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Simon And Garfunkel Concerts
Simon And Garfunkel concerts or TV appearances
with spoken introduction to the songs in RealAudio


RAIntroduction to A Most Peculiar Man
in BBC Five-To-Ten, 1965 ( 46s )

Paul Simon : I can recall reading in the paper once a short little piece about a man who had committed suicide, it was about four lines long, and I thought it was a rather bad elogy to someone who is obviously so oppressed with life that he flung it away. So it prompted me to write this song, (I) hope it's a better elogy than the four lines in the paper.

RAIntroduction to Bleecker street
in BBC Five-To-Ten, 1965 ( 58s )

Paul Simon : Bleecker street is a street in New York in Greenwich Village, and it's come to be more than just a street, it's come to be a metaphor for Greenwich Village which is unfortunate because Bleecker street is littered with bad art galleries and pizza stands and it obscures some of the good things, some of the creative things that are happening.
A fog's rolling in off the East river bank
Like a shroud it covers Bleecker street
Fills the alleys where men sleep
Hides the sheperd from the sheep

RAIntroduction to Sparrow
in BBC Five-To-Ten, 1965 ( 31s )

Art Garfunkel : We just have released in Britain an EP of songs written by Paul entitled Wednesday Morning 3AM. This next song is from the EP and is called Sparrow.

RAIntroduction to I am a Rock
in BBC Five-To-Ten, 1965 ( 58s )

Paul Simon : This is unquestionally my most neurotic song. I finished it and I thought, oh man, I can't be this sick. It's called I am a Rock.
A winter's day, in a deep and dark December
I am alone, gazing from my window
To the streets below on a freshly fallen silent shroud of snow.
I am a rock, I am an island.


RAIntroduction to Homeward Bound
in Live in Haarlem, The Netherlands, 1966 ( 19s )

Art Garfunkel : Thanks you very much. I am Arthur Garfunkel, and over here is the writer of all the songs that we do, Paul Simon, and what we've just done is a song called Richard Cory which is an adaptation of an Edwin Arlington Robinson poem. And this one, you might know is called Homeward Bound.

RAIntroduction to I Am a Rock
in Live in Haarlem, The Netherlands, 1966 ( 21s)

Paul Simon : This, according to Artie, is my most neurotic song. I don't know whether that's true or not. It's a song about loneliness, it's called I Am A Rock.

RAIntroduction to A Most Peculiar Man
in Live in Haarlem, The Netherlands, 1966 ( 37s )

Paul Simon : I lived for a long time in London. And when I was there I wrote this next song called A Most Peculiar Man. I wrote it after I read an article in a newspaper about a man who had committed suicide. And thinking that it was a rather bad eulogy to go out with, three lines in a newspaper, I felt that I should write something; This is called A Most Peculiar Man.

RAIntroduction to A Poem On The Underground Wall
in Live in Haarlem, The Netherlands, 1966 ( 14s )

Art Garfunkel : This is one of the most recent of the songs. It's written only two months ago called A Poem On The Underground Wall

RAIntroduction to The Sound Of Silence
in Live in Haarlem, The Netherlands, 1966 ( 29s )

Art Garfunkel : This is a song about the inability of people to communicate with each other, and not particularly internationally, but especially emotionally. So what you see around you is people unable to love each other. This is called The Sounds Of Silence.

RAIntroduction to Sparrow
in Live at the Tufts University, 1966 ( 2 min 50s )

Paul Simon : Amongst my many neuroses, there was a time when I couldn't bear the thought of digging yourself, I thought that was the worst thing. To dig yourself, to think that you were good because if you did dig yourself you never did anything naturally and you're always worried about 'Was I cool, wasn't I cool?' You know what I mean type scenes. A tendency to look into imaginary mirrors to see how you're coming out of every situation. So, during the depths of this neurosis, I'm like shaving with my eyes closed, you know. See myself. One day I walked down Broadway in New York and where Broadway crosses 52nd street there's a drugstore that has a black, plate glass window. Very clearly you can see your reflection in it, if you are of the nature to seek out your reflection in drug store windows. So, anyway I look and Pow! there I am, so I was shocked, I hadn't seen myself in about a year. So I was you know, truth be told, I was digging myself for about 45 seconds, an intense dig. When this bird that was perched overhead, like total disregard for me, just, he defecated on me. I don't know if this has ever happened to you but if it has, you know that it is virtually impossible to maintain your cool under those circumstances. Right? And all I can think of, you know how thoughts raise through your mind in moments of crisis, all I can think of is "there goes a happy bird". And then I'm fantasizing, saying : 'can you imagine this bird, sort of floating above the city of New York for a week , looking for a place to land, like saving up. Don't dig yourself. Relative to nothing, this is a song called 'Sparrow'.

