issues an oral Order to the Registrar of the ICTY to assign counsel to Slobodan Milosevic.

1 September 2004: In the Brdjanin, the accused is convicted of war crimes and crimes against humanity (persecution; extermination; torture; deportation; inhumane acts (forcible transfer)), but cleared of the charge of genocide. Brdjanin, a prominent member of Radovan Karadzic's Serb Democrat Party, used propaganda campaigns against Bosnian Muslims and Bosnian Croats to further his goal of removing these groups from Bosnia, judges said. The acquittal on genocide charges means that the tribunal has yet to sustain a genocide charge against any of its indictees.

31 August 2004: The Milosevic trial resumes after numerous delays caused by the poor health of the defendant. Mr. Milosevic says he wants to call more than 1600 witnesses in the 150 days allotted to his defence, including Bill Clinton and Tony Blair.

30 August 2004: David Tolbert (United States) takes up duties as Deputy Prosecutor of the ICTY following his appointment by UN Secretary-General Mr. Kofi Annan.

30 July 2004: Trial Chamber 1 joins the cases of Mirko Norac and Rahim Ademi.

29 July 2004: The Appeals Chamber reverses the majority of charges on which Tihomir Blaskic was originally convicted and sentences him to nine years imprisonment, rather than 45 years. Recently released material from Croatian government archives largely exonerated him. Blaskic, who has been imprisoned since 1996, is granted early release.

23 July 2004: In the Hadzihasanovic and Kubura case, the Prosecution presents its closing arguments and rests its case.

23 July 2004: In the Blagojevic and Jokic case, the Defense for Dragan Jokic rests. The trial is adjourned until September 2004.

20 July 2004: In the Hadzic case, Chief Prosecutor Carla del Ponte blasts the Government of Serbia and Montenegro for its failure to arrest Goran Hadzic. According to del Ponte, the Government of Serbia and Montenegro had received a sealed arrest warrant for Hadzic three days prior to its being made public this week. Hadzic had been living openly in Serbia. Within hours of the arrest warrant arriving in Belgrade, the Prosecutor says Hadzic went into hiding, apparently tipped off that his arrest was imminent. Del Ponte says this is the second time this year that an indictee, who's whereabouts were known by Serbian officials, went into hiding hours after a sealed arrest warrant was received by the Serbian government, but before official could make an arrest. She says that if the Government of Serbia and Montenegro doesn't arrest Hadzic soon and transfer him to the Hague, she will be forced to report to the UN Security Council that Serbia and Montenegro is not fulfilling its obligation to cooperate.

16 July 2004: The Tribunal announces the indictment of Goran Hadzic. The former president of the self-declared Republic of Serbian Krajina (RSK) is charged with eight counts of crimes against humanity (persecution, murder, extermination, imprisonment, torture, deportation, inhumane acts, and forcible transfer as an inhumane act) and six counts of war crimes (murder, torture, cruel treatment, wanton destruction, plunder, and destruction or damage to institutions dedicated to education or religion).

16 July 2004: In the Milosevic case, the Trial Chamber adjourns proceedings until 31 August 2004 after receiving reports from Slobodan Milosevic's doctor saying that his blood pressure was too high for him to attend the proceedings schedule to begin 19 July.

12 July 2004: In the Milosevic case, hearings are further adjourned until 19 July to allow time for a second cardiologist to report on Slobodan Milosevic's fitness to continue with the trial.

8 July 2004: In the Norac case, retired Croatian General Mirko Norac pleads not guilty to two counts of crimes against humanity (murder, persecution) and two counts of war crimes (murder, plunder). Norac is currently serving a 12-year prison sentence in Croatia on other war-related charges and was transferred to the Tribunal earlier in the day to attend the hearing. Following the hearing, the Judge orders that Norac will be remanded into the custody of the Croatian Government, under the Tribunal's authority, during the pre-trial phase of his case.

6 July 2004: In the Vasiljevic case, Mitar Vasiljevic is transferred to Austria to serve his sentence. Vasiljevic was convicted in November 2002 of crimes against humanity (murder and inhumane acts) and violations of the laws and customs of war (murder) and sentenced to 20 years in prison. That sentence was reduced to 15 years on appeal in February 2004.

6 July 2004: In the Milosevic case, the judges order Slobodan Milosevic to undergo new medical test by an independent cardiologist. The judges say they can see no evidence that Milosevic is unfit to stand trial, but that there is evidence his health may make him unfit to continue to represent himself. The case is adjourned until 14 July.

5 July 2004: In the Milosevic case, the scheduled start of the Defense case is postponed due to Slobodan Milosevic's ill health.

1 July 2004: Sir Richard May, a former judge on the Milosevic case, dies at the age of 65. May had retired from the ICTY on 30 May of this year citing poor health.

