The New Zealand Flag

 
 

Other Flags

Seven flags other than the New Zealand Flag are shown for official purposes in New Zealand. The most important of these are The Queen's New Zealand Flag, the Governor-General's Flag, the New Zealand Red Ensign, the New Zealand White Ensign, the Royal New Zealand Air Force Ensign, and the New Zealand Civil Air Ensign.

The Queen's Personal Flag For New Zealand

Queen's personal flag
 

Queen's personal flag

 
 
 

The Queen's Personal Flag for New Zealand symbolises the fact that Queen Elizabeth II is The Queen of New Zealand. Adopted in 1962, it is flown only by Her Majesty when in New Zealand.

The Flag is the shield design of the New Zealand Coat of Arms in the form of an oblong or square. Superimposed in the centre is a dark blue roundel bearing a Roman E surmounted by a Royal Crown within a garland of roses all in gold. The Central device is from The Queen's Personal Flag which is frequently used by Her Majesty in relation to Her position as Head of Commonwealth.

The Queen's Personal Flag for New Zealand is flown continuously on a building when The Queen is in residence and by a ship conveying Her Majesty in New Zealand waters. If the Queen attends a State or public function, her personal flag is flown while she is present. It is not, however, hoisted at every venue attended by Her Majesty. If flown with the New Zealand Flag, The Queen's Personal Flag for New Zealand takes the position of honour.

The Queen's Personal Flag for New Zealand is usually flown above the saluting base at troop inspections or other open air gatherings when Her Majesty is present. It is also broken when the Queen sets foot on board one of Her Majesty's New Zealand ships.

The only time The Queen's Personal Flag for New Zealand is flown in her absence is at parades held on and in honour of Her Majesty's Official Birthday.

The Governor-General's Flag

Governors-General flag
 

Governor-General's Flag

 
 
 

The flag of the Governor-General consists of the Royal Crest in gold, red, white and green on a royal blue ground. The design, introduced in 1931, is uniform throughout the Commonwealth. The words New Zealand appear on a gold scroll beneath the crest.

The Governor-General's flag is flown on all occasions when the Governor-General is present, and takes precedence over the New Zealand Flag. It is flown continuously over Government House when the Governor-General is in residence, and on vehicles used by the Governor-General for official occasions.

Please note that it is not possible to accurately represent the colours of the Governor-General's flag on an image of this size. In these cases, the detailing of the flag is shown only in gold.

The New Zealand Red Ensign

The Red Ensign
 

NZ Red Ensign

 
 
 

New Zealand Government ships must fly the New Zealand Flag. Other New Zealand ships, other than Government ships may fly the New Zealand Flag, the New Zealand Red Ensign, or any flag authorised by either the Sovereign or the Governor-General.

The New Zealand Red Ensign is based on the Red Ensign usually flown by merchant ships registered in the United Kingdom. The Union Jack appears in the first quarter, and the Southern Cross, represented by four five-pointed white stars, is featured in the fly.

The New Zealand Red Ensign has sometimes been flown incorrectly, both in New Zealand and overseas, in the belief that it is New Zealand's national flag.

However, the New Zealand Red Ensign may be flown on land in places or on occasions of Maori significance. The Flags, Emblems, and Names Protection Act 1981 allows for the continuation of this traditional practice.

The New Zealand White Ensign

White ensign
 

NZ White Ensign

 
 
 

Ships and commissioned shore establishments of the Royal New Zealand Navy fly the New Zealand White Ensign. This flag has the Union Jack in the first quarter, on a white background. The Southern Cross, represented by four five-pointed red stars, appears in the fly.

In 1968 the New Zealand White Ensign replaced the British White Ensign previously used by New Zealand naval ships. The New Zealand White Ensign is usually flown only during daylight hours, but in the event of war it would be flown continuously.

The Royal New Zealand Air Force Ensign

RNZAF ensign
 

Royal New Zealand Air Force Ensign

 
 
 

The Royal New Zealand Air Force Ensign is hoisted daily at Air Force establishments. It is also flown on Royal New Zealand Air Force aeroplanes carrying Foreign and Commonwealth Heads of State and Heads of Government, the Prime Minister, Cabinet Ministers, Chiefs of Staff, Ambassadors, and other distinguished persons.

The ensign has a light blue ground with the Union Jack in the first quarter and the Air Force roundel on the fly.

The New Zealand Civil Air Ensign

NZ Civil Air Ensign
 

NZ Civil Air Ensign

 
 
 

The New Zealand Civil Air Ensign may be flown on any New Zealand aircraft, licensed aerodrome, or place authorised as an aerodrome.

Airlines owning New Zealand aircraft may fly the ensign upon or in proximity to their principal office or place of business.

The Civil Aviation Authority of New Zealand may also fly the New Zealand Civil Air Ensign on its buildings and aircraft. Individuals wishing to fly the Ensign must first obtain permission in writing from the Director of Civil Aviation (address below).

The New Zealand Civil Air Ensign features a dark blue Latin cross edged with white on a light blue background. A Union Jack appears in the first quarter and four five-pointed red stars in the lower half of the fly.

Any inquiries regarding the New Zealand Civil Air Ensign should be forwarded to:

The Director of Civil Aviation
Civil Aviation Authority of New Zealand
Aviation House
PO Box 31441
LOWER HUTT 6315

The Union Flag (Union Jack)

Union Jack flag
 

Union Flag

 
 
 

The Union Flag, more commonly known as the Union Jack, is the British national flag. It appears in the first quarter of the New Zealand Flag and the other ensigns referred to this section, as a result of the historical ties with the United Kingdom.

Today the Union Jack is of an equal rank when flown with other national flags. It is only appropriate to fly the Union Jack where a direct link still exists with the United Kingdom or in recognition of a distinguished British visitor.

The New Zealand White Ensign, The Royal New Zealand Air Force Ensign and The New Zealand Civil Air Ensign images on this page are courtesy of Flags of the World