RAIntroduction to A Most Peculiar Man
in Live at the Tufts University, 1966 ( 38 s )

Paul Simon: This is a song called 'A Most Peculiar Man', this is a song that I wrote when I was living in London, and the seeds of the song were planted one day when I read an article in a paper about a man who had committed suicide, four lines in a paper, a little black box, and I thought that was a very bad eulogy, so, this is called 'A Most Peculiar Man'.

RAIntroduction to Red Rubber Ball
in Live at the Tufts University, 1966 ( 33 s )

Art Garfunkel: Paul's just finished a song this week, it's now the 26th Paul Simon song in the collection, almost all of which we have recorded somewhere in a single or an album. There is one fairly notable exception which we would like to do, it's a song that was recorded first before we could get it down by a group called the "Cyrkle" who used to be good friends of ours, and they sold eight hundred and ninety thousand copies of it, it's called 'Red Rubber Ball'.

RAIntroduction to The Dangling Conversation
in Live at the Tufts University, 1966 ( 26 s )

Art Garfunkel: I'd like to do the 'Dangling Conversation' for you. This is a song that is about our favorite amongst all the songs .It took us the longest time to record in the studio, and it took Paul the longest time of all the songs to write it's 'The Dangling Conversation'.

RAIntroduction to The 59th Street Bridge Song ( Feelin' Groovy )
in Live at the Tufts University, 1966 ( 2 min 26 )

I came back from England to the United States in December of 1965. The Sounds of Silence had become a big hit and when I returned I had to make this transition from being relatively unknown in England to a sort of semi-famous over here. I didn't adjust well. It was always slightly embarrassing to me, teeny-bops etc. So I used to think all my sweets are gone ,good times gone, left over in England. All the songs I was writing were very down type of songs, nothing happy. Until about last June, for some reason last June I started to come out of it, I started to get into a good mood, I don't know why. One day I was riding along in my Aston Martin and I said to myself.... no I really don't have an Aston Martin, in fact I don't have a car at all. I was the type of kid when I was in Paris, we'd sit on the side of the Seine, in Paris, and when the tourist boats go by, you know? I would yell out "Capitalist pig!". So here I am getting into this pleasant frame of mind and I was coming home one morning, about six o'clock in the morning and coming over the 59th Street bridge in New York and what a groovy day it was, a really good one, and one of those times when you know you're not really going to be tired for about an hour. So I started writing a song which later became the 59th Street Bridge song or Feelin' Groovy.' It really reminds me of such a groovy time.

RAIntroduction to Richard Cory
in Live at the Tufts University, 1966 ( 14 s )

Art Garfunkel: This is a song which is an adaptation of an Edwin Arlington Robinson poem written some years back called "Richard Cory".

RAIntroduction to Benedictus
in Live at the Tufts University, 1966 ( 42 s )

Art Garfunkel: I'm in the university now, for about 7 years, in a graduate school in Albert when I was undergraduate, I took quite a few music lessons, one of which got me very involved in 16th century music, and I researched one week in the library a two-part setting of a Benedictus from a church mess originally done by Orlando De Lasso, and brought it for the two of us to do it. We rewrote the two parts and added guitar chords to it, and put it into our first album for Columbia. This is our version of Benedictus.

RAIntroduction to Blessed
in Live at the Tufts University, 1966 ( 1 min 17 s )

Paul Simon : There is an area of London called Soho. Soho is roughly equivalent to Greenwich Village in New York. It has a lot of coffee houses, folk clubs, beat clubs and I worked there often and I used to go and see friends who were working there, so I was in and out of Soho very very often. One day I got caught in a downpour and I stepped inside St Anne's Cathedral, which is on a little park in Soho, St Anne's Cathedral. I was impressed with the sermon that I heard being delivered. What impressed me was that it didn't say anything, nothing. When you walked out of there, it didn't make any difference whether you walked in, unless you dug stained glass windows you know. Because the meek are inheriting nothing, nothing and that's the basis of this song called 'Blessed'.

