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West Virginia Wildlife Management Areas

( Wildlife Management Areas are listed according to their reference on the WMA Map )

District 1

Bear Rock Lakes WMA (242 acres) Ohio County. Located off U.S. Route 40 near Valley Grove, 13 miles east of Wheeling and two miles from the Dallas Pike Interchange of I-70. Visitors may take West Alexander Road to Stoolfire Road to Park Hill Road to Bear Rock Lakes WMA. Mixed hardwoods and open fields cover most of the area. HUNTING IS LIMITED DUE TO THE SIZE OF THE AREA. Deer, rabbit, squirrel and turkey are the principal game species. Four lakes are located on the area: Bear Lake, 8 acres; Rock Lake, 4 acres; Baker Lake, 3.4 acres; and Wood Pond, 0.5 acres, which has physically challenged access. A boat launch ramp is located on Bear Lake. A level path surrounding one-half of Bear and Rock lakes makes fishing for warmwater species and trout particularly appealing to children, the elderly and the physically challenged. Overnight camping and open fires are not permitted. Toilet facilities are available. Owned and managed by the WVDNR.

Briery Mountain WMA (1,057 acres) Preston County. Access is by Whetzell Settlement Road which intersects state Route 7 approximately 1.5 miles east of Kingwood. Terrain is moderate to steep, ranging in elevation from 1,880 to 2,880 feet. The area is almost entirely forested with mixed hardwood species. Turkey, deer, squirrel and grouse are the principal species available. No camping is permitted on the area. A FREE ANNUAL HUNTING PERMIT IS REQUIRED BY THE WV STATE ARMORY BOARD. FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION CONTACT THE NATURAL RESOURCES OFFICE AT CAMP DAWSON (304-329-4417) OR THE DNR DISTRICT 1 OFFICE IN FAIRMONT (304-367-2720). Owned by the West Virginia State Armory Board and managed in cooperation with the WVDNR.

Burches Run Lake WMA (55 acres) Marshall County. Access is by county Route 14, which intersects state Route 88 approximately six miles south of Wheeling. County Routes 5 and 16 also provide access to the area. Terrain is generally rolling hillsides ranging in elevation from 780 to 900 feet and a mature oak-hickory forest covers most of the area. HUNTING IS LIMITED DUE TO THE SIZE OF THE AREA. Deer, grouse, squirrel and raccoon are the principal game species available. A 16-acre impoundment provides excellent fishing for trout, largemouth bass, sunfish and channel catfish. Muskellunge and northern pike have been stocked. Toilet facilities are available. Overnight camping and open fires are not permitted. Owned and managed by the WVDNR.

Castlemans Run Lake WMA (486 acres) Brooke and Ohio counties. Located off U.S. Route 40 near Potomac Settlement in Brooke County, the area is approximately three miles south of Bethany along county Route 32. It is comprised of mixed hardwoods, brushland and open fields. Good hunting opportunities exist for deer, turkey, grouse, raccoon and squirrel. Castlemans Run Lake, 22 acres, provides fishing for bluegill, catfish, muskellunge, northern pike and trout. A boat launch ramp is located on the area. Overnight camping and open fires are not permitted. Toilet facilities are available. Owned and managed by the WVDNR.

Cecil H. Underwood WMA (2,072 acres) Marshall and Wetzel counties. Located 10 miles south of Cameron along U.S. Route 250. Access is by way of county Routes 89 and 250/13 (Rice Ridge Road). The rugged terrain ranges in elevation from 800 feet along the West Virginia Fork of Fish Creek to 1,510 feet. Oak-hickory and cove hardwoods dominate the forest canopy, and are interspersed with numerous access trails and forest clearings. Deer, turkey, squirrel and ruffed grouse are the primary game species. Limited fishing opportunities can be found in the WV Fork of Fish Creek. No camping is permitted on the area. Owned and managed by the WVDNR.

Center Branch WMA (974 acres) Harrison County. Located along state Route 20 at Stonewood and county Route 25, north of Mt. Clare. Access can also be gained by way of county Route 20/10 (Turkey Run Road). Topography varies from strip-bench flats to steep slopes and scattered high walls rising in elevation to 1,520 feet. Vegetation consists primarily of oak-hickory and cove hardwood forests in pole timber to early saw timber stages. Forest game species such as deer, turkey, grouse and squirrel are abundant on the area. Overnight camping and open fires are not permitted. Owned and managed by the WVDNR.

Cross Creek WMA (2,081 acres) Brooke County. Located approximately 6 miles northeast of Wellsburg along county Route 7 at Virginville. Additional access can be gained from county Routes 7/3, 7/4 and 27/5. Terrain is gently rolling (reclaimed surface mine areas) to moderately steep slopes, with scattered high walls rising in elevation to 1,250 feet. The area primarily consists of mixed hardwoods, reclaimed strip mined areas, beaver ponds and strip benches. Deer, turkey, ruffed grouse and waterfowl are the primary game species. No camping is permitted on the area. Owned by the WVDNR and Starvaggi Industries. Managed by the WVDNR.

Dunkard WMA (470 acres) Marshall County. The area is located in northeastern Marshall County along the Pennsylvania state line, and it can be accessed by West Virginia County Route 15. The wildlife management area is primarily forested with a 49-acre lake serving as the primary attraction for the area. Dunkard Fork Lake, which is located primarily in West Virginia with a small upstream portion in Pennsylvania, provides excellent warmwater fishing opportunities for channel catfish, bluegill and black bass (catch and release). The lake is also stocked with trout from January through May of each year. Consult your West Virginia Regulations for special fishing regulations. The lake has a boat ramp and fishing pier constructed along the primary access road. In addition, the area provides limited hunting opportunities for wild turkey, waterfowl, white-tailed deer, ruffed grouse and other forest game species. Owned by the WVDNR.

Hillcrest WMA (2,212 acres) Hancock County. Located off state Route 8 along county Route 42 (Middle Run Road). Topography ranges from flat bottomlands to rolling uplands with elevations ranging from 1,000 to 1,280 feet. The area primarily consists of old fields, orchards, croplands and scattered woodlots. The abundant farm game habitat provides excellent hunting for ring-necked pheasant, rabbit, turkey, mourning dove and deer. Squirrel and grouse populations are limited due to the small percentage of forested cover. Camping and open fires are not permitted. Tomlinson Run State Park, located 1.5 miles southwest of the area, offers camping facilities for a nominal fee. A 100-yard shooting range, which is accessible to the physically challenged, is located on the area. Owned and managed by the WVDNR.

Lantz Farm and Nature Preserve (540 acres) Wetzel County. Located along U.S. Route 20 at Jacksonburg. Additional access is by way of county Route 82 (Buffalo Run Road). Terrain is gently rolling to moderately steep and ranges in elevation from 736 feet to 1,475 feet. The area is dominated by old growth oak-hickory and cove hardwood forests and large open fields. A portion of the area is safety zoned from hunting due to recreational facilities (i.e., interpretive nature trail, fishing pond). Deer, squirrel and turkey are the primary game species. Trout are stocked in the South Fork of Fishing Creek which runs through the area. No camping facilities are present on the area. Owned by Wheeling Jesuit University and cooperatively managed by the WVDNR.

Lewis Wetzel WMA (13,388 acres) Wetzel County. Located 3/4 mile south of Jacksonburg on Buffalo Run Road. Another access is via Indian Creek Road (county Route 13), approximately 14 miles east of its intersection with state Route 18. The rugged terrain ranging in elevation from 736 to 1,560 feet has an abundance of oak, hickory and beech trees. Deer, turkey, squirrel, raccoon and ruffed grouse are the primary game species. Trout are stocked in the North and South Forks of Fishing Creek and a good smallmouth bass population is available from Pine Grove to Smithfield. A campground with twenty tent and trailer sites includes charcoal grills, picnic tables and pit toilets. Nominal fees are charged for camping and firewood. A 100-yard shooting range, which is accessible to the physically challenged, is located on the area. Owned and managed by the WVDNR.

Pleasant Creek WMA (3,030 acres) Barbour and Taylor counties. Located along U.S. Routes 119 and 250, six miles north of Philippi and nine miles south of Grafton. Habitats vary from wetland to mixed hardwood forest and slopes are moderately steep, rising to 1,600 feet. Deer, turkey, waterfowl, grouse, squirrel and rabbit are the primary game species. Tygart Lake offers anglers a wide variety of warmwater fish species, with walleye, smallmouth bass, crappie and channel catfish providing excellent fishing opportunities. Pleasant Creek and Doe Run Impoundment provide good bank fishing opportunities. A campground with forty tent and trailer sites includes fireplaces, picnic tables, well water and pit toilets. Nominal fees are charged for camping and firewood. A 200-yard rifle range, which is accessible to the physically challenged, is located on the area. Owned by the WVDNR and U. S. Army Corps of Engineers. Managed by the WVDNR. For additional information contact: Resource Manager, Tygart Lake, Route 1, Box 257, Grafton, West Virginia 26354, (304) 265-1760. Lake and recreation information (304) 265-5953.

