The Chronicle of Higher Education
Complete Contents
From the issue dated March 25, 2005

Short Subjects

GROUNDS FOR PEACE

Michigan State and Texas A&M Universities are working with institutions in Rwanda to help farmers produce coffee beans for the gourmet market.

A HEAD FOR HOLLYWOOD: An associate professor of engineering at Auburn University won a technical Academy Award for making movie magic more real.

ELEMENTS OF STYLE: A fashion class at the University of Hertfordshire examines glamour up close at Fashion Week.

BEST SELLERS: What they're reading on college campuses

The Faculty

NO CONFIDENCE AT HARVARD

The faculty vote against Lawrence H. Summers is the first of its kind at the university, but its governing board continues to back the president.

MOONLIGHTING ON MUSIC ROW

The dean of Belmont University's new music-business school runs a Christian recording company on the side.

ARMCHAIR TRAVELERS

Colleges go to great pains to offer students flexibility in their workspaces. So why do many faculty members balk at the same opportunities? Thomas Fisher, dean of the College of Architecture and Landscape Architecture at the University of Minnesota, ponders the question.

USE YOUR FACULTIES

If professors can navigate intricate research projects, surely they can understand and contribute to their campuses' building plans, says Mary Burgan, a former general secretary of the American Association of University Professors.

PART GATEKEEPER, PART HUCKSTER

A graduate-studies director finds that the admissions season demands a Jekyll-and-Hyde approach to applicants.

SYLLABUS: A course at Clemson University explores the nature of genius, brilliance, and inspiration.

PEER REVIEW: Hamilton Jordan, chief of staff under President Jimmy Carter, will become a research fellow at the University of Georgia. ... The president of Western Oregon University is retiring after just two-and-a-half years. ... Philip J. Currie, a leading dinosaur hunter, is leaving the museum he helped found to join the faculty at the University of Alberta. ... The dean of the law school at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will become the president of the College of William and Mary.

Research & Books

CLOAK AND CLASSROOM

A new, semi-secret government program provides scholarships to American social scientists who promise to work for U.S. intelligence agencies.

BIODEFENSE BUILDUP

Scientists are concerned that the National Institutes of Health's increased spending on bioterrorism research is out of scale with the threat.

DOWNHILL STUDIES

A professor at Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis investigates American history from the ski slopes.

TURNING THE PAGE: The first large-scale comparison of open-access journals with traditional ones reveals a publishing industry in flux.

HOT TYPE: A conservative legal scholar takes an unexpected stance on religion and constitutional rights.

NOTA BENE: An archaeologist at the University of Redlands investigates the Hopi oral tradition to learn about the movements of prehistoric social groups.

NEW SCHOLARLY BOOKS

Government & Politics

BIODEFENSE BUILDUP

Scientists are concerned that the National Institutes of Health's increased spending on bioterrorism research is out of scale with the threat.

CLOAK AND CLASSROOM

A new, semi-secret government program provides scholarships to American social scientists who promise to work for U.S. intelligence agencies.

CALL FOR AN OVERHAUL: Elementary and secondary school leaders don't need doctorates, and education schools shouldn't offer them, says an eminent educator.

NO MYSTERY AT MERCYHURST: The small liberal-arts college in former Secretary of Homeland Security Tom Ridge's hometown got a $90,000 no-bid contract to train intelligence analysts for the agency.

REMEDIATION REVIEW: California State University is struggling in its effort to reduce the number of new students who need extra academic preparation.

STAMPING OUT ABUSES: The U.S. Senate has approved legislation that would make it harder for college students to wipe out private educational loans by filing for personal bankruptcy.

INCENTIVE PLAN: A group of U.S. lawmakers have introduced a bill that aims to generate more than $17-billion in scholarship aid over the next decade by enticing colleges to participate in the direct-student-loan program instead of the guaranteed-loan program.

GOING DOWN: The maximum Pell Grant will cover only a quarter of the cost of attending a four-year public institution by 2010, according to a new study.

STATEHOUSE DIGEST: News from the state capitals

IN BRIEF: A roundup of higher-education news

Money & Management

MISSION RESTATED

Like other Roman Catholic women's colleges, Trinity College, in Washington, has flourished since it pinned its survival on serving new types of students.

NO CONFIDENCE AT HARVARD

The faculty vote against Lawrence H. Summers is the first of its kind at the university, but its governing board continues to back the president.

A SOFTWARE REVOLUTIONARY

A Columbia University law professor fights to keep open-source products free -- with help from big business.

CONSTRUCTION BOOM

In reports from Berkeley to the Bronx, The Chronicle looks at new and renovated campus buildings that were completed during 2004 and considers how colleges are dealing with the need for increasingly large buildings.

DIVAS OF DESIGN

Working with a strong architect requires an equally strong client. Most colleges and universities are simply not up to the task, says Arthur J. Lidsky, president of Dober, Lidsky, Craig and Associates, a campus- and facility-planning firm in Belmont, Mass.

PAYING THE PRICE

A chancellor offers a primer on how to handle controversy -- in this case, a speech by Ward Churchill.

DEATH OF A FUND RAISER

When a colleague feels like the fund-raising world's version of Willy Loman, the usual career advice falls flat.