1 July 2004: In the Blagojevic and Jokic case, the Defense for Dragan Jokic makes its opening statements.

30 June 2004: In the Seselj case, communications restriction against Vojislav Seselj are lifted. The original communication restrictions were put in place in December 2003 and had been continually renewed until this time. Seselj is warned that direct or indirect communication with the media is still prohibited and that any contact with the media will result in a reinstating of the communication restrictions.

30 June 2004: The internationally recognized High Representative in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Paddy Ashdown, sacks 60 Bosnian Serb officials for their part in failing to arrest ICTY-fugitive Radovan Karadizc. Among those dismissed are BiH's Parliamentary Speaker and the country's Interior and Police Ministers. The Dayton Peace Accords, which ended the war in Bosnia, give the High Representative far-reaching powers.

30 June 2004: Chief Prosecutor Carla del Ponte tells the UN Security Council that the ICTY is currently considering 12 cases, concerning 22 defendants, to determine whether they could be transferred to domestic jurisdictions in other states. She warned, however, that even if all 12 were transferred, the court still might not be able to meet its 2008 deadline for completion of all trials.

29 June 2004: In the Babic case, Milan Babic is sentenced to 13 years in prison. Babic plead guilty to one count of crimes against humanity (persecution) in January 2004. The Trial Chamber cites Babic's voluntary surrender to the Tribunal, his guilty plea, his remorse, and his extensive cooperation with the Prosecution in other cases as mitigating circumstances in the sentencing judgment. The Prosecution had asked for a sentence of no more than 11 years, but the Trial Chamber says that request was not a sufficient punishment to achieve justice.

25 June 2004: In the Krajisnik case, the trial is adjourned until September 2004.

18 June 2004: In the Obrenovic case, Dragan Obrenovic is transferred to Norway to serve the remainder of his 17-year sentence. Obrenovic was sentenced in December 2003 after pleading guilty to one count of crimes against humanity (persecution).

17 June 2004: The Tribunal now has the option to defer cases to any UN member state deemed to have jurisdiction, willingness and appropriate conditions to hold the trial. The amendment to rule 11 bis of the ICTY's Rules and Procedures, which goes into effect today, could apply to both ongoing cases and trials that have not yet stared. Under the new rule, any case under consideration for deferment to another state must first be approved by a specially appointed Trial Chamber at the ICTY. The Trial Chamber must be satisfied that the accused can receive a fair trial and that there is absolutely no chance that the death penalty might be imposed. This disqualifies any country that allows capital punishment from receiving a deferred case.

17 June 2004: In the Milosevic case, Slobodan Milosevic asks the Tribunal to order former US President Bill Clinton, German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder, and British Prime Minister Tony Blair to appear as witnesses in his case. The judge told Milosevic that all such requests need to be submitted to the court in writing if they are to be considered. Milosevic, who refuses to acknowledge the legitimacy of the Tribunal, says he has no intention of submitting anything in writing.

16 June 2004: In the Pavkovic et al. case, former Serbian General Vlastimir Djordjevic surfaces after three years in hiding, saying that he is willing to stand trial in Serbia, but not at the ICTY. Djordjevic, who fled Serbia in 2001 fearing that he might be indicted by the ICTY made this statement in a letter to a Russian newspaper. His stance is similar to those of his co-Accused in the Pavkovic et al. case who are all living openly in Serbia and insist they did nothing wrong.

16 June 2004: In the Milsosevic case, the Tribunal rejects a defense motion to have genocide charges against Slobodan Milosevic dropped. The judges ruled that there was sufficient evidence in the case for Milosevic to answer, despite arguments from Milosevic's standby council that the prosecution had failed to prove a case of genocide.

10 June 2004: In the Seselj case, the communications restrictions placed on Vojislav Seselj are extended until 1 July, 2004. The Registrar deemed it necessary to continue the restrictions in light of the scheduled Serbian elections on 13 June with possible follow-up elections later in the month. The Registrar noted Seselj's continued attempts to affect Serbian politics through contact with the media and others outside of the detention unit in imposing the extension.

10 June 2004: In the Milosevic case, Judge Iain Bonomy is officially appointed to the bench seat vacated by Judge Richard May. Judge Bonomy certifies that he has familiarized himself with the record of the case's proceedings.

7 June 2004: Lord Iain Bonomy is sworn in as a judge of the ICTY. Judge Bonomy (UK) replaces Judge Richard May (UK) who stepped down May 31 for health reasons.

7 June 2004: A three-day conference with officials from The ICTY Victims and Witnesses Section (VWS) and mental health professionals from Croatia begins. The conference is aimed at establishing preparatory and follow-up assistance to witnesses from Croatia who will come to the Tribunal to give testimony. These services are designed to supplement the mental health services the witnesses receive while in the Hague.