RAIntroduction to A Poem On The Underground Wall
in Live at the Tufts University, 1966 ( 2 min 24 s )

We have an album, the first one we made for Columbia, it's called Wednesday Morning 3AM, and it features on the cover Paul and myself, standing in the Shadows of Love, standing in the subway in New York City, next to an iron post. If you're familiar with the cover, you know that we both wear business suits, standing as the train is about to come in. It happens that the day that we took the pictures, we took about 400 shots, not of that post but of the two of us both leaning against the subway wall which is wide off camera range as you see on the final shot, and we took all these poses and we spent the entire afternoon leaning against this wall until we were pleased with the shot that we thought we were gonna use, and packed up our and cameras and guitars and began to head out of the subway, when I took a brief parting glance at the subway wall in front of which we had taken all the pictures for the first time that day, and noticed that written rather eligibly in the baroque style of New York City subway wall writers was the old familiar suggestion. It was a beautiful illustration that went with it so, we had 400 choices for an album cover and all not acceptable. That was the beginning of the theme which has crept into several of the songs, that people who write on the subway walls - it's made an appearance in the Sounds of Silence - and it's become the theme of a song that went into our last album. The idea is that the people who do these things are in some sense writing a poem, and the sense is that what they're doing is expressing something that is very sincerely felt at the time, would it be anger or whatever, but the point is that there is a reason why people do or do not do that sort of thing, that song is called 'A Poem on the Underground Wall'.

RAIntroduction to 59th Street Bridge Song
in Monterey Pop Festival 1967 ( 1 min 32 s )

Paul Simon : I spent most of the year 1965 living in England, and at the end of that year in December, I came back to the United States, the Sounds of Silence had become a big hit, and I came back. And I had to make this adjustment from being relatively unknown in England to being semi-famous type scenes here and I didn't really swing with it. It was a very difficult scene to make, and very unhappy all the songs I was writing, very depressed-type songs until around June of last year, I started to swing out of it, I was getting into a of a good mood, and I remember coming home in the morning about 6 o'clock over the 59th Street Bridge in New York, and it was such a groovy day really, a good one, and it was one of those times when you know you won't be tired for about an hour, a sort of a good hanging time, so I started to write a song that later became the 59th Street Bridge Song or Feelin' Groovy.

RAIntroduction to For Emily Whenever I May Find Her
in Monterey Pop Festival 1967 ( 50 s )

Art Garfunkel : This is my favorite song, a song written about a year ago, and included in our last album, a song for a girl that neither of us have met, but continue to look for whose name is Emily.

RAIntroduction to Benedictus
in Monterey Pop Festival 1967 ( 44 s )

Paul Simon : Here is a Benedictus that was written by Orlando de Lasso in the 16th century, a blessing for you ... this is a Benedictus.

RAIntroduction to Punky's Dilemma
in Monterey Pop Festival 1967 ( 26 s )

Paul Simon : Ok, 2 minutes ? This is a song that takes 1 min and 53 seconds. Here's a song that you don't know really, it's called 'Punky's Dilemma'. You know it !? A song of social insignificance.

RAIntroduction to April Come She Will
in Live at the Hollywood Bowl 1968 ( 59s )

Paul Simon : When I was living in England, about three years ago, four years ago, I worked in a club in a town called Swindon. It's about 100 miles north of London. I spent the night with a friend of mine in a smaller village called Great Coxswell, not that it means anything, no pun intended. We'd stayed up all night and talked and I said to her 'Let's go out in the morning and do it' 'You too huh?'. We went out at dawn and she recited an English nursery rhyme, it was a children's rhyme and it was about a cuckoo, a bird. And it went :
"April come she will,
May she will stay,
June she'll change her tune,
July she will fly,
August die she must"
.

RAIntroduction to Overs
in Live at the Hollywood Bowl 1968 ( 23s )

Art Garfunkel : This is a song about the end of a relationship between two people, the point in the relationship when both parties realize that the thing they had is over, and yet at the same time each has the realization that they have no place to go. It's called Overs.

RAIntroduction to America
in Live at the Hollywood Bowl 1968 ( 45s )

Paul Simon : When we finished Bookends, we did that year in Los Angeles, and we'd fallen into a pattern towards the end of the album. It was a sort of rhythm method of finishing the album and what would happen : we would sort of wake up in the afternoon and head down to the recording studio and get there about three or four o'clock and stay till about three or four o'clock in the morning and get back in the car and head towards the hotel get stopped by the cops, searched and go to sleep, get up, head down to the studio, get stopped by the cops, searched, etc ... So I tell you that as a prelude to this next song just called America.

