FEMINAE ROMANAE:
The Women of Ancient Rome
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FEMINAE ROMANAE:
The Women of Ancient Rome

"Venus has kept her promises: let her tell the story of my happiness, in case some woman will be said not to have had her share." Sulpicia, Six Poems, trans. Lee Pearcy. Courtesy of Diotima.

 In all of Roman literature surviving the fall of its Empire, only six short poems from a woman named Sulpicia have come down to us that speak in a woman's authentic voice. Yet more has been learned of Roman women in the past thirty years than in centuries before. From the Empress to her freedwoman, the good wife to the prostitute, the midwife to the scholar, this site presents an introduction to the history of the women of ancient Rome.

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Site founded on 9/30/01. Site updated and resited 7/15/06

Featured at Diotima

Further information on the ancient world may be found at the author's sites,
Julius Caesar: The Last Dictator
Princeps: The Life of Caesar Augustus and
Undying Glory: the Pursuit of Alexander

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Image from the House of the Mysteries, Pompeii, Courtesy of Johnson Co. Community College, Pompeii Site.

Suzanne Cross 2001-2006. All Rights Reserved.
No material may be used without the author's permission.