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Major Hailstorms

The following are descriptions of all hailstorms shown on the map.


Edmonton-1901
Edmonton, Alberta; a hailstorm that produced 8-centimetre diameter hailstones caused extensive damage to tin roofs and lights.
Source: Environment Canada. The Climates of Canada. by D. Phillips, Supply and Services Canada Publishing Centre, Cat. No. EN56-1/1990E.
Okanagan Valley-1946
Okanagan Valley, British Columbia (near Penticton); a 15-minute hailstorm caused $2 million of damage to apple and pear crops.
Source: Environment Canada. The Climates of Canada. by D. Phillips, Supply and Services Canada Publishing Centre, Cat. No. EN56-1/1990E.
Central Alberta-1953
Central Alberta; thousands of birds were crushed by golf-ball sized hailstones as a hailstorm moved across central Alberta, affecting an area of 1800 square kilometres.
Source: Environment Canada. The Climates of Canada. by D. Phillips, Supply and Services Canada Publishing Centre, Cat. No. EN56-1/1990E.
Lambeth-1968
Lambeth, Ontario; a severe hailstorm caused extensive crop and property damage and left ice up to 17.5 centimetres deep on streets.
Source: Environment Canada. The Climates of Canada. by D. Phillips, Supply and Services Canada Publishing Centre, Cat. No. EN56-1/1990E.
Edmonton-1969
Edmonton, Alberta; large hailstones caused $17 million in damage to the city and surrounding area; $3 to 5 million in insured damages over an area of 30 square kilometres.
Source: Environment Canada. The Climates of Canada. by D. Phillips, Supply and Services Canada Publishing Centre, Cat. No. EN56-1/1990E.
Western Prairies-1971
Western Prairies; two days of severe weather caused $20 million damage over a 500-kilometre long path.
Source: Environment Canada. The Climates of Canada. by D. Phillips, Supply and Services Canada Publishing Centre, Cat. No. EN56-1/1990E.
Cedoux-1973
Cedoux, Saskatchewan; the largest documented hailstone in Canada was produced by this storm: 290 grams and 114 millimetres diameter; the storm caused an estimated $10 million in damage.
Source: Environment Canada. The Climates of Canada. by D. Phillips, Supply and Services Canada Publishing Centre, Cat. No. EN56-1/1990E.
Winnipeg-1978
Winnipeg, Manitoba; hail and heavy winds caused a total of $20 million in damage.
Source: International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction, Canadian National Report. Royal Society of Canada and Canadian Academy of Engineering, 1994.
Montréal-1979
Montréal, Quebec; a violent thunderstorm producing hail and heavy rains caused serious damage.
Source: Environment Canada. The Climates of Canada. by D. Phillips, Supply and Services Canada Publishing Centre, Cat. No. EN56-1/1990E.
Calgary-1981
Calgary, Alberta; a hailstorm hit Calgary on Tuesday, July 28, 1981; insured damage was estimated at $150 million over an area of 100 square kilometres.
Source: Charlton, R.B., B.M. Kachman, and L. Wojtiw. "Urban Hailstorms, A View from Alberta." Natural Hazards 12 (1995): 29 to 75.
Windsor-Leamington-1985
Windsor-Leamington, Ontario; $30 to 40 million in damage was caused by hail.
Source: Environment Canada. The Climates of Canada. by D. Phillips, Supply and Services Canada Publishing Centre, Cat. No. EN56-1/1990E.
Montréal-1986
Montréal, Quebec; $90 million in damage.
Source: International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction, Canadian National Report. Royal Society of Canada and the Canadian Academy of Engineering, 1994.
Montréal-1987
Montréal, Quebec; $125 million in damage.
Source: International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction, Canadian National Report. Royal Society of Canada and the Canadian Academy of Engineering, 1994.
Edmonton-1987
Edmonton, Alberta; widespread heavy rainfall from a powerful tornado hit Edmonton on Friday, July 31,1987; 300 millimetres of rain fell in 3 days; the Smoky, Wapiti, Simonette, and Kakwa Rivers rose up to 7 to 8 metres in some areas; hailstorms were reported during the tornado; the hailstorms caused $150 million in damages over an area of 270 square kilometres; none of the deaths (27 in total) during the tornado were attributed to hailstorms.
