The following will be appearing as panelists and performers at Brown’s E-fest 2006. Extended biographies appear via links at the right.

Aya Karpinska is a graduate of the influential Interactive Telecommunications Program at New York University. Her research and creative work focus on the impact of technology on artistic practice, in particular computer-mediated literature and music.
Site: http://www.technekai.com
 
Braxton Soderman is a second year Ph.D. candidate in the Modern Culture and Media Department at Brown University. He completed a MFA in Writing at the California Institute of the Arts where he participated in the Integrated Media Program.
Site: http://www.thefollowingphrases.com
 
Brian Kim Stefans is an MFA candidate in Electronic Writing at Brown University. He runs the site arras.net, devoted to new media poetry and poetics, and his work appears on turbulence.org, ubu.com, rhizome.org and elsewhere.
Site: http://www.arras.net
 
Daniel C. Howe is a digital artist, researcher & doctoral candidate at NYU’s Media Research Lab. His interests include generative systems for artistic practice & social aspects of technology design. He is the 2005 recipient of the Brown Fellowship for Electronic Writing.
Site: http://mrl.nyu.edu/~dhowe
 
Edrex Fontanilla earned his undergrad degree in the digital arts and is an alumus of the MEME@Brown program.  He teaches interactive sculpture and video art at Brown’s Visual Art Department, and digital imaging and net.art/web design at the Community College of Rhode Island.
Site: http://www.edrex.com
 
Gale Nelson is author of ceteris paribus and stare decisis.
 
George P. Landow is Professor of English and Art History, Brown University. His books on hypertext and digital culture include Hypermedia and Literary Studies (MIT, 1991), and The Digital Word: Text-Based Computing in the Humanities (MIT, 1993) both of which he edited with Paul Delany, and Hypertext: The Convergence of Contemporary Critical Theory and Technology (Hopkins UP, 1992).
Site: http://www.landow.com
 
Ilya Kreymer is an undergraduate majoring in Computer Science at Brown University.
 
Jim Carpenter is currently a lecturer in computer programming and systems design in the Department of Operations and Information Management at The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania.
 
Judd Morrissey received his MFA from Brown University. His work in electronic literature has been internationally received and has also been reviewed by the New York Times and The New Republic. “My Name Is Captain, Captain,” a collaboration with Lori Talley was published by Eastgate Systems in 2002. He teaches in the Art and Technology department at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and freelances in the field of artificial intelligence and natural language processing.
Site: http://www.thejewsdaughter.com
 
Lutz Hamel teaches at the University of Rhode Island.  His major research interests are computational logic, machine learning, evolutionary computation, data mining, bioinformatics and computational structures in art and literature.

Michael Stewart is a first year MFA student in fiction at Brown University.
 
Michael Magee is the author of a critical study, Emancipating Pragmatism: Emerson, Jazz and Experimental Writing, as well as four books of poems, including My Angie Dickinson (Zasterle, 2006). He directs the Institute for Poetic Arts and Critical Theory at Rhode Island School of Design as well as the non-profit literary organization Combo Arts.
Site: http://www.comboarts.org
 
Nick Montfort is the author of Twisty Little Passages: An Approach to Interactive Fiction (MIT Press, 2003) and editor with Noah Wardrip-Fruin of The New Media Reader (MIT Press, 2003). He is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Pennsylvania. His dissertation research is in interactive fiction, narratology, and computational linguistics.
Site: http://nickm.com
 
Nick Musurca is an undergraduate majoring in Computer Science at Brown University. He is also a filmmaker.
 
Noah Wardrip-Fruin is a digital media writer, artist, and scholar. His writing/art has been presented by galleries, arts festivals, scientific conferences, DVD magazines, VR Caves, and the Whitney and Guggenheim museums. He has recently edited three books including First Person: New Media as Story, Performance, and Game (MIT Press, 2004, with Pat Harrigan).
Site: http://grandtextauto.gatech.edu
 
Polly Hall is a graduate student in music and electronic media at Brown University. She holds a Bachelor of Arts from Amherst College (English, multimedia literature and composition, 2004).
Site: http://pollyhall.com
 
Robert Coover is widely regarded as one of America’s most influential living writers, author of some fifteen groundbreaking books of fiction, most recently The Adventures of Lucky Pierre: Directors’ Cut. Coover has for more than a decade been teaching experimental courses in hypertext and multimedia narrative at Brown University.
 
Robert Kendall has been creating interactive multimedia poetry since 1990, making him one of the earliest practitioners of the form. He is the author of a book-length hypertext poem, A Life Set for Two (Eastgate Systems, 1996).
Site: http://www.wordcircuits.com/kendall
 
Scott Rettberg writes electronic literature and is an assistant professor of new media studies in the literature program at Richard Stockton College of New Jersey. His works include the Avery label novel Implementation, created with Nick Montfort.
Site: http://www.retts.net
 
Stuart Moulthrop is Professor of Information Arts and Technologies at the University of Baltimore, where he directs the B.S. program in Applied Information Technology and teaches in the Bachelor of Technical or Professional Studies in Simulation and Digital Entertainment. His hypertext fiction Victory Garden (Eastgate Systems, 1991) has earned a place in Robert Coover’s “golden age” of electronic writing. His later projects are ”Hegirascope,” 1995; “The Color of Television,” 1996; “Reagan Library,” 1999; and “Pax,” 2003.
Site: http://www.retts.net
 
Wendy Chun is an assistant professor of modern culture and media at Brown University. She combines her background in systems-design engineering and critical theory to analyze the cultural, political, and technical implications of and possibilities for high-speed digital networks.
Site: http://www.brown.edu/Departments/MCM/people/chun