Pruntytown State Farm WMA (1,764 acres) Taylor County. Located 0.5 mile west of Pruntytown off U.S. Route 50 and county Routes 38, 16 and 10. Vegetation consists of early succession oak-hickory forests and farm game habitat. Deer, turkey, ruffed grouse, rabbit and mourning dove are the principal game species. A safety zone is maintained around the farm buildings. Owned by the West Virginia Department of Agriculture and cooperatively managed with the WVDNR.

Snake Hill WMA (2,000 acres) Monongalia County. Located three miles north of Dellslow and accessed by county Routes 75 and 75/2 (Snake Hill Road), this area is directly across the Cheat River from the Coopers Rock State Forest overlook. Vegetation consists primarily of oak-hickory and cove hardwoods with scattered clearings and gas well locations. Terrain ranges from gently rolling to very steep slopes in the Cheat River canyon with elevations ranging from 900 feet to 2,200 feet. Principal game species are deer, turkey, squirrel, raccoon and ruffed grouse. Camping is not permitted on the area. Owned and managed by the WVDNR.

Teter Creek Lake WMA (137 acres) Barbour County. Located nine miles north of Belington. Access is by way of county Route 9 from state Route 92 at Meadowville. Teter Creek lies in the Allegheny Plateau and has an average elevation of 1,800 feet. Vegetation consists of oak-hickory forests on gentle slopes, abandoned farmlands and mixed conifer plantations. Squirrel, turkey, waterfowl, ruffed grouse, raccoon and deer are the principal game species. HUNTING IS LIMITED DUE TO THE SIZE OF THE AREA. Teter Creek Lake, 35 acres, provides fishing for trout and warmwater species such as largemouth bass, rock bass, bluegill and channel catfish. A boat launch ramp and physically challenged fisherman trail are located on the area. A campground with twenty tent and trailer sites includes charcoal grills, well water, picnic tables and pit toilets. Nominal fees are charged for camping and firewood. Owned and managed by the WVDNR.

Upper Deckers Creek WMA (56 acres) Preston County. Located one mile north of Reedsville via state Route 92 and county Route 27/3. The area consists of two man-made wetlands comprising 16 acres. Hunting Opportunities Are Extremely Limited Due To The Size Of The Area And Adjacent Houses. Camping and open fires are not permitted on the area. Owned and managed by the WVDNR.



District 2

 

Allegheny WMA (5,690 acres) Mineral County. This area is comprised of two tracts of land (4,522 and 1,168 acres) located on the western edge of the county. Forest cover for the area is predominantly oak-hickory. The larger tract which lays along the top of the Allegheny Front is located approximately four miles southwest of Keyser and ac cessible from secondary route 4 (Pinnacle Road) and route 220/2 (Pine Swamp Road). This tract consists of a relatively flat, rocky mountaintop with laurel thickets and a steep side slope leading to foothills and associated hollows. The smaller tract is located along five miles of the North Branch of the Potomac River approximately six miles north of Elk Garden and is accessible from state Route 46 and secondary Route 46/3 (Barnum Road). The area consists of a ridgetop with steep hillsides. Wide areas along the stream and on the ridge presently contain old field habitat. White-tailed deer, black bear, turkey, squirrel and ruffed grouse are some of the game species found throughout the area. Bobcat, raccoon, red fox and gray fox are furbearers also found there. A cold water release from Jennings Randolph Lake allows the North Branch to offer year-round trout fishing opportunities. Camping is not permitted on the area. Owned by WVDNR.

Edwards Run WMA (397 acres) Hampshire County. Located two miles north of Capon Bridge on state secondary Route 15 and reached by turning north on state Route 15 from U.S. Route 50 at Capon Bridge. The area primarily consists of low hills with steep slopes covered in an oak-hickory forest plus approximately 17 acres of scattered clearings and brushy areas. White-tailed deer, turkey, squirrel and grouse hunting opportunities are available on the area. A section of Edwards Run and a 2-acre lake provides angling for trout. A small primitive camping area is near the lake and pit toilets and trash receptacles are provided. A nominal camping fee is charged. Owned by WVDNR.

Fort Mill Ridge WMA (217 acres) Hampshire County. Located two miles southwest of Romney off U.S. Route 50, the area can be reached by going south from U.S. Route 50 on the Phoenix Orchard road 50 yards to the access road on the left. The area is located primarily on one ridge that ranges in elevation from 680 to 1,100 feet. Forest consists mainly of hardwood with some pine. Primary game species are deer and squirrel. Fishing for warmwater specis available in the South Branch River on the east side of the area. Camping is not permitted. Owned by WVDNR.

Nathaniel Mountain WMA (8,875 acres) Hampshire County. The principal access is via U.S. Route 50 just east of Romney, then south on county Route 10 (Grassy Lick Road) to the entrance road. Nathaniel, Piney and Big mountains dominate the area, ranging from 1,000 to 3,050 feet, and the forests are primarily mixed oak-hickory and Virginia pine. White-tailed deer, turkey and squirrel are abundant and black bear also inhabit the area. A nominal camping fee is charged. Owned by WVDNR.

Shannondale Springs WMA (1,361 acres) Jefferson County. The area can be reached by traveling about four miles east of Charles Town on state Route 9 and then turning onto Mission Road. Mature hardwood forest, brush land and open fields cover the rolling hills which range in elevation from 350 to 700 feet. Hunting is excellent for white tailed deer, squirrel and raccoon. Turkey, mourning dove, bobwhite quail, woodcock and waterfowl also provide hunting opportunities. Furbearers on the area include red and gray fox, opossum, skunk, mink, muskrat and beaver. The Shenandoah River provides excellent fishing for smallmouth bass, channel catfish, rock bass and panfish. Camping and open fires are prohibited. Owned by WVDNR.

Short Mountain WMA (8,005 acres) Hampshire County. Traveling from U.S. Route 50, turn south at Augusta onto county Route 7 (Augusta-Rio Road), drive approximately eight miles and turn left at the Short Mountain WMA sign. Two mountain ridges form a long horseshoe-shaped basin, nearly all of which is covered in mixed oak and Virginia pine. Hunting for turkey, deer, squirrel and ruffed grouse can be rewarding. One-half mile of North River crosses the area and is stocked with trout. Six primitive camp grounds are distributed around the area. A nominal camping fee is charged. Owned by WVDNR.

Sleepy Creek WMA (22,928 acres) Berkeley and Morgan counties. Located approximately six miles southeast of Berkeley Springs and eleven miles west of Martinsburg, travelers may use state Routes 8/2 (Highland Ridge) and 13/5 (Greenwood Road) in Morgan County or state Route 7/9 (Jones Springs and Shanghai) in Berkeley County. Oak-hickory forest covers 3,500 acres while Virginia pine-oak forest blankets the majority of the area. Sleepy Creek is primarily managed for deer, turkey, grouse, squirrel and raccoon, with wild turkey the featured game species. Sleepy Creek Lake, 205 acres, contains a good sport fishery for largemouth bass, bluegill and crappie. Boat launching facilities are situated at the dam spillway and near the midpoint of the lake. The area also has a rifle range. Seventy-five camping sites are available and trailers over 17 feet are not recommended due to the graveled roads. Water and vault toilets are available and a nominal camping fee is charged. Owned by WVDNR.

South Branch WMA (1097 acres) Hardy and Hampshire Counties. The McNeill tract is approximately 7 miles north of Moorefield and approximately 65 miles west of Winchester, VA. The area can be reached by taking U.S. Route 220 north from Moorefield 1.7 miles and then east on state Route 15 (Cunningham Lane) 1 mile to state Route 6 (Trough Road). Follow this route north 4 miles to the entrance road on the left (west) side of the road. The area is located along the South Branch River and contains approximately 1,097 acres in four separate tracts (MCNeill, Bridge, Trough Club and Sector). The McNeill tract contains about 430 acres of pasture and forest land that is accessible from state Route 6. The Bridge tract is a narrow, steep section of mountainside along the west side of the railroad right-of-way north of the Sycamore bridge and contains about 25 acres. The Trough Club tract contains about 602 acres of steep, forested mountainside on both sides of the river in the area known as “The Trough” and is accessible to the public only from the river. The Sector tract (Hampshire County) contains about 35 acres of river bottomland field and is accessible from Route 8/3. Elevations range from 720 to 1700 feet. The McNeill tract contains about 200 acres of open fields of which about 170 acres is leased for cattle grazing as part of the area maintenance. The remaining 230 acres contains about 200 acres of mixed oak-hickory timber and about 30 acres of old fields that are being invaded by red cedar. The area presents opportunities for dove, squirrel, deer and turkey hunting. A boating access site to the South Branch with a ramp and parking area is located on this tract and about 1.6 miles of the river is accessible for fishing from the bank. Camping is not permitted.

