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The full results of the top 100 Greatest Albums Ever (as declared by Irish musicians) is found in the current issue of Hot Press - and each day we'll reveal a little more of the list on hotpress.com.

Take a look below to see how the list is shaping up, and keep checking back to find out how it progresses!

We're also looking to see what YOU think are the best albums of all time - cast your vote here!

Greatest Albums Ever The Beatles
Revolver
(1/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Parlophone)
Review Pic

19 Apr 2006

Regarded by many as The Beatles’ finest work, and coming a mere eight months after the superb Rubber Soul, their seventh album Revolver was light years further on in terms of musical innovation, paving the way for the acid- and meditation-fuelled psychedelia to come, and pioneering lyrical invention that thrashed the conventions of the pop song. It saw the band and producer George Martin use studio technology to take pop music into new, unheralded realms far beyond the live capability of any band of the era.

‘Tomorrow Never Knows’ was arguably the strangest recording in pop to date, its lyrics inspired by the Tibetan Book of The Dead and allied to a startling drum pattern, (which, 30 years later, provided the template for the Chemical Bros' 'Setting Son'), fulfilling John Lennon’s desire for a backing track emulating a troop of chattering monks and his own unworldly voice fed through a Leslie speaker. ‘Yellow Submarine’ blends fantasy lyrics with an infuriatingly catchy tune. George Harrison’s ‘Taxman’, whose riff was later purloined by The Jam, is an acerbic look at the UK political scene, while his ‘Love You Too’ is a further exploration by him into Eastern music. Paul McCartney’s ‘Eleanor Rigby’ tells a startling tale of loneliness and despair set to a baroque string arrangement.

Although we didn’t realise it at the time, within a month of Revolver’s release the Beatles gave their last ever live concert, and in more ways than one, there was no going back.

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Greatest Albums Ever Radiohead
Ok Computer
(2/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Parlophone)
Review Pic

19 Apr 2006

They’d upped the stakes with The Bends, but for the follow up Radiohead redefined themselves as a classic art-school band whose singer seemed haunted by the future shock visions of grand old dystopians like Orwell, Burgess and Bradbury.

Their third album jerked and spasmed into life with ‘Airbag’, the musical transposition of one of JG Ballard’s waking auto-erotic nightmares enacted on an eight-lane motorway in the ninth circle of a grey suburban hell. “In the next world war/In a jacknifed juggernaut/I am born again” Thom Yorke keened, like a disorientated ghost looking down on his crash test dummy self. It got even grimmer thereafter, although you’d never know it by melodies. ‘Subterranean Homesick Alien’ was an ET Phone Home SOS set to glistening guitar arpeggios. ‘Exit Music’ was a monochrome wartime tale of lovers’ fleeing totalitarian forces, capped with the whispered kicker: “We hope that you choke”. ‘Paranoid Android’ veered crazily from punk to prog to Greek chorus over its bizarre six minute duration. ‘Karma Police’ was bitter gallows humour set to Beatles balladry. ‘Let Down’ and ‘No Surprises’ competed with each other for the title of saddest song known to mankind. And to cap it all, the survivor’s syndrome hymn of ‘Lucky’ and a cast adrift astronaut spacewalk called ‘The Tourist’.

This was the record that had Brad Pitt comparing them to Beckett. Modern life never seemed so terrifying, nor sounded so good.

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Greatest Albums Ever Bob Dylan
Blood On The Tracks
(3/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(CBS)
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19 Apr 2006

Responding to a radio interviewer claiming to have “enjoyed” Blood On The Tracks, Dylan rebuffed her by wondering how anybody could enjoy that kind of pain. For this graphically personal and confessional album is reputed to be about the agonising and acrimonious break-up of Dylan’s marriage to Sara Lowndes, and it sees him alternately at his most vicious and his most vulnerable.

The viciousness in ‘Idiot Wind’ has Dylan spewing out phrases like, “Idiot wind, blowing every time you move your teeth” and “I can’t even touch the books you’ve read”. ‘Simple Twist Of Fate’ is a deeply tragic song, brimming with a forlorn sense of regret, while ‘If You See Her, Say Hello’ and ‘You’re Gonna Make Me Lonesome When You Go’ combine that melancholy with a hint of optimism. The epic abstract expressionist grandeur of ‘Tangled Up In Blue’ has been compared to Proust, and the sixteen-verse ‘Lily, Rosemary And The Jack Of Hearts’ is filmic in its narrative quality. Elsewhere 'Shelter From The Storm' displayed Dylan's mastery of almost Biblical narrative balladry ("Twas in another lifetime/One of toil and blood/Where blackness was a virtue/The road was full of mud"). Dylan’s belief in the potential of these songs led him to scrap an earlier version of the album and re-record most of it, but the initial critical response was mixed, with Nick Kent, writing in NME, famously declaring “I don’t honestly know what good Dylan is any more.” Fortunately, others did.