SALARY TABLE: Median salaries of midlevel administrative workers increased by 3 percent in 2004-5, topping last year's increase and outpacing inflation.

GOOD REPUTATION: Colleges and universities, both public and private, can look forward to stable credit ratings this year, says Moody's Investors Service.

SERIOUS ISSUES: An Oregon foundation has cut off grants to students at Oregon State University, citing concerns about academic quality and student misbehavior.

PURCHASING POWER: DeVry Inc., Huron Capital Partners, and Kaplan Inc. have added to their holdings of private colleges.

FINAL WARNING: Sheldon Jackson College's accreditor says the Alaska institution is in "serious noncompliance" with standards as a result of errors in its accounting of financial aid.

PEER REVIEW: Hamilton Jordan, chief of staff under President Jimmy Carter, will become a research fellow at the University of Georgia. ... The president of Western Oregon University is retiring after just two-and-a-half years. ... Philip J. Currie, a leading dinosaur hunter, is leaving the museum he helped found to join the faculty at the University of Alberta. ... The dean of the law school at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will become the president of the College of William and Mary.

Information Technology

A SOFTWARE REVOLUTIONARY

A Columbia University law professor fights to keep open-source products free -- with help from big business.

TAKING ON GOLIATH: A Kent State student who countersued Microsoft over software sales on eBay has reached a settlement with the company.

WORDS WHAT BEEN SAID: A new collection of voice recordings at the British Library compares English dialects from the 1950s with those of the late 1990s.

THE WIRED CAMPUS: A roundup of information-technology news in higher education

TURNING THE PAGE: The first large-scale comparison of open-access journals with traditional ones reveals a publishing industry in flux.

Students

STANDARDIZED REST

After taking the new, nearly four-hour SAT, which for the first time included an essay, many high-school students agreed on at least one good response: a long nap.

DOWN IN HISTORY: A 20-year-old junior at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute is the youngest winner ever of the American Crossword Puzzle Tournament.

ASK YOUR DRUGGIST: Applications to pharmacy schools continue to rise as graduates are allowed to provide more health-management services to customers.

Athletics

YOU PASS, YOU PLAY

Under the NCAA's new academic grading system, coaches will be keeping a nervous eye on the classrooms.

ON PROBATION: The National Collegiate Athletic Association penalized Texas State University at San Marcos after finding that the college had given athletes $74,000 and forced football players to attend practices that should have been voluntary.

FOULED OUT: After weeks of accusations on both sides, California State University at Fresno has fired its women's basketball coach.

International

GROUNDS FOR PEACE

Michigan State and Texas A&M Universities are working with institutions in Rwanda to help farmers produce coffee beans for the gourmet market.

'A MORAL CHALLENGE'

The developed world should make a commitment to provide at least $5-billion over the next decade to universities in Africa, an international panel has recommended.

Notes From Academe

DOWNHILL STUDIES

A professor at Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis investigates American history from the ski slopes.

Special Supplement: Campus Architecture

CONSTRUCTION BOOM

In reports from Berkeley to the Bronx, The Chronicle looks at new and renovated campus buildings that were completed during 2004 and considers how colleges are dealing with the need for increasingly large buildings.

DIVAS OF DESIGN

Working with a strong architect requires an equally strong client. Most colleges and universities are simply not up to the task, says Arthur J. Lidsky, president of Dober, Lidsky, Craig and Associates, a campus- and facility-planning firm in Belmont, Mass.

PLACES IN THE HEART

Once you've been inside them, some campus buildings stay inside you. Fourteen people reflect on their favorites.

A BRILLIANT, INVISIBLE HAND

Charles Z. Klauder's understated, thoughtful designs define some of America's most memorable campuses, writes Frances Halsband, a partner in the New York firm R.M. Kliment & Frances Halsband Architects.

YOU ARE WHERE YOU EAT

Food services have dispersed all over the campus, reflecting the networks of academic life, says Jamie Horwitz, an associate professor of architecture at Iowa State University.

ARMCHAIR TRAVELERS

Colleges go to great pains to offer students flexibility in their workspaces. So why do many faculty members balk at the same opportunities? Thomas Fisher, dean of the College of Architecture and Landscape Architecture at the University of Minnesota, ponders the question.

SITE AND VISION

Landscape architects know better than anyone that no building is an island, writes Michael Van Valkenburgh, a professor of landscape architecture at Harvard University.

PATHS TO ACTIVE LIVING

Walkways should be central to campus planning, writes Phillip B. Sparling, a professor of applied physiology at the Georgia Institute of Technology.

USE YOUR FACULTIES

If professors can navigate intricate research projects, surely they can understand and contribute to their campuses' building plans, says Mary Burgan, a former general secretary of the American Association of University Professors.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

CHRONICLE CAREERS

PAYING THE PRICE

A chancellor offers a primer on how to handle controversy -- in this case, a speech by Ward Churchill.

PART GATEKEEPER, PART HUCKSTER

A graduate-studies director finds that the admissions season demands a Jekyll-and-Hyde approach to applicants.

DEATH OF A FUND RAISER

When a colleague feels like the fund-raising world's version of Willy Loman, the usual career advice falls flat.

DETAILS OF AVAILABLE POSTS, including teaching and research positions in higher education, administrative and executive jobs, and openings outside academe

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