Content
  Politics
  National News
 
Appearance
  Name
  Masthead
  General adjustments
Organization
  Editors
  Funding
Publication Process
  Printing
Conclusion
Bibliography

 

Introduction

The Daily Bruin is a renowned college newspaper. Most recently, it received the distinguished Pacemaker award from the Associated College Press in November of 2004. But despite its current reputation and the role it plays on campus today, what was the Daily Bruin like during the pivotal era of the 1960s? As the demeanor of the decade changed, how did the paper mold itself to compensate?

The history of the Daily Bruin is a very interesting topic, and the paper itself shows significant change, if not an evolution, throughout those ten fateful years. These changes, though noteworthy, vary in their placement in the paper: ranging from the changing scope of articles, to a change in aesthetics, to even change in the very foreground of the establishment and organization of the paper.

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Content

The content published in the Daily Bruin changed a great deal during the 1960s. Though many of these changes seem slight, they serve to reflect the decade.

 

Politics

The Daily Bruin's attitude towards politics and issues of national importance varied to a great extent over the course of the ten years.   The earlier years of the decade show a more different approach to national politics reflecting the nation's shared tension over the threat of communism.   Articles with titles such as "Red 'Master Plan' Cited" and those featuring opinions of the House Committee on Un-American Activities frequent the pages of the Daily Bruin throughout 1961 and 1962.

Articles addressing communism and the red threat were prominent among the Bruin of the early 60s.

Later years of the decade show more of a head-on approach to activism, civil rights, and the war in Vietnam: topics of great concern on a national and local scale during the late 1960s.   Articles focused on these prevalent issues, discussing student relation and the on campus effects of such topics.   Stories written entitled "Campus Moratorium: Two-day forum, antiwar films, folk festival to highlight events" and "Walk-out dramatizes Chicano-black relations" exemplify the types of articles that were featured in the Daily Bruin of the late 1960s.

The two different periods and several different papers on the side of the page help one to understand the growth that took place in the paper's outlook and purpose.   Life and the public became more concerned with bigger and different issues in the late 1960s than prior, and the paper addressed them.

 

National News

National news became further integrated in the paper during the 1960s, seemingly between the years 1962 and 1963.   The integration of national stories took place with the addition of articles published by the Associated Press (AP).   Most of the national news coverage though was written about indirectly focusing on its effects on campus.

The AP seen at the beginning of the article stands for Associated Press, which is a cooperative news organization, which many papers run stories from.

 

Social

The Daily Bruin seems to have taken two different approaches to the on campus social life in the early and late 1960s.

The early is exemplified by a more involved outlook, publishing a section entitled "UCLA Social: P.M. Report."   The section focuses on activities of the fraternities and sororities, announcing initiation activities, dances, formals, and even going to the detail to point out who each fraternity member has chosen to attend their event with.   This section in later issues (1961-62) became known as "Nightside."   It appeared every Friday and served to inform readers of the night's events.

The fact that such occasions are printed in a college newspaper lowers the professionalism of the paper from a current perspective and gives light to the outlook of the times.

A 1969 issue of the Daily Bruin shows a very different representation of campus social life.   It employs a more similar take compared to a modern day newspaper.   The paper has a section entitled "Campus," which details the activities of the week, mostly focusing on performances and club meetings.   Fraternal and sorority activities are strikingly absent from this section.

According to John Sandbrook who served on the Daily Bruin from 68' to 73' and eventually became Sports Editor, the Daily Bruin's attitude towards fraternities took a turn towards a more objective standpoint in the later 60s.

Sandbrook acted as a member of the Daily Bruin for roughly five years.

"Phi Kappa Psi had an annual spring party one year called 'Viva Zapata.'
 Hanging over the front door was a banner that indicated that Hispanics were not welcome.   The Daily Bruin took a photo of it, ran the story, and the incident became a major campus controversy for two weeks during the middle of student government elections.  Ultimately, Phi Kappa Psi fraternity was suspended from campus activities for one year and many fraternity students felt that the Daily Bruin's reporting exaggerated the incident," said Sandbrook.