Thorn Creek WMA (528 acres) Pendleton County. Located approximately 7 miles south of Franklin. The area may be reached by taking U.S. Route 220 south from Franklin 2.7 miles and then turning east on state Route 20 (Thorn Creek Road) for 3.7 miles to the area. The area is mostly mixed hardwood forest with some pine and hemlock. It is located along Thorn Creek and encompasses a portion of Neds Mountain on the east and Pond Mountain on the west. Primary game species are deer, squirrel and turkey. Elevation ranges from 1,950 to 2,900 feet. A section of trout stream about 1/2-mile long is available for Fly Fishing Only. Camping is not permitted. Owned by WVDNR.

Widmeyer WMA (422 acres) Morgan County. The area is accessible from state Route 9/11 off state Route 9 about three miles north of Great Cacapon. The area borders about two miles of the CSX railroad track along the Potomac River and extends up the west side of Cacapon Mountain. The forest cover type is upland oak-pine mixture. Widmeyer is managed primarily to benefit wild turkey and squirrel. The deer and grouse populations however, are growing. Fishing opportunities do not exist on the area and camping is not permitted. Owned by WVDNR.



District 3

Becky Creek WMA (1,930 acres) Randolph County. Located approximately nine miles south of Huttonsville, access is via county Route 43 (Becky Creek Road) from state Route 219. Several stream crossings can limit access during high water. Deer, turkey and bear are abundant in this mountainous terrain covered mostly by hardwood forest. Trappers and hunters alike can expect to find raccoon, fox and bobcat. Primitive camping is available in designated areas. Owned by West Virginia Department of Agriculture. Leased and managed by WVDNR.

Big Ditch WMA (388 acres) WebsterCounty. Located one-half mile from Cowen on county Route 30, 15 miles southwest of Webster Springs. Big Ditch is located in a valley with moderate side slopes offering small game, waterfowl and bowhunting. HUNTING IS LIMITED DUE TO THE SIZE OF THE AREA. Warmwater fishing is featured on 55-acre Big Ditch Lake. Boats may use electric motors only. Primary sport fishing effort is for largemouth bass, bluegill, crappie and channel catfish. Fishing accommodations provided for the physically disabled. Owned and managed by WVDNR.

Burnsville Lake WMA (12,579 acres) Braxton County. Located three miles east of Burnsville off exit 79 of I-79, or 11 miles north on U.S. Route 19 from exit 67 of I-79. Hilly and steep terrain prevails, with some gently sloping upland areas and fairly flat creek bottoms. There is a mixture of young timber, brush and old fields creating good hunting conditions for deer, turkey, raccoon, rabbit and grouse. Populations of largemouth, smallmouth and spotted bass, crappie, muskellunge, channel catfish and bluegill will give anglers plenty of action in 968-acre Burnsville Lake. Accommodations are provided for the physically disabled angler and Class Q hunter. Boat ramps at Riffle Run and the Bulltown Day Use Area provide year-round access for general public use. Burnsville Lake Marina, (304) 853-2822, is generally open from early April until mid-October. Rental boats, gasoline, snacks and bait are available. Camping is allowed in Corps of Engineers campgrounds only. Managed by WVDNR. Owned by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. For additional information contact: Resource Manager, Burnsville Lake, HC 10, Box 24, Burnsville, WV 26335-0221, (304) 853-2371. Daily lake conditions and events, (304) 853-2398.

Elk River WMA (18,225 acres) Braxton County. Exit 67 of I-79 at the Flatwoods interchange and travel south on state Routes 4 and 19. Go approximately two miles to secondary Route 15 and proceed east following DNR signs to the Holly River section. Access also from state Route 19/40 by turning east onto state Route 17, go 3.7 miles southeast of Sutton and follow DNR signs to the Elk River section. Steep hills, ridges and benches dominate the area, which is bounded by Elk River and Sutton Lake. Mature hardwood forests cover portions of the area, making squirrel and turkey hunting particularly good. Brushlands provide excellent deer hunting. Habitat improvement has greatly increased waterfowl hunting potential. Two shooting ranges are available. Sutton Lake, 1,440 acres, and Elk River provide excellent fishing. Anglers may catch largemouth, smallmouth and spotted bass, walleye, channel catfish, bluegill and crappie in the lake. Elk River has all these warmwater species, plus muskellunge, and the tailwaters are stocked with trout. Accommodations are provided for the physically disabled angler and Class Q hunter. Corps of Engineers campgrounds at Bakers Run, south side of the lake, and at Gerald R. Freeman area on the north side provide camping facilities. Marina facilities are located at Bee Run and launch ramps are available on the north side of the lake and at the camping areas. Managed by WVDNR. Owned by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and WVDNR. For additional information contact: Resource Manager, Sutton Lake, P.O. Box 426, Sutton, WV 26601-0426, (304) 765-2816. Lake and daily fishing information, (304) 765-2705.

Handley WMA (784 acres) Pocahontas County. Access is by state Route 17, which intersects U.S. Route 219 at Edray approximately four miles north of Marlinton. From the Highland Scenic Highway, turn south on Forest Road 86 (Williams River Road) and state Route 17/4, following DNR signs to the area. Ten percent of the area is in openings and the remainder consists of rolling hills and scattered steep slopes covered by hardwood forest. These habitats support hunting for deer, bear, turkey, grouse and woodcock. Waterfowl can be found along the Williams River, especially in early season. The Williams River, which borders the western side of Handley for approximately 1.25 miles, is stocked with trout. Two small ponds and a 5-acre lake provide fishing for largemouth bass, bluegill and channel catfish. This lake is restricted to children 10 years of age or under and to handicapped individuals holding a Class Q license from March to May. Thirteen campsites with well water and vault toilets are available for a nominal fee. Owned and managed by WVDNR.

Huttonsville State Farm WMA (2,720 acres) Randolph County. Located just south of Huttonsville, this area can be accessed from state Route 219 or via state Route 250. Actively managed farmland, hardwood forest and proximity to the Monongahela National Forest provide sporting opportunities for a variety of species from mourning dove to black bear. Waterfowl hunting is available at small ponds and along the Tygart Valley River. Fishing for bass and panfish can be productive in the Tygart Valley River. Huttonsville Correctional Center is located within the WMA boundary. Safety zones are strictly enforced and a security force patrols the prison area. Owned by West Virginia Department of Agriculture. Leased and managed by WVDNR.

Morris Creek WMA (9,874 acres) Clay and Kanawha counties. Located near Clendenin, primary access is from county Route 67 along Morris Creek, or county route 65 in Leatherwood Creek. The area is steep and predominantly forested with hunting opportunities for deer, squirrel, turkey and bear. In addition, more than one mile of Elk River frontage is a feature of this area. Stream access to Elk River is available in the vicinity. Boat ramps are located at Queen Shoals and the Clendenin Water Plant. Camping is not permitted. Owned by the Bruce B. Cameron Foundation, Inc. and the B.B. and Louise W. Cameron Charitable Trust. Leased and managed by WVDNR. For maps and information, contact Wildlife Resources, Box 38, French Creek, WV 26218 or phone (304) 924-6211.

Smoke Camp WMA (252 acres) Lewis County. Located on the Right Fork of Freemans Creek Road. Access via county Route 9/5. Hunting opportunities exist for deer, turkey and small game. Camping is not allowed. Donated to the West Virginia Wildlife Endowment Fund. Owned and managed by WVDNR.

Stonecoal Lake WMA (3,000 acres) Lewis and Upshur counties. Located south of U.S. 33 and 119 between Weston and Buckhannon. The area is accessible from state Routes 15, 36 and 7. Hardwood forests cover 80 percent of the area with the remaining areas in wildlife clearings and brushy fields. Hunting opportunities abound for deer, turkey, squirrel and waterfowl. Stonecoal Lake, 550 acres, offers excellent angling opportunities for muskellunge, largemouth and smallmouth bass, walleye, crappie, channel catfish and bluegill, as well as rainbow, golden and brown trout. Concrete boat ramps are located at both ends of the lake and motors are restricted to 10 horsepower. Fishing accommodations provided for the physically disabled. Camping, swimming and open fires are not permitted. A private campground is located near the headwaters of the lake. Owned by Allegheny Energy Company. Leased to and managed by WVDNR.