RAIntroduction to A Most Peculiar Man
in Live at the Hollywood Bowl 1968 ( 9s )

Paul Simon : A fairly early song, it's a song about a suicide called A Most Peculiar Man.

RAIntroduction to Scarborough Fair
in Live at the Hollywood Bowl 1968 ( 25s )

Art Garfunkel : This is a song that comes from the period of time about four years ago, when we were doing just about all our singing in England in Folk clubs throughout the countryside. This is a song that we learned from a friend of ours, an old English Folk ballad called Scarborough Fair.

RAIntroduction to Benedictus
in Live at the Hollywood Bowl 1968 ( 35s )

Art Garfunkel : We have our friend Al Kooper in the sound controls for us tonight. We've given him special instructions for our next song. This is a four-hundred-year-old piece of church music which is a favorite of ours. This is a two-part setting of a Benedictus that comes from the church mass which we sing in Latin originally set by an Italian named Orlando De Lasso but redone by us, so this is our version.



RAIntroduction to Overs
in Smothers Bros TV Show 1968 ( 32s )

Paul Simon : This is a new song. I finished it about a week ago. It's called "Overs". It's about two people in a relationship that's over, but every time they're about to leave, they realize that there's really no place else to go : Overs.
Why don't we stop fooling ourselves
The game is over, over, over

RAIntroduction to Fakin' it
in Back to College, Miami University 1969 ( 1 min 34 s )

Art Garfunkel : We've made some additions in our show, there are several new firsts for us : it's the first time we ever brought coffee up on the stage with us. I've seen other people do it, you know, the pitcher of water - Joan Baez kind of thing. It is the first time we ever work with a band actually. This is about our fifth show, but just as we've been not doing any performances for about a year, and now that we've come back to do some, we've decided to bring a band on the stage with us for the fun of it, and I'd like to introduce the members of the band to you while they're tuning up, our bass player is from Shreveport, Louisiana : Joe Osborn, the drummer is from Hollywood : Hal Blaine, these are the guys who've been recording with us for the last few years, the keyboard player is also from California : Larry Knechtel, the guitar picker is from Nashville : Fred Carter Jr, the writer of the songs is the sensitive poet Paul Simon.

RAIntroduction to So Long Frank Lloyd Wright
in Back to College, Miami University 1969 ( 50 s )

Art Garfunkel : I said to Paul this summer, while we were living in California, "Why don't you write a song about Frank Lloyd Wright ?", simply because I was, once in my past, I was studying to be an architect, and I was always very fond of Frank Lloyd Wright, and to my surprise, he wrote the following song ...

Paul Simon : to your surprise ?


RAIntroduction to Bridge over Troubled Water
in Back to College, Miami University 1969 ( 36 s )

Art Garfunkel : Here's another new song, probably my favorite, called Bridge over Troubled Water. When you're weary, feeling small ...

RAIntroduction to At the Zoo
in Back to College, Miami University 1969 ( 2 min 21 s )

Paul Simon : How are we doing for sound ? Can you hear me good in there. Groovy, very good. Oh, the ladder ?

Art Garfunkel : you can't do that Peter.

Paul Simon : You can't climb upon the ladder, and shoot just because you feel like climbing on a ladder. No, I'll tell you what that's for, they're shooting film on us because we're doing an hour television show on November 30th, and we're gonna use some of this film perhaps, on that show. We'll also be filming you, so if you have anything that you wanna say to the American public ... we have a platform and we're very open to any ideas, regarding the subject of .. well, sex and drugs, yes, in that category. Just a sneaker, that's all he was.
We haven't been around in about a year, perhaps you've missed us ? Perhaps not, I don't know ? During that period, Arthur became a movie star, he will shortly appear in Mike Nichols' follow-up picture to the Graduate - Catch-22.

I wasn't in that picture. Just nobody much cares about the little songwriter of group anymore, I'm just left to write my songs about sex and drugs, whatever ...