Source: Charlton, R.B., B.M. Kachman, and L. Wojtiw. "Urban Hailstorms, A View from Alberta." Natural Hazards 12 (1995): 29 to 75.
Edmonton-1988
Edmonton, Alberta; $48 million in damage.
Source: International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction, Canadian National Report. Royal Society of Canada and the Canadian Academy of Engineering, 1994.
Calgary-1988
Calgary, Alberta; $30 million in damage.
Source: International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction, Canadian National Report. Royal Society of Canada and the Canadian Academy of Engineering, 1994.
Calgary-1990
Calgary, Alberta; insured loss $16 million.
Source: Emergency Preparedness Canada, Canadian Geographic and National Atlas of Canada. Natural Hazards Poster Map, 1996.
Red Deer-1991
Red Deer, Alberta; a hailstorm hit Red Deer on Wednesday, July 3, 1991; insured loss was estimated at $50 million covering an area of 30 square kilometres.
Source: Charlton, R.B., B.M. Kachman, and L. Wojtiw. "Urban Hailstorms, A View from Alberta." Natural Hazards 12 (1995): 29 to 75.
Calgary-1991
Calgary, Alberta; Saturday, September 7, 1991 (Labour Day); over $400 million dollars in damage over an area covering 130 square kilometres.
Source: Charlton, R.B., B.M. Kachman, and L. Wojtiw. "Urban Hailstorms, A View from Alberta." Natural Hazards 12 (1995): 29 to 75.
Calgary-1992
Calgary, Alberta; losses were estimated at $22 million.
Source: Emergency Preparedness Canada, Canadian Geographic and National Atlas of Canada. Natural Hazards Poster Map, 1996.
Alberta-August 1992
Alberta; hail caused $5 million in damage.
Source: Press.
Alberta- September 1992
Alberta; hail caused $7 million in damage.
Source: Press.
Alberta-1993
Alberta; insured loss of $8 million.
Source: Emergency Preparedness Canada, Canadian Geographic and National Atlas of Canada. Natural Hazards Poster Map, 1996.
Prairie provinces-1994
Prairie provinces; several hailstorms result in insured losses of $200 million in crop damage.
Source: Emergency Preparedness Canada, Canadian Geographic and National Atlas of Canada. Natural Hazards Poster Map, 1996.
Salmon Arm-1994
Salmon Arm, British Columbia; insured loss of $15 million.
Source: Emergency Preparedness Canada, Canadian Geographic and National Atlas of Canada. Natural Hazards Poster Map, 1996.
Prairie provinces-1995
Prairie provinces; several hailstorms result in insured losses of $250 million, where $200 million was in crop damage insurance and $50 million was as a result of residence and vehicle damage.
Source: Emergency Preparedness Canada, Canadian Geographic and National Atlas of Canada. Natural Hazards Poster Map, 1996.
Calgary-1996
Calgary, Alberta; July 16; The hailstorm caused flooding; heavy rains and tornadoes were also reported. 911 service was knocked out, causing emergency crews to use regular lines. No injuries were reported. Many vehicles were damaged. Gale-force winds, and torrential rains swept across the area. There were no reported injuries, however extensive damage was done to homes and gardens.
Source: Insurance Bureau of Canada.
Winnipeg-1996
Hailstones the size of tennis balls pounded down on the city; crops were flattened south of Winnipeg, trees were stripped, gardens destroyed and windows shattered. Gale-force winds, torrential rains, funnel clouds and one tornado were reported. There were no reported injuries.
Source: Insurance Bureau of Canada.
Calgary-1996
Calgary, Alberta; July 24; insured cost reached $40 million.
Source: Insurance Bureau of Canada.
Calgary-1998
Two separate hailstorms occurred on July 4 to 5 and July 8. On July 4, 43.2 millimetres of rain also fell on Calgary. The July 8 storm included winds of up to 100 kilometres per hour, which tore apart greenhouse roofs. Hailstones ranging from pea to baseball size caused waist high flooding which forced many people to abandon their cars at intersections. Snowplows were brought out to clear the roads. Roads were destroyed by the hail, a warehouse collapsed and a store had to be closed because of a burst storm sewer. Mudslides forced boulders and mud across roads and railroads.
Source: Emergency Preparedness Canada.
 
Date modified: 2004-04-05 Top of Page Important Notices