2 June 2004: In the Kovacevic case, the Tribunal orders the provisional release of Vladamir Kovacevic on medical grounds. The Tribunal ruled that he "suffers from a serious mental disorder which presently renders him unfit to enter a plea or to stand trial." Kovacevic will return to Serbia and Montenegro for an initial period of six months where it is hoped that treatment in a Serbian-speaking environment may improve his condition.

28 May 2004: Dusko Jovanovic, the newspaper editor who's contempt charges at the ICTY were withdrawn in April, is shot dead in Montenegro. Jovanovic had been charged with contempt for disclosing the name of a protected witness in the Milosevic case. There was no immediate word of a motive, though his newspaper is controversial for its close ties with the party of former President Slobodan Milosevic and is currently involved in several libel suits.

26 May 2004: In the Strugar case, the Tribunal denies a Defense motion to terminate proceedings against Pavle Strugar due to his not being fit to stand trial. The Defense had argued that the Defendant's mental and physical state made it impossible for him to assist adequately in his own defense.

20 May 2004: Former Croatian General Mirko Norac is indicted by the Tribunal. His indictment, confirmed today, charges two counts of crimes against humanity (persecution, murder) and three counts of war crimes (murder; plunder; wanton destruction of cities, towns or villages) for crimes committed in the Medak Pocket in 1993. Norac is currently serving a 12-year sentence in a Croatian jail for charges surrounding the killing more than 50 Croatian Serb civilians in 1991.

18 May 2004: In the Strugar case, the Prosecution rests its case. The Defense is scheduled to begin its case on 28 June 2004

24 May 2004: A three-day conference between officials of ICTY's Victim and Witness Unit and health/welfare professionals from Serbia-Montenegro begins. The conference is aimed at strengthening service for witnesses from Serbia-Montenegro who come to the Tribunal to testify. The major topic of discussion is how to set up preparatory and follow-up services in Serbia-Montenegro to supplement those services witnesses currently receive while they are in the Hague.

21 May 2004: Representatives from the ICTY participate in a two-day training program for judges and prosecutors involved in war crimes trials in Croatia's newly established war crimes court. Among the topics included in the training are definitions of crimes under international and local laws, forms of criminal responsibility and association, investigation procedures, drafting of indictments, witness protection issues, and cooperation between the ICTY and the Croatian courts over issues of evidence.

14 May 2004: A delegation of judges and prosecutors from Serbia-Montenegro's Special Court for War Crimes (SCWC) wraps up a three-day visit to the ICTY. The SCWC is preparing to conduct its own war crimes trials in Belgrade. This visit gave the judges and prosecutors a chance to talk with their counterparts at the ICTY and discuss many relevant topics including cooperation between the two courts, the drafting of indictments, methods of evidence, and the concepts of command responsibility and joint criminal enterprise.

12 May 2004: In the Milutinvoic et al. case, Defense attorneys for Dragoljub Ojdanic say they do not have enough money to adequately prepare his defense. The Defense claims that it has been working pro bono since April 2003, when the Tribunal's approved funding for Ojdanic's defense ran out. The Registry and the Appeals Chamber have already rejected a request for additional funding.

11 May 2004: The European Union says Serbia-Montenegro's failure to cooperate fully with the ICTY is jeopardizing its chances at becoming a member of the EU. The EU's Commissioner for External Relations says Serbia-Montenegro must choose between protecting those accused of war crimes and joining the EU.

8 May 2004: The ICTY's Outreach Program conducts the first of several planned conferences in Bosnia-Herzegovina. The one-day conference in Brcko brought together local Bosnian villagers and officials who are affected by ongoing trials at the ICTR. Tribunal officials explained the investigation process, the Prosecutor's strategy, and what evidence has been presented in cases relevant to the area.

7 May 2004: In the Seselj case, the Registry extends the existing communications restrictions on Vojislav Seselj until 13 June 2004. Seselj has been limited to communication with his attorneys and diplomatic representatives and to monitored communication with his family.

5 May 2004: In the Milosevic case, the Tribunal releases portions of a Prosecution motion responding to an amici curiae filed in March seeking to have the genocide charges against Slobodan Milosevic dropped due to lack of evidence. The Prosecution's motion, which was also submitted in March, claims that while the Prosecution may have cut its case short in the interests of time, it did present enough evidence to prove genocidal intent. The Tribunal has yet to rule on the issue.

5 May 2004: In the Milosevic case, the Tribunal announces that the start of the Defense case will be pushed back two weeks due to Slobodan Milosevic's ill-health and to allow more time for the translation of documents. Milosevic, who is defending himself, was originally scheduled to begin putting on his defense on 8 June, however the trial is now set to resume on 22 June 2004.