Stonewall Jackson Lake WMA (18,289 acres) Lewis County. Access the area by using I-79 exits 96 and 91. Farmlands reverting to woodland and rolling hills with mixed hardwood forest combine to produce a high quality and diverse habitat that provides hunting for deer, turkey, small game and waterfowl. Bear are also found on the area. The 2,650-acre Stonewall Jackson Lake is home for many warmwater fish species, including largemouth bass, walleye, musky, crappie, sunfish and carp. Trout are stocked in the tailwater. Five public boat launching ramps are located at convenient points around the lake. Accomodations are provided for the physically disabled angler and Class Q hunter. A 300-yard rifle range is also available. Camping is available for a nominal fee on the adjacent state park campground. Owned by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Managed by WVDNR. For additional information contact: Resource Manager, Stonewall Jackson Lake, Route 3, Box 370, Brownsville Road, Weston WV 26452, (304) 269-4588. Lake and recreation information: (304) 269-7463.

Summersville Lake WMA (5,974 acres) Nicholas County. Located three miles south of Summersville on U.S. Route 19, the terrain ranges from rolling hills to vertical rock cliffs. Primarily forested, this area offers hunting for deer, turkey, bear, squirrel and grouse. The fish population in 2,790-acre Summersville Lake includes smallmouth and largemouth bass, crappie, bluegill, walleye and channel catfish. Rainbow trout are occasionally taken. Fishing accommodations are provided for the physically disabled. The tailwater is stocked with trout. Facilities available include picnic areas, restrooms, showers, trailer disposal stations and hiking areas. Camping is available on Corps of Engineers property and at private campgrounds. Owned by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Managed by WVDNR. For additional information contact: Resource Manager, Summersville Lake, Rural Route 2, Box 470, Summersville WV 26651-9802. (304) 872-3412. Lake and recreation information, (304) 872-5809.

Valley Bend WMA (31 acres) Randolph County. Located fifteen miles south of Elkins via state Routes 219 and 250. The area consists of two wetlands: a 10-acre natural wetland and an 8-acre man-made wetland flooded seasonally for waterfowl and migratory birds. HUNTING OPPORTUNITIES ARE LIMITED DUE TO THE SIZE OF THE AREA. Fishing opportunities exist along the Tygart River. No camping is allowed. Owned and managed by WVDNR.

Wallback WMA (11,757 acres) Clay, Kanawha and Roane counties. Take Wallback exit 34 off I-79 and follow DNR signs to the parking lot, or travel north of Clendenin on state Route 4 to King Shoals Road, or from Amma exit 25 from I-79 to Pigeon Run Road (county Route 29/9). Hilly topography prevails with varied habitat types providing hunting opportunities for deer, turkey and small game. Accommodations provided for the Class Q hunter. Includes approximately 3 miles of Elk River frontage along state Route 4 and county Route 5. Angling opportunities are excellent for bass, walleye, muskellunge and catfish in the Elk River and stocked trout in Laurel Creek. Camping is not permitted. Owned by WVDNR.



District 4

Anawalt Lake WMA (1,792 acres) McDowell County. Located approximately 20 miles southeast of Welch, access is provided by following state Route 103 south from Welch to state Route 161. Follow state Route 161 and county Route 84 to Anawalt. From Anawalt take county Route 8 to the Wildlife Management Area. Anawalt WMA is primarily a mixed hardwood forest with oak-hickory forest types on drier sites and yellow poplar/black cherry in the coves. Several administrative roads and trails provide interior access for foot travel only. The area supports hunting opportunities for deer, bear, squirrel, turkey and ruffed grouse. The 7-acre impoundment supports a warmwater fishery and is stocked with trout from February through May. Camping is prohibited. Owned by WVDNR.

Berwind Lake WMA (18,000 acres) McDowell County. The area is located 12 miles south of Welch on state Routes 16 and 12/4. Rugged forest terrain offers hunting opportunities for deer, turkey, raccoon and squirrel. Berwind Lake encompasses 20 acres and provides fishing for warmwater species and trout. The area has eight primitive camp sites which are under the direction of the WVDNR Parks and Recreation Section. Owned by the Berwind Land Corporation and leased to and managed by WVDNR. Recreational facilities managed by DNR Parks and Recreation Section.

Beury Mountain WMA (3,061 acres) Fayette County. Area adjoins southern border of Babcock State Park. Access is provided by following U.S. Route 60 east to Lookout, then take state Route 41 south to Landisburg. Follow county Route 19/33 approximately 3 miles to the area. The topography consists of gentle to steep slopes covered with mixed hardwood and oak-hickory forests. Hunting is best for deer, turkey and squirrel. Several older clearcuts provide limited hunting opportunities for upland wildlife. Camping is prohibited on the WMA. However, camping is available nearby at Babcock State Park. Owned by WVDNR.

Bluestone Lake WMA (18,019 acres) Summers, Mercer and Monroe counties. This popular lake is located one mile east of Hinton on state Route 20, or four miles west of Pipestem State Park on state Route 20. Topography ranges from flat bottomlands to rolling uplands, steep mountains and cliffs. Forests are predominantly oak-hickory. Hunters will find opportunities for deer, squirrel and raccoon, while turkey hunting is among the best in the Eastern United States. A 100-yard rifle range is also located on the area. Trappers can expect to find mink, muskrat, fox and bobcat. The New River divides the area. New River above Bluestone Lake offers excellent float and bank fishing opportunities for smallmouth bass and channel catfish. Bluestone Lake, 1,970 acres, provides excellent warmwater fishing for catfish, largemouth and smallmouth bass, striped bass, panfish and musky. Six carry-down boat launching ramps are available. Camping can be enjoyed at private and public campgrounds on and near the area. Managed by WVDNR. Recreational facilities managed by DNR Parks and Recreation Section. Owned by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. For additional information contact: Resource Manager, Bluestone Lake, 701 Miller Ave., Hinton WV 25951-2643, (304) 466-1234. For lake and recreation information call (304) 466-0156.

Meadow River WMA (2,374 acres) Greenbrier County. The area is accessible from the Dawson or Sam Black Church exits of I-64. Larger tracts of land along Meadow River can be found by taking U.S. Route 60 from Sam Black Church to county Route 60/18 near Rupert. Topography ranges from flat bottomland to gentle slopes. This area is primarily wetland habitat. Waterfowl, woodcock, deer, raccoon, turkey, grouse and squirrel are available for hunting. No camping available. Owned by WVDNR and Division of Highways.

Moncove Lake WMA (775 acres) Monroe County. Access the area by following state Route 3 from Union east to Gap Mills and taking state Route 8 for six miles. Oak-hickory forest covers most of the area, which ranges from gently rolling hills to steep mountain sides with elevations from 2,503 to 3,100 feet. Old fields and wildlife openings are scattered throughout the area. Hunting opportunities are best for deer, turkey, squirrel, grouse, rabbit and waterfowl. Moncove Lake, 144 acres, provides warmwater fishing for largemouth bass, bluegill and channel catfish. Boat motors are restricted to 5 horsepower or less. All recreational facilities are part of Moncove Lake State Park, which is located along state Route 8/2 that circles the lake, and hunting is prohibited within this area. Fifty campsites and the recreational facilities are maintained by the DNR Parks and Recreation Section. A camping fee is charged. Owned by WVDNR.

Plum Orchard Lake WMA (3,201 acres) Fayette County. To reach this area, exit the West Virginia Turnpike (I-77) at the Pax or Mossy interchange and follow state Routes 23 and 23/1. To access from U.S. Route 19, take state Route 15 from Oak Hill to Mossy then take state Routes 23 and 23/1. The topography consists of gentle to steep slopes covered in oak-hickory forests. Old revegetated strip benches with highwalls remain. Hunting is best for turkey, squirrel, raccoon and waterfowl. A 175-yard rifle range is available for shooters. Plum Orchard Lake, 202 acres, will please the angler with its good populations of sunfish, largemouth bass, channel catfish and crappie. Citation-size bluegill are frequently caught. Boat launching ramps are located on the lake. Rustic camping facilities include 23 sites at Beech Bottom and 18 sites on Dogwood Ridge with centrally located wells and vault toilets. Camping areas are managed by DNR Parks and Recreation Section. Water supply systems are available for mobile units. A nominal camping fee is charged. Owned by WVDNR.