I feel this distinct change represents many differences between the 1961 and 1969 paper: a change in staff, a change in title, a change in graphics, but most importantly, a change in scope and point of view.   The two papers vary because of this and because of the events that were taking place in and around the UCLA campus.

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Appearance

The Daily Bruin's appearance undertook a considerable makeover during the 1960s, led chiefly by the alteration of the masthead.   Other variations did occur though in the sections and graphics printed, as well as the overall length of the paper.

 

Name

Though the name, the Daily Bruin, was well established by the 60s, the Bruin did not always hold the name.   The paper was founded in the fall of 1919, the same year as the school, as the Cub Californian and was published weekly.   In March of 1924, it was changed to the California Grizzly as the mascot changed from the cub to the Grizzly.   Finally, one year later in October of 1925, it received an almost final name: the California Daily Bruin.   The California was eventually dropped from the name, and it remains today as, of course, The Daily Bruin.

 

Masthead

The masthead was changed, and it transformed the front page of the paper from what seemed to be 50s style to a more modern graphic representative of the decade.

The diagram shows the change of masthead that took place in the 1960s stemming downward from old to new. The final masthead is of the current Daily Bruin (2005).

 

General Adjustments

Beyond the masthead, individual graphics that headed sections as well as cartoons in the Daily Bruin changed.

An important modification that was made within the Daily Bruin was the length of the paper.   In 1961 and 1962, the paper's length seems to vary between 8 and about 13 pages. In 1969 however, the paper is on average longer, at about 20 pages; one issue even extends to roughly 30 pages.   This change seems to be representative of the evolution of the paper and its grasp of larger, more controversial issues in the late 60s.

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Organization
Editors

The appointment of editors and organization of the Bruin changed early in the 1960s.   Until 1964, the students voted on who should be editor-in-chief of the Daily Bruin, upon which time an organization known as the ASUCLA Communications board was founded to oversee all student publications and media on campus.   The group, founded on July 1 st, 1964, consisted of 12 total members: six undergraduates composed of the editor-in-chief of the Daily Bruin, the President of the Undergraduate Association, four others who were appointed, and the remaining six were three members from the Graduate Student Association, one faculty member, one representative of the Administration, and a manger of publications of the Associated Students.   The board had the power to choose the editors for the Daily Bruin, Southern Campus (the yearbook), and two other publications, Satyr and Westwind.

 

Funding

The communications board also held control over the financial resources and publication policies of the Bruin.    The board approved the budget and most of the money came from student fees and from advertising in the paper itself.   The budget was very tight since advertising revenue was not as prevalent then as it is now and a subsidy from student registration fees was required. John Sandbrook shared that he, "...probably received a 20 dollars a month stipend from the board, perhaps the equivalent of $120 per month in today's dollars," said Sandbrook.

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Publication Process
Printing

The Daily Bruin was printed in the offset printing style that was characteristic of the time.   Offset printing involves the spreading of ink onto a metal plate with the etched images, then that plate being pressed onto a surface such as a rubber blanket.   Following that, the rubber blanket now imprinted with images is applied to sheets of paper.

"We would drive down to the printing press in Glendale at 1 am every night.   The paper would be printed there and completed by 7 to 8 am in the morning," said Sandbrook.

Roughly 20,000 to 23,000 copies of the Daily Bruin were printed in Sandbrook's time on staff.

In an interview with Mr. Sandbrook, he also shared an interesting story that involved the UCLA/USC rivalry and the printing of the Daily Bruin.

"We had heard that USC was going to try to tamper with the printing of the Bruin, so myself and another from the Daily Bruin accompanied a police officer over to the printing press.   We found the 'SC pranksters there, and of course, they left after seeing the police unit," said Sandbrook.

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Conclusion

The Daily Bruin has a rich history in the 1960s.   That history is filled with challenges, good journalism, but mostly notably change.   The paper underwent many of these changes in part with the rest of society and with the decade.   Civil rights and the war in Vietnam for example became of paramount importance in society and the paper accurately molded the scope of their coverage to fit that.   Overall, the Daily Bruin is an skilled newspaper that has since set landmarks in the field of college journalism.

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Bibliography

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By Darius Filsuf, 2005