4 May 2004: ICTY officials tell the UN Security Council that Serbia-Montenegro's cooperation with the Tribunal is "nearly non-existent." Tribunal President Theodor Meron says that some of the major areas of concern are the failure to arrest fugitives, lack of access to witnesses and documentation, and the failure to grant witnesses waivers of immunity for their testimony at the ICTY.

22 April 2004: In the Bradjanin case, closing arguments come to an end. No date has yet been set for a judgment.

19 April 2004: In the Krstic case, the Appeals Chamber reversed the Trial Chamber's judgment convicting Radislav Krstic of genocide, instead finding him guilty of aiding and abetting genocide. The Appeals Chamber finds that the Prosecution did not adequately prove Kristic's intent to destroy the population at issue in whole or in part. Krstic had been the first person convicted of genocide at the ICTY. The Appeals Chamber reduces his sentence to from 46 to 35 years imprisonment. While reducing Krstic's level of responsibility in the case, the judges unequivocally maintained that genocide had occurred in Srebrenica in 1995, despite claims that the number of those killed was too low. The judges maintained that the mass killing of Muslim men and boys put the community's very survival at stake.

19 April 2004: In the Jovanovic case, the Tribunal withdraws the indictment against Dusko Jovanovic. Jovanovic, the editor of the DAN newspaper, was indicted last year for contempt of court after publishing the name of a protected witness in the Milosevic case.

15 April 2004: Serbia's highest court temporarily blocks legislation, passed last month, that would have used taxpayers' money to pay for Serbian ICTY indictees' defense, supported their families and compensated them for lost wages.

14 April 2004: In the Blagojevic and Jokic case, the defense counsel for Vidoje Blagojevic gives his opening statement.

13 April 2004: In the Milosevic case, Slobodon Milosevic submits the list of witnesses he wishes to call in his defense. The list has 1,631 names on it, which is twice the number of witnesses the Prosecution called during the presentation of its case. Among the witnesses reportedly on the list are former US President Clinton and current British Prime Minister Tony Blair and French President Jacques Chirac. The judges in the case will have the final say as to which witnesses will be allowed to testify.

12 April 2004: In the Milosevic case, Lord Iain Bonomy (UK) is appointed to the ICTY to replace Judge Richard May (UK), who will retire at the end of May for health reasons. Lord Bonomy, a former criminal prosecutor and judge from Scotland, will officially take up his duties on 1 June.

6 April 2004: ICTY permanent judges amend Rule 28 (A) of the Tribunal's Rules of Procedure and Evidence to include a procedure to determine whether new indictments focus on the most senior leaders who bear the greatest responsibility for crimes within the Tribunal's jurisdiction. The amendment follows the UN Security Council adoption of resolution 1534 on 26 March 2004, calling for the Tribunal to concentrate its new indictments on such leaders.

6 April 2004: In the Prlic et al. case, Jadranko Prlic, Bruno Stojic, Slobodan Praljak, Milivoj Petkovic, Valentin Coric, and Berislav Pusic make their initial appearance before the Tribunal. The indictments for Prlic, Stojic, Praljak, and Petkovic were made public on 2 April, and the indictments for Coric and Pusic were made public on 5 April. All pleaded not guilty to all 26 counts in the Indictment.

5 April 2004: In the Pralic et al. case, the indictments against two other high ranking Bosnian Croats, Valentin Coric and Berislav Pusic, are unsealed. They are charged with the same 26 counts alleged against Jadranko Prlic, Bruno Stojic, Slobodan Praljak and Milivoj Petkovic. Coric and Pusic had been included in the Prlic et al. indictment, but until today, their names had been redacted.

5 April 2004: In the Blagojevic and Jokic case, the Trial Chamber acquits Vidoje Blagojevic of individual criminal responsibility on five counts: crimes against humanity (extermination, murder, persecutions, and inhumane acts) and violations of the laws of war (murder). Dragan Jokic is acquitted of individual criminal responsibility for crimes against humanity (extermination, murder, and persecutions) and violations of the laws of war (murder). These acquittals are in response to a defense motion that the Prosecution failed to present sufficient evidence to justify the charges. The trial continues on the remaining counts of the indictment.

