Egypt Encompassed
Published: November 23, 2005
Page: 12
Western Luxor

On the west bank of the Nile River at Luxor there is a wealth of funerary monuments. The most famous of which is the Valley of the Kings. Its fame is due in part to the discovery of King Tut's tomb by Howard Carter in 1922. The tombs in the Valley of the Kings are incredible. They contain the best preserved Egyptian painting, some feature false doors and pits to cause grave robbers to fall to their doom. The tombs are well worth visiting, but sadly photography is forbidden. So I have no images of the tombs to share. An amusing way to reach the valley, and the one that we used, was to ride donkeys.

Valley of the Kings
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Regal Cemetery
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Tomb of Refuse
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Hatshepsut from Above
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Our group hiked over the eastern ridge of the Valley of the Kings. We encountered an enormous amount of litter left by the guards who patrol the area and then descended the ridge alongside the burial temple of Queen Hatshepsut. Hatshepsut reigned is thought to have reigned from 1503 BC to 1482 BC. Due to rampant sexism her statues frequently feature a beard because of ancient Egyptian difficulty with accepting a female ruler. Near Hatshepsut's temple we rendezvoused with our donkeys again and rode them back to the Nile through the agricultural area that lays between the monuments and the river.
Temple of Queen Hatshepsut
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Farmer's Donkey
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Nile Irrigation
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