R.D. Bailey Lake WMA (17,280 acres) Mingo and Wyoming counties. Located 15 miles west of Pineville on state Route 97. Mostly oak-hickory forest covers the rugged terrain, which is characterized by narrow valleys and steep ridges, with elevations ranging from 500 to 1,200 feet. Large expanses of forest provide good hunting opportunities for deer (archery only), squirrel, ruffed grouse, turkey, raccoon and black bear. A 200-yard rifle range is located on the area. Fox, bobcat, skunk, opossum, mink and muskrat can be trapped on the area. R.D. Bailey Lake, 630 acres, provides excellent warmwater fishing for largemouth and smallmouth bass, sunfish, hybrid striped bass, crappie, catfish, carp, walleye and tiger musky. Trout are stocked in the tailwater. A Corps of Engineers-operated 169-site camping area along the Guyandotte River is open from May 1 to November 1. A public boat launching site is located at the head of the lake. Managed by WVDNR. Owned by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. For additional information contact: Resource Manager, R.D. Bailey Lake, P.O. Drawer 70, Justice WV 24851-0070, (304) 664-3229. Lake and recreation information, (304) 664-9587.

Tate Lohr WMA (500 acres) Mercer County. Located four miles south of Oakvale and is accessible by U.S. Route 460 and county Routes 219/6, 219/8 and 219/9. The area provides limited hunting opportunities for deer, turkey and squirrel. No camping is permitted. Owned and managed by WVDNR.

Tug Fork WMA (2,308 acres) McDowell County. Located approximately 10 miles northeast of Welch, access is provided by following U.S. Route 52 north to Premier. Several administrative roads and trails provide interior access for foot travel only. The WMA consists primarily of mixed hardwood forest with oak-hickory forest types on drier sites and yellow poplar/black cherry in the coves. The area offers hunting opportunities for squirrel, deer, bear, turkey and ruffed grouse. Tug Fork River is the northern border of the area and supports a warmwater fishery. Camping and the use of ATVs on the area are prohibited. Owned by WVDNR.



District 5

Amherst/Plymouth WMA (7,061 acres) Putnam County. Located between Bancroft and Hometown on state Route 62 and Heizer Creek and Manila Creek roads off state Route 62 north of Poca. The terrain is steep and over 90 percent is covered by a young oak-hickory forest. Hunting opportunities are provided for deer, turkey, squirrel, rabbit, raccoon and grouse. Shoreline fishing is popular in the Guano Creek backwater of the Kanawha River and along the 1 1/4-mile section of the Kanawha River bordering the area between Bancroft and Hometown. Flathead catfish, channel catfish, freshwater drum, hybrid striped bass, white bass, sauger and carp are the most common species caught. Camping is not permitted. Owned by Amherst Industries Inc. Managed by WVDNR.

Beech Fork Lake WMA (7,531 acres) Cabell and Wayne counties. Located five miles south of Huntington, the area can be accessed from the west via state Route 152 and from the northeast via state Route 10 and Heath Creek Road. The terrain is steep and over 85 percent is covered by oak-hickory-pine forest. Hunting opportunities are provided for deer, turkey, squirrel, raccoon, grouse, fox, rabbit, woodcock, mourning dove and waterfowl. Beech Fork Lake, 720 acres, provides fishing for a wide variety of warmwater sportfish, including largemouth and spotted bass, crappie, bluegill, channel catfish, tiger musky, saugeye and hybrid striped bass. Trout are stocked in the 5-acre Millers Fork pond (children 10 years of age and under, and Handicap Fishing Area March through May). Two public boat ramps and a 275-site year-round campground are available. A camping fee is charged. The area also features a 100-yard shooting range. Managed by WVDNR and COE. Owned by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. State park information: (304) 528-5794. Lake and recreation information, (304) 525-4831.

Big Ugly WMA (6,421 acres) Lincoln County. Located 25 miles south of Hamlin off state Route 7, or 15 miles northwest of Logan off state Route 7 near the town of Leet. The terrain is steep. A mature upland hardwood forest blankets more than 95 percent of the area. Big Ugly is managed primarily for deer, squirrel, turkey, grouse and raccoon. The area features a 100-yard shooting range. Owned by The Forest Land Group. Leased to and managed by WVDNR.

Chief Cornstalk WMA (11,772 acres) Mason County. Accessible by Nine-Mile Road traveling westward from U.S. Route 35 near Southside. The area can also be reached from state Route 2, five miles south of Gallipolis Ferry by turning onto Crab Creek Road leading east to Arlee and then onto the area. Gently rolling to moderately steep slopes comprise most of the area. The area is about 85 percent hardwood forest. Good hunting opportunities exist for deer, turkey, squirrel and grouse. Trapping for raccoon, mink, fox and muskrat is excellent and a special permit is required from the district biologist or area manager. A shooting range is available. A 5-acre lake offers fishing for largemouth bass, bluegill and channel catfish. Catchable-sized trout are stocked in the lake. Rustic tent or small camping sites with vault toilets are available for a nominal fee. Owned and managed by WVDNR.

East Lynn Lake WMA (22,928 acres) Wayne County. Located 15 miles southeast of Wayne, access to the area situated north of the lake is via state Route 37, and the southern portion can be reached via state Route 152. The terrain is steep and about 90 percent is covered by oak-hickory forest, with hunting opportunities for bear, deer, turkey, raccoon, grouse, squirrel and rabbit. Limited waterfowl hunting is available. Numerous types of warmwater game fish are available in the 1,005-acre East Lynn Lake, with largemouth and spotted bass, saugeye, hybrid striped bass, black crappie, channel catfish and musky providing plenty of action for the angler. The tailwater of the dam and 5-acre Lick Creek Pond are stocked with trout. Campground is operated by COE and a camping fee is charged. Owned by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Managed by WVDNR and COE. For additional information contact: Resource Manager, East Lynn Lake, HC 85, Box 35-C, East Lynn WV 25512. Terlephone (304) 849-2355.

Fork Creek WMA (7,000 acres) Boone County. The area is located one mile northwest of Nellis off county Route 2. Hardwood forest covers most of the steep slopes and narrow valleys, which provide hunting opportunities for bear, deer, turkey, squirrel, fox and raccoon. The area features a 100-yard shooting range. Campsites with vault toilets are available for a nominal fee. Owned by Island Creek Coal Corporation. Leased to and managed by WVDNR.

Green Bottom WMA (1,096 acres) Cabell and Mason counties. The area is located 16 miles north of Huntington, access is via state Route 2. The area contains 300 acres of forest, 180 acres of wetland, 680 acres of agricultural land, and 40 acres of open water. It is bordered on the north by the Ohio River--the state’s largest and most productive fishery. Popular species taken from this section of the river include sauger, smallmouth bass, hybrid striped bass, channel catfish, crappie, freshwater drum and carp. Primary game species include deer, rabbit, mourning dove and waterfowl (waterfowl hunting is by permit only during early October). Deer hunters are required to use primitive weapons--muzzleloading firearms and archery equipment. No camping is allowed. Managed by WVDNR. Owned by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and WVDNR.

Hilbert WMA (289 acres) Lincoln County. The area is located approximately two miles northwest of Sod, and access is via state Route 124 and Joes Creek Road. The terrain is steep and over 95 percent is covered by oak-hickory forest. Hunting prospects include deer, turkey, squirrel, grouse and fox. No camping is allowed and fishing facilities do not exist on the area. Owned by WVDNR.

Laurel Lake WMA (12,854 acres) Mingo County. Located northeast of Lenore off state Route 65, this rugged area features steep slopes with narrow ridges and valleys covered with mixed hardwood forest, numerous hemlocks and a thick understory. Hunting opportunities exist for deer, bear, turkey, raccoon, grouse and squirrel. Laurel Lake, 29 acres, provides fishing for channel catfish, largemouth bass and bluegill. Catchable-sized trout are stocked monthly from February through May. No camping is allowed. Owned by the Forest Land Group and the WVDNR. Managed by WVDNR.

McClintic WMA (3,655 acres) Mason County. The area is located five miles north of Point Pleasant or eight miles south of the city of Mason off state Route 62 via Fairgrounds Road (CR12), follow DNR signs. McClintic contains the greatest variety of wildlife habitats to be found on any West Virginia WMA. Approximately 600 acres of farmland, 1,100 acres of brushland, 180 acres of wetland, and 1,775 acres of mixed hardwood forest combine to provide excellent hunting for deer, waterfowl, turkey, squirrel, rabbit, mourning dove and woodcock. Waterfowl hunting on a protion of the area is by permit only during early October. Trapping for muskrat, mink, beaver and raccoon is productive and requires a special permit from the area manager. The area features a 100-yard shooting range. Warmwater fishing is allowed in 29 of the area’s 31 ponds, with bass and bluegill anglers enjoying the greatest success. Channel catfish and northern pike are stocked in several ponds. Rustic campsites with vault toilets and drinking water are available at a nominal fee. Owned by WVDNR.

Mill Creek WMA (1,470 acres) Cabell County. The area is located three miles north of Milton and access is via county Route 13 (Johns Branch Road). The terrain is steep and over 95 percent is covered by oak-hickory-pine forest, providing hunting opportunities for deer, turkey, grouse, squirrel, raccoon, rabbit and fox. Camping is not permitted. Owned by WVDNR.