2 April 2004: The indictments against four high-ranking former Bosnian Croat political and military leaders, Jadranko Prlic, Bruno Stojic, Slobodan Praljak and Milivoj Petkovic, are unsealed. They are charged with 26 counts each: 8 counts of crimes against humanity (persecution, murder, rape, deportation, imprisonment, and 3 counts of inhumane acts), 9 counts of grave breaches of the Geneva Conventions (willful killing, unlawful deportation, unlawful transfer, unlawful confinement, unlawful and wanton destruction of property, unlawful appropriation of property, and 3 counts of inhuman treatment), and 9 counts of war crimes (unlawful labour; wanton destruction of cities, towns or villages; destruction or willful damage to religious or educational institutions; plunder; unlawful attack on civilians; terror on civilians; and 3 counts of cruel treatment).

31 March 2004: In the Mrdja case, Darko Mrdja is sentenced to 17 years imprisonment. Mrdja pleaded guilty in July 2003 to one count of war crimes (murder) and one count of crimes against humanity (inhumane acts). In deciding his sentence, the Tribunal cited as aggravating factors the special vulnerability of the victims at the time of the commission of the crime and the particularly high level of suffering inflicted upon them. Mrdja's substantial cooperation with the Prosecution, his guilty plea, and his remorse were cited as mitigating factors.

30 March 2004: In the Deronjic case, Miroslav Deronjic was sentenced to 10 years imprisonment. Deronjic plead guilty in September 2003 to a crime against humanity (persecutions). The Presiding judge in the case, Judge Schomburg, issued a dissent on the sentencing judgment, saying that Deronjic deserved no less than 20 years in prison.

30 March 2004: The Serbian legislature passes the Act on the Rights of Hague Tribunal Indictees. The act provides for funds to pay salaries and allowances to the families of Serbian indictees at the ICTY and to cover legal fees and travel expenses for family visits.

29 March 2004: In the Milosevic case, the Tribunal has decided to continue the case with a new judge after the resignation of Judge Richard May, despite a lack of consent from the Accused. There was earlier speculation that the trial might have to start from scratch.

26 March 2004: The UN Security Council adopts Resolution 1534, which calls for the ICTY to concentrate its new indictments solely on the most senior leaders who bear the greatest responsibility for atrocities in the former Yugoslavia.

25 March 2004: In the Milosevic case, the Tribunal ruled that Slobodan Milosevic's refusal to comment on the plan to replace one of the judges hearing the case amounts to his refusing to grant consent. Faced with this lack of consent, the Trial Chamber will now have to decide whether the interests of justice would allow the ICTY to continue the trial with a substitute judge or to declare a mistrial and order a retrial. The case has already been going on for over two years. Judge Richard May will be resigning at the end of May due to health reasons.

19 March: In the Maglov case, the Trial Chamber grants a defense motion to drop one count against Milka Maglov. The Chamber said the Prosecution had no case with regard to the allegation that Maglov disclosed the whereabouts of a witness to the public in violation of an order of another Trial Chamber. Maglov, a former defense attorney in the Brdjanin case, is still charged with intimidating a witness, attempting to intimidate a witness and disclosing the identity of a witness to the public.

19 March 2004: In the Brdjanin case, the Appeals Chamber re-instates one count of genocide against Radoslav Brdjanin, which had initially been dropped by the Trial Chamber. In November 2003, the Trial Chamber agreed with a Defense motion that the Prosecution did not have sufficient evidence to justify a charge of genocide.

18 March 2004: In the Jokic case, Miodrag Jokic was sentenced to seven years imprisonment. In August 2003, Jokic plead guilty to six counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder, cruel treatment, attacks on civilians, unjustified devastation, unlawful attacks, and destruction of institutions dedicated to religion, charity, and education).

17 March 2004: The ICTY pays formal tribute to Judge Richard May to thank him for his seven years of service to the Tribunal, wishing him well in his retirement and a speedy recovery. Last month, Judge May announced his retirement, due to ill health, effective May 31.

16 March 2004: In the Brdjanin case, three judges visit the sites of detention camps in Bosnia to gather information relevant to the trial.

12 March 2004: In the Hadzihasanovic and >Kubara case, Amir Kubura is granted provisional release beginning 13 March to attend his mother's funeral. He is ordered to be back in The Hague by 15 March.

12 March 2004: In the Cermak and Markac case, the defendants Ivan Cermak and Mladan Markac plead not guilty to four counts of crimes against humanity (persecution, deportation, and two counts of other inhumane acts) and three counts of war crimes (murder, plunder of property, and wanton destruction).

11 March 2004: In the Cesic case, Ranko Cesic is sentenced to 18 years imprisonment. Cesic was indicted for and plead guilty to two twelve charges: six counts of crimes against humanity (5 of murder and 1 of rape) and six counts of war crimes (5 of murder and 1 of humiliating and degrading treatment). Cesic's guilty plea, along with his willingness to help the Prosecution and to testify in other trials, were noted as mitigating factors in the sentencing decision.

11 March 2004: The United Kingdom signs an agreement on the enforcement of sentences handed down by the ICTY. The UK is the 10th state to sign an enforcement agreement and the first common law state to do so.

