Lieutenant-Colonel George Munro
THE 35th FOOT PROJECT WOULD LIKE TO THANK MR BILL STEVENS, HISTORIAN OF ST PETER'S CHURCH, ALBANY, NY, FOR SUPPLYING MUCH OF THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION

 


    Lieutenant-Colonel George Munro of Fort William Henry, was born sometime during 1700 in Clonfin, County Longford, Ireland and was the youngest of three children born to Colonel George Munro and Margaret Bruce. His father had seen active service for the Crown and had served at the battle Dunkeld 1689 and as a Major in Sir Charles Graham's Regiment of Foot at the siege of Namur in 1695.
    Very little is known of the young George Munro's early life but his life in OTWAY'S Regiment (35th Regiment of Foot) can be charted by his promotions----

                                    Lieutenant-------9th August1718
                                    Captain------27th September 1727
                                    Major-----------         August 1747
                                    Lieutenant Colonel--4th January1750

    In 1756 the 35th Regiment of Foot and its Colonel were on their way to America. By way of Albany and Fort Edward they were soon at Fort William Henry. By Spring 1757 Fort william Henry was under siege.

    Whatever the truth is regarding Webb's failure to support the besieged forces at FORT WILLIAM HENRY, the garrison commander emerged from the disaster with something of an enhanced reputation. Despite the action being the first engagement for both the Regiment and its Colonel, Lieutenant George Munro's handling of the forces under his control and the final decision to capitulate not only shows a man seeking relief for not only his men, but also the non-combatants at that time in the Fort, by taking the only honourable way left open to him. His stubborn resistance and final decision to surrender had at the same time earnt him, at the very least, the true esteem of no less a person than the great Marquis De Montcalm.

    For his actions George Munro was hailed as something of a hero and gazetted full Colonel in January 1758. However for the short period of life left to him, the man George Munro, felt the full weight of responsibility for the massacre, his health failed him, and on 3rd of November 1758 at the age of 57 Colonel Munro died of a heart attack while on the streets of Albany.

    Colonel George Munroe had been married and at his death left two sons and a daughter about whom little is known. He was interred the day after his passing at St.Peters Episcopal Church, Albany, New York.

    True to his feelings of guilt Colonel George Munro wanted no marker to show where he lay, the position remaining a mystery until research in the 1980's by a member of the Munro clan. He lies next to another hero of the French and Indian War--Lord Howe (of Ticonderoga) in the Vestibule of St Peter's.


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