Upper Mud River WMA (1,425 acres) Lincoln County. The area is located approximately 12 miles south of Hamlin on county Route 7 (Upper Mud River Road). The terrain is steep and 90 percent is covered by oak-hickory forest, with hunting opportunities for deer, turkey, raccoon, grouse, squirrel, rabbit and waterfowl. The major fish species in the 306-acre lake are muskellunge, largemouth bass, bluegill, crappie and channel catfish. Two boat launch ramps are situated on the area and boat motors are limited to 10 horsepower. No camping is allowed. Owned by the Lincoln County Commission. Managed by WVDNR.



District 6

Conaway Run Lake WMA (630 acres) Tyler County. The area can be accessed off state Route 18 approximately 10 miles south of Middlebourne. Hardwood forest and brush cover most of the area. The most abundant big game animal is the white-tailed deer. Many species of small game are present, but hunting is best for squirrel, rabbit and grouse. Limited hunting opportunities exist for migratory game birds. Furbearers on the area include fox, raccoon, mink, muskrat and beaver. Conaway Run Lake, 30 acres, provides fishing for trout, largemouth bass, channel catfish and bluegill. Two small-boat launching ramps, a handicapped fishing pier and a 100-yard shooting range are located on the area. Ten campsites with wellwater and vault toilets are available for a nominal fee. Owned by WVDNR.

Frozen Camp WMA (2,735 acres) Jackson County. Located east of Ripley and south of state Route 33 at Marshall, access is provided at Marshall and also from state Route 28 at Frozen Camp. The terrain is hilly with wooded slopes, some open bottomland and a few open ridgetops. Hunting opportunities exist for deer, turkey, squirrel, grouse, rabbit and waterfowl. Two small impoundments of 22 acres and 20 acres are located on the area. Both offer fishing for largemouth bass, bluegill and channel catfish, and are restricted to electric motors only. The lake on the Left Fork is accessible only by foot and the lake on the Right Fork has a concrete boat ramp. A 200-yard public shooting range is located on the area. Camping is not permitted. Owned by WVDNR.

Hughes River WMA (10,000 acres) Ritchie and Wirt counties. The area is located on both sides of state Route 47, 15 miles east of Parkersburg. Topography ranges from river bottoms to steep slopes. Cover types include both mature oak-hickory and patchwork of young pine-hardwood stands created by even-aged timber management. Good food and cover conditions exist for turkey, deer and grouse. Squirrel and rabbit hunting can also be rewarding. A section has been designated for handicapped hunter access, with graveled road, turn-arounds and pull-offs for sportsmen with Class Q licenses. Good smallmouth bass, muskellunge, channel catfish and panfish fishing is available in the Little Kanawha and Hughes rivers, which border part of the area. Camping is not permitted. Owned by The Forest Land Group and leased to the WVDNR. Recently, Martin Marietta leased an adjacent 278 acres to the DNR and this land has been made part of the area.

Ritchie Mines WMA (2,300 acres) Ritchie County. Located on Macfarlan Creek in the southwestern part of the county. Access to the northern portion of the area is by state Routes 17 and 17/4 at Mellin. The southern portion can be reached, at least seasonally, by state Route 47 and 30 at Macfarlan. The somewhat rugged and wooded terrain provides hunting for deer, turkey, squirrel, grouse and raccoon. The remains of an historically significant asphalt mine are located on the area. Camping is not permitted. Owned by WVDNR.

Sand Hill WMA (967 acres) Wood and Ritchie counties. Located 12 miles east of Parkersburg on either side of U.S. Route 50. Access to the northern portion of the area (267 acres) is from old U.S. Route 50 at the Wood/Ritchie county line. This portion has a significant amount of acreage in a safety zone around an underground sandstone mine. Access to the southern portion is either directly from U.S. Route 50 at the county line or from the Volcano Road (Route 28) south of Mountwood Park. The hilly wooded terrain is interspersed with haul roads and landings from recent timbering activity and old oil and gas development. The forest is oak-hickory and hunting prospects are best for deer, turkey, squirrel, rabbit and grouse. Owned by CNG Transmission Corporation and leased to the WVDNR.

Stumptown WMA (1,674 acres) Calhoun and Gilmer counties. Located north of U.S. Route 33 at Stumptown on Lower Run. Access from Route 33 is by county Route 39 at Lockney and county Route 46 at Normantown. From county Route 7 northwest of Stumptown the area is accessible via county Routes 7/9 at Wolf Run and 7/10 at Mikes Run. The hilly wooded terrain consists of oak-hickory and oak-pine forest and provides hunting for deer and turkey in addition to raccoon, squirrel and grouse. The area includes parts of Lower Run and Middle Run watersheds--all intermittent streams--and fishing prospects are extremely limited. Camping is not permitted. Owned by WVDNR.

The Jug WMA (2,065 acres) Tyler County. Located 1.5 miles east of Middlebourne off state Route 18, access may be limited in bad weather or by high water. For year-round access use state Route 46 from Centerville or state Route 7 from Middlebourne. Topography varies from river bottoms to rolling hills with numerous fields scattered among pines and mixed hardwood forests. Hunting prospects are excellent for deer, grouse, squirrel and rabbit. Waterfowl and turkey hunting is also available. Middle Island Creek is highly regarded as a native musky stream and also contains smallmouth and spotted bass, sunfish, channel and flathead catfish and freshwater drum. Camping is not permitted. Owned by WVDNR.

Woodrum WMA (1,700 acres) Jackson County. Located on the Middle Fork of the Pocatalico River, Woodrum WMA can be reached from I-77 either by state Route 42 at Romance or by state Route 19 at Kentuck. The area’s hilly terrain is comprised mostly of oak-hickory and oak-pine timber interspersed with abandoned farms. Hunting opportunities exist for deer, turkey, squirrel, grouse, rabbit and waterfowl. Woodrum Lake, a 240-acre impoundment, offers good fishing for largemouth and spotted bass, bluegill, crappie and muskellunge. A concrete boat ramp is located at the upper end of the lake. Motors are restricted to 10 horsepower or less. Camping is not permitted. Owned by WVDNR.



National Forests
National Forests are managed under cooperative agreement with the U.S. Forest Service

NOTE: Each Wildlife Management Area on the national forests contains interspersed private land within their boundary. Permission is required on all private land before hunting, fishing or trapping.

Monongahela National Forest

Beaver Dam WMA (37,674 acres) Randolph County. U.S. Route 33 and state Routes 22, 40, 27 and 31 provide access to the area. It is primarily rugged mountain terrain covered in mixed hardwood stands. The hunter will find numerous opportunities for turkey, bear, deer, snowshoe hare in higher elevations, grouse and woodcock. Accommodations are provided for the Class Q hunter. The trapper should expect to find beaver, fox and raccoon. Excellent fishing for trout is available in Shavers Fork, Glady Fork, Laurel Fork River and their tributaries. Seventeen campsites are maintained at Laurel Fork with water pump and outdoor toilets. The area contains Laurel Fork North and South Wilderness Areas with a combined area of 12,200 acres. Owned by U.S. Forest Service.

Blackwater WMA (58,978 acres) Tucker and Preston counties. U.S. Route 219 and state Routes 72 and 32 run through the area. Blackwater is primarily mountainous terrain covered in oak-hickory, northern hardwoods, spruce-fir and white pine forests with 2,743 acres of openings scattered throughout the area. Hunting opportunities abound for bear, turkey, deer, snowshoe hare in higher elevations, squirrel and grouse. Accommodations are provided for the Class Q hunter. Trapping for fisher, beaver, fox, raccoon and bobcat is productive. Blackwater River, Horseshoe Run, Clover Run and Slip Hill Run provide excellent trout fishing. Horseshoe Recreation Area is located along state Route 7 and contains ten developed campsites, several picnic areas, picnic shelters and pit toilets. The recreation area is closed during the winter months, and opens May 30. Seventy-five primitive campsites are located along Canaan Loop Road. Owned by U.S. Forest Service.

Cheat WMA (80, 771 acres) Randolph County. Access is by U.S. Routes 219 and 250 or state Routes 43, 37 and 64. Maple, beech and birch cover 59 percent of the mountainous terrain, red spruce occupies 19 percent and oak-hickory 18 percent. The hunter can expect to find bear, turkey, deer, snowshoe hare in higher elevations, squirrel, grouse and woodcock. Beaver, fox, raccoon and bobcat trapping is popular. Trout fishing is available in 302 miles of streams, Shavers Fork and parts of the Tygart River. Primitive campsites are distributed throughout the area. Owned by U.S. Forest Service.