11 March 2004: In the Milosevic case, the Tribunal decides not to extend the communications restrictions placed on Slobodan Milosevic, which have been in place since 11 December 2003. Milosevic is warned, however, that direct or indirect communication with the media is prohibited and any violation of that rule will result in the restrictions being reinstated.

11 March 2004: In the Kvocka, et al. case, Miroslav Kvocka's provisional release is revoked beginning 19 March in preparation for his appeal hearing. He is ordered to turn himself in to ICTY detention by that date.

9 March 2004: In the Jokic case, Miodrag Jokic is ordered to return to The Hague by 16 March, ending his provisional release. Jokic's sentenced is to be announced 18 March.

8 March 2004: Croatian Generals Ivan Cermak and Mladan Markac are indicted by the ICTY. They are both charged with four counts of crimes against humanity (persecution, deportation, and two counts of other inhumane acts) and three counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (plunder, wanton destruction, and murder).

6 March 2004: In the Milosevic case, the Prosecution releases over 400,000 pages of documents to Slobodan Milosevic that may contain potentially exculpatory evidence for use in his defense. The search for these documents has cost over $1.5 million and has been complicated by the fact that the accused has refused to formally state his defense, leaving the Prosecution with the job of having to guess the various defenses he could use and looking for documents that might be exculpatory for those defenses.

5 March 2004: In the Milosevic case, two court-appointed legal advisors to Slobodan Milosevic file an application with the Tribunal asking them to drop the genocide charges against him because the Prosecution failed to provide enough evidence to justify such a charge.

3 March 2004: In the Galic case, the Prosecution says it will appeal Stanislav Galic's December 2003 sentence. It seeks life in prison rather than the Trial Chamber's sentence of 20 years.

26 February 2004: In the Milosevic case, the Trial Chamber elects Judge Patrick Robinson as presiding judge for Trial Chamber III. Judge Robinson, who has been on the Milosevic case since its start two years ago, will fill the presiding chair being vacated by Judge Richard May. A new trial judge to replace Judge May on the case has yet to be appointed.

25 February 2004: In the Milosevic case, the Defense will begin presenting its case on 8 June 2004. The Trial Chamber is changing the date due to the Prosecution's decision to wrap up its case earlier than expected. Slobodan Milosevic, who is acting as his own lawyer, will have 150 days to complete his case.

25 February 2004: In the Milosevic case, the Trial Chamber accepts the Prosecution's motion to end their case immediately despite having four more witnesses to call and more evidence to admit. The Court will allow the Prosecution to admit some, but not all of the evidence in question, allowing the Defense to submit a written response to the disputed evidence. The decision was made after Judge Richard May announced his resignation from the Tribunal due to ill health and because hearings had been cancelled for the past two weeks due to Slobodan Milosevic's ill health.

25 February 2004: In the Vasiljevic case, the Appeals Chamber reduces Mitar Vasiljevic's sentence from 20 to 15 years in prison. Vasiljevic was convicted of crimes against humanity (murder and inhumane acts) and violations of the laws and customs of war (murder). The reduction is a result of the Appeals Chamber finding that Vasiljevic aided and abetted these crimes instead of acting as a co-perpetrator as the Trial Chamber had found.

24 February 2004: In the Milosevic case, the hearings scheduled for today and tomorrow are cancelled due to the ill health of the Accused.

23 February 2004: Proceedings are cancelled in the Milosevic case due to the ill-health of the accused. The Prosecution will resume its case on 24 and 25 February.

22 February 2004: Judge Richard May announces his resignation from the Tribunal due to ill health, effective 31 May 2004. Appointed in November 1997, Judge May is the presiding judge of the Milosevic case. It is unclear whether this will give Slobodan Milosevic grounds for a retrial.

21 February 2004: Serbian Prime Minister-designate Vojislav Kostunica says that extradition of people accused of war crimes by ICTY would not be a priority for his government and, specifically, that his government will not extradite four senior police and army officers indicted by the Tribunal last September.

19 February 2004: The Kosovo Assembly approves a law on cooperation with the ICTY. The law establishes an official link between the Hague-based Tribunal and Kosovo, paving the way for indicted Kosovars to receive institutionalized support and assistance at the Tribunal. The UN Mission in Kosovo (UNMIK) claims the Assembly overstepped its bounds in approving the law because only the UN Civilian Administrator has the authority to adopt such laws.

19 February 2004: In the Deronjic case, the Trial Chamber orders that a new sentencing hearing be held for Miroslav Deronjic. This order comes after the Trial Chamber found inconsistencies among the indictment, Deronjic's statements made at the sentencing hearing and witness testimony he gave at other trials. The Trial Chamber says they want to ensure the veracity of the guilty plea and its validity according to the Rules of Procedure and Evidence. The new hearing is scheduled to begin on March 5.

