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Floral Emblem
 

Floral Emblem

Plunkett mallee Eucalyptus curtisii

 

What is our Floral Emblem?

Plunkett mallee Eucalyptus curtisii was adopted as the Ipswich City floral emblem in 1996. The Queensland Nature Conservation Act 1992 classifies this small tree as rare. Due to the extractive industries and residential developments of the last century only small populations remain in a few areas of Southeast Queensland. This species long-term survival in the wild has been greatly enhanced due to voluntary acquisition of land under the Ipswich Enviroplan Program. Some of the remaining populations of this rare species are being protected in the White Rock Conservation Park. Other small populations have been recorded at Riverview and Dinmore.

 

Description

Eucalyptus curtisii is a mallee or multi-stemmed tree growing to approximately 6-8m. The pendulous long narrow leaves (130mm x 30mm) are dark green above and pale green below. The bark is deciduous, shedding in long grey ribbons to reveal the cream to orange bark beneath.

 

Flowers

Around November this small tree explodes in clusters of cream to white flowers that are an important food source for bees, small mammals, and a wide range of nectar feeding birds including lorikeets and honeyeaters.

 

Uses

Apart from the significance of being an Australian native plant local to Ipswich, the Plunkett mallee was chosen as Ipswich City Floral Emblem because of its suitability for gardens. It is equally attractive as a specimen tree or as a group planting. Being low growing, frost tolerant, and accepting of a wide range of soil types, it is ideally suited to parklands and residential gardens, streetscapes, and under powerlines. The Plunkett Mallee is also extremelly well suited to dry conditions.

Eucalyptus curtisiiis available from council nurseries through the Ipswich City Council Free Plant Program.

Last Updated 28 Sep 2006

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