Cranberry WMA (158,147 acres) Nicholas, Webster, Pocahontas and Greenbrier counties. State Routes 150, 39, 7, 48 and 46 provide access to the area. Elevations range from 1,900 to 4,600 feet in mountainous terrain covered with mature hardwood forests. Hunting for bear, turkey, deer, limited showshoe hare in higher elevations and squirrel is very productive. Accommodations are provided for the Class Q hunter. Summit Lake, 42 acres, North and South forks of the Cherry River, Cherry River, Williams River and Cranberry River provide excellent trout fishing. Camping areas are located at Cranberry, Summit Lake, Bishop Knob and Big Rock. The area contains the Cranberry Wilderness Area, totalling 35,864 acres. Owned by U.S. Forest Service.

Little River WMA (124,483 acres) Pocahontas County. Access the area from U.S. Route 250 as well as state Route 28 and 92. Northern hardwoods cover the mountainous terrain with oak-hickory and black cherry. White pine and red pine are also present. Good hunting exists for turkey, bear, deer, squirrel, grouse, woodcock and snowshoe hare in higher elevations. Trapping for beaver, fox, raccoon and bobcat is popular and productive. Buffalo Lake, 21 acres, provides good trout fishing. Fishing for warmwater species and trout is possible in 353 miles of streams. Camping is available at Island Creek, Abe Run, Frank Mountain, Little River West, Snorting Lick and West Fork of the Greenbrier River. Owned by U.S. Forest Service.

Neola WMA (97,928 acres) Greenbrier and Pocahontas counties. Access is available from state Routes 92, 28, 84 and 39. Oak-hickory and oak-pine forests cover 90 percent of the rugged terrain, and hunting for turkey, deer, bear, squirrel, grouse, rabbit and waterfowl can be extremely rewarding. Accommodations are provided for the Class Q hunter. Sherwood Lake, 167 acres, and the Greenbrier River provide excellent warmwater fishing. North Fork of Anthony Creek, Meadow Creek and Laurel Run offer ideal trout fishing. Camping is available at Lake Sherwood Recreation complex and Blue Bend Recreation Area. Calvin Price State Forest is located within the area. Owned by U.S. Forest Service.

Otter Creek WMA (68,782 acres) Randolph and Tucker counties. Access is via U.S. Routes 219 and 33 and state Routes 72 and 32. The area consists of mountainous terrain ranging in elevation from 1,660 to 4,008 feet and is covered in mixed hardwood forests. Hunters will find bear, deer, turkey, snowshoe hare in higher elevations, squirrel and grouse. Accommodations are provided for the Class Q hunter. Anglers will enjoy trout fishing in Shavers Fork River, Dry Fork River, Glady Fork, Laurel Fork, Otter Creek and many miles of smaller tributaries. Camping can be found at Stuart and Bear Heaven recreation areas. This area contains the Otter Creek Wilderness Area with a total of 20,000 acres. Owned by U.S. Forest Service.

Potomac WMA (139,786 acres) Randolph, Pendleton, Grant and Tucker counties. Access by U.S. Routes 33 and 220, and state Routes 28, 29 and 41. Elevations vary from 900 to 4,862 feet. Oak-hickory and northern hardwoods comprise the forests of this rugged area, which offers hunting for turkey, deer, bear, squirrel, grouse and rabbit. Accommodations are provided for the Class Q hunter. The North Fork of the South Branch and the main South Branch of the Potomac River, Red Creek, Gandy Creek, Dry Fork and Spruce Knob Lake offer trout fishing at its best. Numerous public use camping areas are maintained by the U.S. Forest Service. Potomac WMA contains Dolly Sods Wilderness Area, which encompasses 10,218 acres. Owned by U.S. Forest Service.

Rimel WMA (67,251 acres) Pocahontas County. Access is by state Routes 39, 28, 92 and 84. Thirty miles of paved roads and 46 miles of unpaved secondary roads traverse the area. The area is composed of mountainous terrain covered by oak-hickory, oak-pine and northern hardwood forests. Turkey, bear, deer, squirrel, grouse and rabbit are the principal game species. Accommodations are provided for the Class Q hunter. Knapps Creek, Seneca Lake and several smaller streams provide native and stocked trout fishing. Pocahontas and Bird Run campgrounds, Seneca State Forest and Watoga State Park are within the area. Seneca and Watoga have camping facilities. Owned by U.S. Forest Service.

Tea Creek WMA (67,919 acres) Pocahontas, Randolph and Webster counties. Access is primarily by U.S. Route 219. Northern hardwood forests cover the mountainous terrain where hunting for bear, deer, turkey, snowshoe hare in higher elevations, squirrel and grouse can be quite productive. Accommodations are provided for the Class Q hunter. Greenbrier, Williams, Elk and Gauley rivers provide trout and warmwater fishing. The Greenbrier River is well suited for float trip or wade fishing for smallmouth bass or rock bass. Approximately 70 miles of native trout streams are available. Camping areas are located at Day Run and Tea Creek campgrounds. Owned by U.S. Forest Service.

George Washington National Forest

Shenandoah WMA (49,106) Pendleton County. State Routes 21, 30 and 3 provide access to this area which is made up of mountainous terrain with elevations ranging from 1.250 to 4.397 feet. The area is covered primarily by oak-hickory forests. Hunters will find deer, bear, turkey, squirrel and grouse. Brandywine Lake, 6 acres, provides trout fishing and the 8-acre Camp Run Lake provides warmwater fishing for largemouth bass and channel catfish. Camping is available at Brandywine Lake and Camp Run. The Westside shooting range is available for public use. Owned by U.S. Forest Service.

Wardensville WMA (55,327 acres) Hampshire and Hardy counties. Access is via state Route 59, 23/10, 5/1 and 16. Oak-hickory forest predominates on the mountainous terrain, which provides hunting for turkey, bear, deer, squirrel and grouse. Trout Pond, 2 acres, Rock Cliff Lake, 16 acres, and 61 miles of streams provide fishing for trout, while other anglers will enjoy the smallmouth bass, rock bass and redbreast sunfish fishing in Cacapon and Lost rivers. Camping is available at Trout Pond, Rock Cliff Lake, Wolf Gap and Hawk recreation areas. Owned by U.S. Forest Service.

Jefferson National Forest

Potts Creek WMA (18,526 acres) Monroe County. Accessible by state Route 15, 17 or 20. Oak-pine forests covers the mountainous terrain that ranges in elevation from 2,000 to 3,600 feet. Hunting in this area is good for bear, deer, turkey, grouse, rabbit and squirrel. Potts Creek and the North and South forks of Potts Creek provide trout fishing. No camping sites are available. Owned by U.S. Forest Service.



State Forests

Developed recreational facilities on State Forests are operated and maintained by the Division of Natural Resources Parks and Recreation section, West Virginia Department of Commerce, Labor and Environmental Resources. Any questions bout these facilities should be directed to the Division of Tourism and Parks address in the front of this booklet.

 

Cabwaylingo State Forest (8,125 acres) Wayne County. The forest is located on state Route 35 four miles off U.S. Route 152. Terrain is hilly to steep with gentle slopes in bottomlands and ridgetops. Hunting is best for squirrel, rabbit, grouse, fox and raccoon. The deer population is low at the present time. The West Fork of Twelve Pole Creek provides trout fishing. Campgrounds and cabins are available for a fee. Owned by the WVDNR.

Calvin Price State Forest (10,000 acres) Pocahontas County. This forest is accessible from state Route 39 east of Marlinton. Moderately rugged terrain covered in mixed hardwoods and pine is the setting for deer, bear, turkey, squirrel and grouse hunting. Camping, cabins and recreational facilities are located on adjoining Watoga State Park. Owned by WVDNR.

Camp Creek State Forest (5,987 acres) Mercer County. From exit 20 of the West Virginia Turnpike (I-77), turn onto state Route 19/5 and follow the signs for two miles. Mountainous terrain with narrow ridgetops and some rock outcroppings covered by oak-hickory forest offer hunting for deer, turkey, squirrel, grouse, raccoon and fox. Camp Creek provides trout fishing. Twelve rustic campsites are available. Three hundred acres are designated as a state park where no hunting is permitted; the area is posted. Owned by WVDNR.

Coopers Rock State Forest (12,698 acres) Preston and Monongalia counties. Located 10 miles east of Morgantown on I-68, it is comprised of forested, mountainous terrain with gently sloping areas on ridgetops and numerous rock outcroppings. Coopers Rock offers hunting for deer, turkey, squirrel and grouse. Coopers Rock Lake offers trout, largemouth bass and bluegill fishing opportunities. Camping is available in designated areas for a fee. Owned by WNDNR.