18 February 2004: In the Milosevic case, proceedings are cancelled for today and 19 February due to the ill-health of the accused.

16 February 2004: In the Maglov contempt case, a former defense attorney in the Brdjanin case pleads not guilty to an amended indictment that charges her with intimidating a witness, attempting to intimidate a witness and disclosing the identity and whereabouts of a witness to the public. Testimony is expected through 20 February.

16 February 2004: In Mrksic et al. case, Miroslav Radic and Veslein Sljivancanin plead not guilty to all charges in a new consolidated indictment, including crimes against humanity (persecution, murder, extermination, torture and inhumane acts) and violations of the laws and customs of war (murder, torture, cruel treatment).

13 February 2004: In the Milosevic case, former Bosnian-Serb President Biljana Plavsic will not testify even after being transported to the Hague from prison in Sweden. The decision was made by ICTY Prosecutor Carla del Ponte in light of the limited time the Prosecution has left to conclude its case.

12 February 2004: The Milosevic case marks it two-year anniversary. The Prosecution is due to conclude its case next week. Since the start of the trial, the Prosecution has called nearly 300 witnesses.

11 February 2004: In the Gotovina case, ICTY Prosecutor Carla del Pontes submits an amended indictment against Ante Gotovina to the Tribunal but refuses to say publicly how it has been amended. Del Ponte also says she believes Gotovina is living in Croatia.

10 February 2004: Britain, backed by the United States, submits a draft resolution to the Security Council, proposing a reconfiguration of the ICTY and the relative powers of the Prosecutor and the Tribunal Judges. The resolution would allow the judges to deny indictments submitted to them by the Prosecutor if they feel the suspect is not senior enough. No date has yet been set for a vote on the resolution.

9 February 2004: In the Milosevic and Seselj cases, the ICTY Deputy Registrar extends the communication restrictions placed on Slobodan Milosevic and Vojislav Selelj for another 30 days, noting their refusal to fully cooperate with the Tribunal. The only change is that Milosevic, who is acting as his own lawyer, will be allowed the communications necessary to conduct investigations related to his defense. The restrictions were first imposed in December 2003.

7 February 2004: In the Gotovina case, Ante Gotovina issues a statement to the Croatian newspaper Vercernji List saying once again that he will give himself up only in the charges against him are dropped. He says he will answer questions only if he is seen and treated simply as a suspect rather than an indictee. His statement was in response to a Croatian Deputy Prime Minster urging Gotovina to turn himself in. ITCY Chief Prosecutor Carla del Ponte has said Gotovina would be allowed to defend himself without being taken into custody if he surrendered.

6 February 2004: In the Maglov contempt case, the allegations against Milka Maglov are amended. The former ICTY defense attorney will now be charged with intimidating a witness, attempting to intimidate a witness and disclosing the identity and whereabouts of a witness to the public.

5 February 2004: In the Milosevic case, prosecutors have been given until 19 February to end their case. The court has authorized longer days in these next few weeks in order for the Prosecution to be able to meet that deadline.

5 February 2004: Chief Prosecutor Carla del Ponte announces that the Tribunal will issue eight or nine new indictments against Bosnia-Herzegovina nationals, Bosniaks (Bosnian Moslems), and Croats.

3 February 2004: In the Strugar case, Pavle Strugar's lawyers ask that his trial be adjourned on medical grounds. They claim they are having trouble communicating with Strugar and a report by his psychiatrist claims that Strugar is mentally unfit to stand trial.

3 February 2004: The Krajisnik trial begins following a nine month delay. Momcilo Krajisnik's trial was originally set to begin in May 2003, but his defense attorney was temporarily suspended from the New York Bar shortly before the start of the trial. Krajisnik is charged with eights counts: genocide, complicity in genocide, crimes against humanity (persecution, murder, extermination, deportation, inhumane acts) and war crimes (murder).

02 February 2004: In the Milosevic case, Chief Prosecutor Carla del Ponte warns Belgrade that their refusal to hand over documents is jeopardizing the genocide case against Slobodan Milosevic. She claims to know exactly which documents are missing and where they are.

31 January 2004: In the Gotovina search, Chief Prosecutor Carla del Ponte says that she will allow Ante Gotovina to defend himself without being held in custody if he turns himself in.

30 January 2004: In the Mrksic case, Mile Mrksic is granted a temporary provisional release to attend his mother's funeral in Belgrade. His release begins 31 January and he is ordered to be back by 2 February. As a condition of his release, an official of the Government of Serbia and Montenegro must escort Mrksic until he returns to The Hague.