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Greatest Albums Ever Pink Floyd
Dark Side Of The Moon
(4/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Harvest)
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19 Apr 2006

Dark Side Of The Moon became the inevitable breakthrough Pink Floyd had been heading towards for some time, but none could have predicted either its runaway commercial success or its claim to a permanent place in the pantheon of great rock albums of all time.

Its doom-laden sound textures were captivating vehicles for such un-pop subjects as schizophrenia, religion, paranoia and alienation, and collectively the tracks portrayed a bleakness so relentless as to be virtually devoid of optimism. Casual muttered murmurings on various tracks merely added troubling hints of lunacy that reflected the times that spawned it – and were doubtlessly informed by former member Syd Barrett's acid-agitated slide into mental illness.

Societal imbalances of the era were at the heart of ‘Us And Them’, while ‘Brain Damage’ needed little explanation as to its subject matter. Religion got a good kicking too, in ‘The Great Gig In The Sky’, featuring a remarkable wordless gospel aria from Clare Torry.

So, by some bizarre twist of fate, one of the most depressing and non-commercial albums in rock history became a multimillion seller. The equally surprising success of the hit single ‘Money’ only added to the album’s impact and by 1980 it had become the longest-running chart album ever in the USA.

So if you ever meet somebody nostalgic for the early 70s, ask the men in white coats to play them this.

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Greatest Albums Ever The Beatles
Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band
(5/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Parlophone)
Review Pic

19 Apr 2006

Although their previous studio album Revolver is now the more acclaimed, Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band is arguably The Beatles' most famous work and the one that had most influence on the music and society of its time. It had no track breaks, a message in the run-off groove and was developed loosely from Paul McCartney’s concept of an album by a fictitious band. The lyrics were printed on a lavish gatefold sleeve, with its famous front cover by Peter Blake, reflecting the tenor of the time and opening doors of both perception and excess.

Having retired from touring, the band was free to use the recording studio to the ultimate, with no time or financial restrictions and limited only by their own creativity. From the suite-like ‘A Day In The Life’, with that long thunderous chord coaxed from a bewildered orchestra, to the alleged-and-denied drug references in ‘Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds’, the beautiful ‘She’s Leaving Home’, the sentimentality of ‘When I’m Sixty Four’ and George Harrison’s mystical wig-out ‘Within You Without You’, it sparked argument and amazement in equal measures.

Originally the album was to include ‘Penny Lane’ and ‘Strawberry Fields Forever’, but that didn’t stop it becoming a benchmark, the term “their Sgt Pepper” later applied across the board to any band’s supreme lifetime achievement.

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Greatest Albums Ever Radiohead
The Bends
(6/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Parlophone)
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19 Apr 2006

In 1994 Radiohead were unliked and unlikely Oxford outcasts (Radiohead? Crazyhead? Birdland?) who’d scored a flukey hit stateside with ‘Creep’. A year later they were the indie nerd’s answer to Oasis as the best band to come out of the UK since The Smiths.

Suffering American tour burnout and smarting from the knowledge that they were capable of far better than the respectable but patchy debut Pablo Honey, the quintet knuckled down to craft a stellar set of songs characterised by a wired, tired and jet-lagged atmosphere that managed to sound simultaneously jaded and inspired.

The opening ‘Planet Telex’ was a shimmering multi-layered concerto for voice and guitar. ‘My Iron Lung’ was a masterclass in how to vary dynamics, drama and volume. Plus, the record in its entirety acted as a showcase for Jonny Greenwood, whose solos were as melodic as they were painstakingly planned, the rock ‘n’ roll embodiment of Flaubert’s dictum that a man should be ordered and regular in his life that he be wild and unpredictable in his work.

But of course it was Thom’s moral panics and communication breakdowns that dominated the lyrical department. ‘The Bends’, ‘High & Dry’ and ‘Fake Plastic Trees’ all sounded, notwithstanding the stunning tunes, like the last words of a man suffering passion fatigue. Then there were the moments where the band seemed to drift out of their collective body and play above their own capabilities: the gorgeous ‘Black Star’ and the ghostly nocturne of the closing ‘Street Spirit’.