Greenbrier State Forest (5,130 acres) Greenbrier County. Located on state Route 60/14, 1/5 miles south of exit 175 of I-64, the forest is also accessible from state Route 60/34 from White Sulpur Springs or state Route 6/2 from Monroe County. This area features mountainous terrain covered with mature hardwood forests and is dominated by Kates Mountain (3.388 feet). The hunter can expect to find bear, deer, turkey, grouse and squirrel. Twelve cabins and 16 campsites are open April 15 through October 31 for a fee. Archery and muzzleloading rifle ranges available. Owned by WVDNR.

Kanawha State Forest (9,250 acres) Kanawha County. From exit 58-A of I-64, follow state Route 214 to the second traffic light, turn left and follow Kanawha State Forest signs. The terrain ranges from stream bottoms to moderate slopes covered with mixed hardwoods. Principal game species are deer, turkey, raccoon, squirrel, rabbit, fox and grouse. A rifle range is available for shooters. Camping is available for a fee. Owned by WVDNR.

Kumbrabow State Forest (9,165 acres) Randolph County. Access can be gained by a rock base road off U.S. Routes 219 and 15, 32 miles south of Elkins. Primarily forested mountainous terrain at Kumbrabow offers hunting for deer, bear, turkey and grouse. Five rustic cabins and 13 rustic campgrounds are available for a fee. Camping season runs from April 15 to December 4. Owned by WVDNR.

Panther State Forest (10,640 acres) McDowell County. From the town of Panther take state Routes 3/1 and 3/2. Panther is comprised of extremely mountainous terrain with flat, narrow ridgetops and is almost completely forested. Hunting squirrel and grouse is good on the area. Only bow hunting is permitted for deer and trapping is mainly for fox and bobcats. Panther Creek provides stocked trout fishing. Six primitive campsites are available for a fee. Owned by WVDNR.

Seneca State Forest (11,500 acres) Pocahontas County. The area is located along state Route 28, 10 miles south of Green Bank. Pine-hardwood forests cover the gently sloping to hilly terrain ranging in elevation from 2,000 to 3,600 feet. Hunters can expect to find deer, bear, turkey, squirrel and grouse. Seneca Lake, 3 acres, provides warmwater and trout fishing. Rustic cabins and campsites are located throughout the forest. Owned by WVDNR.



Westvaco's West Virginia Woodlands Westvaco Corporation makes both the Springfield and Hughes River Wildlife Management Areas (approximately 10,000 acres on each) available to the public. Westvaco also allows outdoor recreation on an additional 350,000 acres of its managed timberlands in the State. A permit (valid for two years) is required to hunt, trap or fish on Westvaco lands. It may be obtained for $5 from Westvaco, P.O. Box 577, Rupert, WV 25984. Other forms of recreation such as hiking and berry picking require no specific permission. Westvaco does not allow overnight camping or the operation of ATVs on its lands.



Rules And Regulations Governing
Public Use Of West Virginia Wildlife Management Areas

General
The Division of Natural Resources assumes no responsibility for any personal property used or left on any area. If such property is abandoned or left unattended for more than 48 hours the Division may remove and dispose of the property in accordance with applicable provisions of the West Virginia Code.

  • Camping on wildlife management areas is permitted in designated areas only. Campsite rental fees must be paid before occupying the campsite.
  • Fires are permitted only in fireplaces, fire rings, or grates provided on the area or in other areas as designated by the Division. No fires may be left unattended.
  • Grazing livestock on a wildlife management area is illegal without first obtaining a special use permit from the Division. 
  • Loud or excessive noise, disorderly conduct, or other disturbances are prohibited.
  • It is illegal to cut, damage, deface, or destroy any building, rock, shrub, sign, tree, or other property on a wildlife management area.
  • It is illegal to remove any man-made or natural object from a wildlife management area, except game and fish legally taken during the open seasons as prescribed by 58 C.S.R. Objects which may not be removed include, but are not limited to, animals, plants, rocks and minerals, sand, and historical or archaeological artifacts.
  • Only portable tree stands may be used on public lands.

 

Vehicles
The maximum speed limit for vehicles is thirty (30) miles per hour unless a lower speed limit is posted. Drivers must observe all other traffic signs or directions as posted on the area. Driving any vehicle in a manner which creates a nuisance to others by repetitive or continuous cruising is prohibited. The use of all-terrain vehicles (ATVs), motorbikes, and snowmobiles is prohibited except where specifically permitted by posted signs on designated roads and trails. Driving any vehicle, ATV, snowmobile, or motorbike in a manner so as to harass, chase, or annoy any animal or bird is prohibited.

Bicycles And Horses
The use of bicycles or horses is permitted only on roads normally open to public travel and on designated routes as posted on the area. Groups of 10 or more people must obtain a permit from the District Game Biologist or area manager prior to riding on any designated route. Group size will be limited to a maximum of 25 people. Competitive events are not permitted on wildlife management areas. Group use is prohibited during spring gobbler season and between October 10 and December 31 except on Sundays. No more than two groups may use a designated route on a wildlife management area during each daylight period. Horses are not permitted in designated camping areas. Where horses are kept in concentrations to create a solid waste problem, the owner(s) shall be responsible for the removal and disposal of any waste produced by the animal(s). Any horse feed brought onto a wildlife management area must be locally obtained or be pelletized horse feed.

Public Shooting Ranges
Hours of operation will be posted at the entrance to each public shooting range and no person may use the range except during posted hours. A range may be temporarily closed at the discretion of the responsible District Game Biologist or the area wildlife manager. All persons using a public shooting range must obey all posted range safety rules. Glass or metal containers may not be used as targets on any public shooting range. Only paper, clay or metal silhouette targets may be used on public shooting ranges without prior approval from the District Game Biologist or the area wildlife manager. After use, all targets or silhouettes must be removed from the range by the shooter or disposed of in containers provided at the range. Alcoholic beverages are prohibited within the boundaries of all public shooting ranges. No person may handle a weapon at a public shooting range while under the influence of alcohol, a controlled substance or other drug, or while under the combined influence of alcohol and a controlled substance or other drug. No person under 16 years of age may use a public shooting range unless directly supervised by an adult (18 years of age or older) except those persons under 16 years of age who possess a valid West Virginia hunting license. All firearms must be unloaded and firearm handling must cease while any person is forward of the firing line. Firearms may be loaded and discharged only at established shooting stations. The firing line shall be defined as the line directly in front of and parallel to the shooting benches. No person may move forward of the firing line until all firing has ceased, all users acknowledge an “all clear” command and all firearms have been unloaded and placed on the shooting benches. Firearms must be pointed downrange at all times. Use of fully automatic firearms is prohibited unless specifically authorized by the District Game Biologist.



Special Regulations

No person may create a shoreline development of any kind on the lands and waters under the administrative control of the Division within the boundaries of Stonecoal Wildlife Management Area.

Alcoholic beverages are prohibited within the boundaries of the West Virginia State Wildlife Center at French Creek.



DNR-Owned Or Leased Public Boating And Fishing Access Sites

Public boating and fishing access facilities shall be used solely for the purpose of launching and retrieving watercraft or fishing from shore. No other use of access sites is allowed.

  • Consumption of alcoholic beverages or possession of an open container of alcoholic beverages is prohibited.
  • Swimming or bathing, camping and open fires are prohibited.
  • Trash disposal is prohibited, except where trash receptacles are provided.
  • Discharge of firearms, fireworks and explosives is prohibited.
  • Leaving unattended watercraft is prohibited.
  • Commercial use of any public boating and fishing access site is prohibited, except as authorized by the Director.
  • Parking of any vehicle or the mooring of any watercraft in such a manner as to obstruct any avenue of ingress or egress, except for the purpose of launching is prohibited.
  • Any law enforcement officer acting under proper authority may prohibit an individual from launching a watercraft.
  • After launching, vehicles shall be parked in available parking spaces.

Any person violating any of these rules and regulations shall be punished in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 20 of the Code of West Virginia and such other laws as may be applicable. Wildlife management area boundaries are marked with blue paint and/or metal boundary signs.



National Wildlife Refugees

Rules and regulations governing hunting and fishing can be obtained from:

Ohio River Islands National Wildlife Refuge, P.O. Box 1811, Parkersburg, WV 26102; or call (304) 422-0752.
Canaan Valley National Wildlife Refuge, HC 70, Box 200, Davis, WV 26260; or call (304) 866-3858.  Web site www.fws.gov/canaanvalley/



Limited Areas

Area is limited in availability but may be used as access for other opportunities

  • Ned's Mountain (10 acres) Pendleton County.
  • Horse Creek (10 acres) Wyoming County.
  • B.J. Taylor (10 acres) Roane County.
  • O'Brien Lake (10 acres) Jackson County
  • Turkey Run (10 acres) Jackson County

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