28 January 2004: In the Babic case, the Court accepts the plea agreement between Milan Babic and the Prosecution. Under the agreement, Babic will plea guilty to one count of crime against humanity (persecutions) and testify in future trials. In exchange, the Prosecution will drop four other charges of war crimes against Babic. A sentencing hearing is set for 1 February.

28 January 2004: In the Deronjic case, Miroslav Deronjic's sentencing hearing wraps up. Deronjic entered into a plea agreement in September 2003 where he agreed to plea guilty to one count of crimes against humanity (persecution) as well as to testify in other trials. During the 2-day hearing, the Prosecution recommended that Deronjic receive a sentence of ten years imprisonment, while the Defense called for six years.

27 January 2004: Chief Prosecutor Carla Del Ponte insists that NATO will capture ICTY Fugitive Radovan Karadzic before the end of the year, despite remarks to the contrary by hear Deputy. Ms. Del Ponte insists that Deputy Prosecutor Graham Belwitt's remarks yesterday that the West did not possess the political will to capture Karadzic did not reflect the position of the Court. Instead she predicted that Karadzic would be captured before the end of the year.

26 January 2004: Deputy prosecutor Graham Blewitt says he feels the West does not have the political will to arrest ICTY Fugitive Radovan Karadzic. In recent weeks, NATO forces have launched several failed raids in Bosnia hoping to capture Karadzic. Karadzic was the first person indicted by the ICTY and is on the top of its most-wanted list.

24 January 2004: The U.S. Senate passes legislation requiring Serbia to do everything possible to arrest ICTY fugitive Ratko Mladic and conditioning $100 million in U.S. aid on its efforts to do so. Unlike previous U.S. initiatives, the latest law does not insist that Mladic is in Serbia, only that the Serbia must do everything possible to arrest him if he is.

21 January 2004: The Court grants Simo Zaric's application for early release citing the fact that he has served over two-thirds of his sentence, his commitment to being reintegrated into society, and his good behavior while imprisoned. Zaric was convicted of one count of crimes against humanity (persecution) and sentenced to six years in prison. He is set to be freed on 28 January.

20 January 2004: In the Milosevic case, the Appeals Chamber dismissed an appeal asking it to grant Slobodan Milosevic more time to prepare his appeal. The Decision upholds the Trail Chamber's earlier ruling granting Milosevic three months to prepare his defense once the Prosecution rests. Milosevic originally requested two years to prepare.

18 January 2004: In the Hadzihasanovic case, Enver Hadzihasanovic was granted provisional release to attend his brother's funeral. He is ordered to return to ICTY Detention on 20 January.

16 January 2004: The Brdjanin case was adjourned until February 9.

16 January 2004: In the Nikolic case, Dragan Nikolic files a notice of appeal on his sentencing. Nikolic was sentenced to 23 years in prison following a plea agreement last year.

13 January 2004: The Milosevic trial resumed after the three-week holiday. With only 15 trial days left for its case in chief, the Prosecution is expected to focus on the charge of genocide.

12 January 2004: Arrest warrants for 12 ICTY fugitives are re-issued, at the request of the Prosecutor. Judge Liu Daqun reissues warrants against Ljubomir Borovcanin, Milan Lukis, Dragomire Milosevic, Sredoje Lukic, Vinko Pandurevic, Vujadin Popovic, Savo Todovic, Dragan Zelenovic, Stojan Zupljanin, Gojko Jankovic, Goran Borovnica, and Ljubisa Beara. Warrants for each of the accused had previously been issued, but by various judges and addressed either to the Prosecutor or a particular State. The re-issued warrants authorize any member State of the UN to arrest the accused and are all issued by a single judge.

11 January 2004: ICTY indictee Slobodan Milosevic's seat in the Serbian Parliament will be taken by another party member, the head of the Socialist Party announces. Milosevic, who is currently on trial at the ICTY, won the seat in last month's elections. Party officials maintain that the seat would be vacated for him if he were to be released by the Tribunal.

9 January 2004: The Registry has extended the communications restrictions placed on Vojislave Seselj and Slobodan Milosevic, due to expire 10 January, for another 30 days. The Registrar cited Seselj's blatant violations of the original restrictions as one reason for the extension. He also felt that allowing the two men to participate in post-election political activities would undermine the Tribunal's mandate to restore and maintain peace in the former Yugoslavia.

8 January 2004: ICTY detainee Vojislave Seselj will not be able to take up his seat in Parliament, despite his win in last month's Serbian elections. The head of Seselj's Radical Party announces today that another party member will be assigned to the seat. If Seselj is released before the expiration of his term, he will be able to retake the seat.

Selected Events from: 2002 | 2003
 
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