RAIntroduction to Song for the Asking
in Back to College, Miami University 1969 ( 24 s )

Art Garfunkel : Well we've just about finished our next album, we're about 98% finished. This is a song from it that's the most recent of Paul's songs called a 'Song for the Asking'

RAIntroduction to Silver Haired Daddy
in Live in Amsterdam, 1970 ( 43 s)

Paul Simon : This is a, this is an old country and western song that we enjoy singing. It's called 'Silver-Haired Daddy Of Mine'.
In a vine-covered shack in the mountains
Bravely fighting the battle of time
Is a dear one who's weathered my sorrows
T'is that silver-haired Daddy of mine..

RAIntroduction to So Long Frank Lloyd Wright
in Live in Amsterdam, 1970 ( 29 s)

Art Garfunkel : In New York City where we both come from I was going to Columbia University a few years ago studying to be an architect and I had an interest and a liking of the architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright so I suggested to Paul that he write a song about Frank Lloyd Wright, and ...

Paul Simon : I didn't know anything about Frank Lloyd Wright however. I procedeed to write the song anyway.


RAIntroduction to Scarborough Fair
in Live in Amsterdam, 1970 ( 35 s )

Art Garfunkel : This is an English folk song that comes end of the soundtrack of the movie that we made called 'The Graduate' the song is Scarborough Fair.
Are you going to Scarborough Fair, Parsley, Sage Rosemary and Thyme

RAIntroduction to Bridge over Troubled Water
in Live in Amsterdam, 1970 ( 38 s )

Art Garfunkel : We brought our piano player and friend from Hollywood out here to play 'Bridge Over Troubled Water' with us.
When you're weary...

RAIntroduction to The Boxer
in Mc Govern Benefit Campain, June 1972 ( 18 s )

Paul Simon : ... he requested 'Voices of Old People' from the Bookends album.
I am just a poor boy though my story's seldom told ...

RAIntroduction to El Condor Pasa
in Live Rhymin' ( 32 s )

Paul Simon : I first met Urubamba when we worked together in Paris in 1965; they introduced me to south American music. The name of their group comes from a river that runs past the last Inca city Machu Picchu in Peru. I'm happy to introduce you to my friends Urubamba.

RAIntroduction to Mother and Child Reunion
in Live Rhymin' ( 16 s )

Paul Simon : I saw the Jessy Dixon group performing at the Newport Jazz festival two summers ago in New York, and I wanted to work with them ever since then, and now I have the chance to do it, so here is the Jessy Dixon group.

RAIntroduction to The Boxer
in Saturday Night Live, NBC TV show, 1975 ( 50 s )

Paul Simon : So Artie. You've come crawling back ?
Art Garfunkel : It's very nice that you would invite me on your show, Paul, thanks a lot.
Paul Simon : Your movie's over now ? [ ... ] A little two-part harmony ?
Art Garfunkel : I'll try it again, see if it works this time ...
Paul Simon : The Boxer ?
Art Garfunkel : Yeah.

RAIntroduction to America
in Concert in Central Park, New York 1981 ( 55 s )

Paul Simon : Well it's great to do a neighborhood concert. I hope everybody can hear us, I hope that that sound is good. I hope we're blasting Central Park west in Fifteenth Avenue pretty much away. I just wanna thank the police department, the fire department, and the Park's commissioner, and Ed Koch, and particularly, you know, people that never get recognized for doing good deeds for the City, a group of people that have donated half of their proceeds that they're making tonight ; the guys who're selling loose joints are giving the City half of their income tonight.

RAIntroduction to Late Great Johnny Ace
in Concert in Central Park, New York 1981 ( 55 s )

Paul Simon : I hope you can hear me, I'd like to sing a new song. I've recorded this song, and I've never performed it before so this is the first time

RAIntroduction to Sounds of Silence
in Concert in Central Park, New York 1981

Paul Simon : well, you know, we wanted to have fireworks tonight, but they wouldn't let us have them, so let's make our own fireworks together...

RAIntroduction to Graceland
in Out of Africa ( MTV Unplugged ), 1992

Paul Simon : ... This guy has been with us through the whole tour. We played in Louisiana. Somebody gave me this in Lafayette, Louisiana. It's a juju doll. We've been ... every time its hand falls off, it's glued back on and after a hundred and fifty seven shows, it's still with us, it stays with us. It'll be retired after tonight, Jean-Pierre, my ju-ju.

RAIntroduction to April Come She Will
in Paramount Shows, 1993

Art Garfunkel : Then, in the summer of the early Sixties, as Paul kept writing new batches of tunes, I joined him in England during the summer break from Columbia College and amongst the new tunes he had written was this one and it's been a big favorite of mine for many years.

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