OK Computer was more ambitious, but this one had all the best tunes.

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Greatest Albums Ever Van Morrison
Astral Weeks
(7/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Warner)
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19 Apr 2006

Despite the passing of time, Van Morrison’s album has lost none of its elusive mysticism, its lyrics open to as many interpretations as there are listeners. Magically merging elements of folk, jazz, blues and rock, using mainly acoustic instruments, it was recorded over two evenings. Van was at his most viscerally instinctive, encased, both physically and metaphorically, in a glass studio booth, barely in touch with the other, mainly jazz, musicians and yet producing, often improvising, a work of eternal intrigue.

‘Cypress Avenue’ reflects on lost innocence, and the often under-rated ‘Slim Slow Slider’ is a graphic depiction of heroin, while the majestic ‘Madame George’ continues to excite and baffle, with a line thought to be a reference to drag queens later described by Van as referring to a game of dominoes!

The separation of the two vinyl sides under the subheadings “In The Beginning” and “Afterwards” compounds the mystery while losing none of the magic. Evocative images in phrases such as “the diamond-studded highway” and symbolic references like “the barefoot virgin child” saw Morrison labelled as a poet. Despite bearing eternal truths from that hinterland beyond words, the album was given a lukewarm reception, only gaining in stature over the years, until in 2003 it was voted the best Irish album ever by a panel of musicians.

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Greatest Albums Ever Nirvana
Nevermind
(8/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Geffen)
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19 Apr 2006

The first time producer Butch Vig heard Nirvana play ‘Smells Like Teen Spirit’ in a loud rehearsal room in a low-rent suburb of LA where the band had convened for pre-production sessions for their second album, he found himself furiously pacing the floor, possessed by the overwhelming urge to record this bastard child of The Pixies, ‘Louie Louie’ and Boston’s ‘More Than A Feeling’ before the buzz subsided.

Within a couple of months, it and another dozen-odd tracks were in the can, and Michael Jackson’s days at the summit of the Billboard charts were numbered. Tunes such as ‘Come As You Are’, ‘Lithium’, ‘In Bloom’ and ‘Breed’ were a blistering combination of Grohl and Novoselic’s brutally precise rhythm backing, hardcore fundamentalist punk guitar noise, Beatles double-tracked vocal melodies, jock metal muscle and dramatic quiet/loud Pixies dynamics, all topped off with laconic underdog lyrics, and of course Kurt Cobain’s voice, hushed and dripping with sarcasm one minute, a bloodcurdling howl the next.

But the band also showed range way beyond their peers: ‘Polly’ and ‘Something In The Way’ were muted and ghostly bits of twisted acoustic folk-art that sounded as if they’d been rescued from the murkiest recesses of the Harry Smith Anthology.

Nevermind.

The bollocks.

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Greatest Albums Ever The Beatles
The White Album
(9/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Apple)
Review Pic

19 Apr 2006

By the time this 30-track double-album came to pass, internal relationships in the band were faltering, so most of the songs were individual compositions, never mind the credits. Among its faults were its length, as most reckoned it would have made a superb single album without the inconsequentiality of tracks like ‘Wild Honey Pie’ and ‘Why Don’t We Do It In The Road’ or the marginally interesting eight minutes of ‘Revolution 9’.

But Lennon was at his most reflective on ‘Dear Prudence’, and in ‘Sexy Sadie’ he laid into the Maharishi, while McCartney’s ‘Back In The USSR’ was a fine take-off of the Beach Boys. The slow version of ‘Revolution’ was grittier than the single version, and songs like ‘Happiness Is A Warm Gun’, ‘I’m So Tired’, 'Blackbird’, ‘Julia’ and Harrison’s ‘While My Guitar Gently Weeps’ showed they could still deliver on the song front and then some. And lest we forget, a little tune by the name of ‘Helter Skelter’ happened to catch the ear of a struggling singer-songwriter by the name of Charles Manson.

In many respects, The White Album remains a brave and adventurous effort.

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Greatest Albums Ever The Beach Boys
Pet Sounds
(10/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Capitol)
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19 Apr 2006

Having stopped touring with the band two years previously, head Boy Brian Wilson set about creating what could really be his solo masterpiece, provoked by The Beatles’ most recent works to go beyond the formulaic limitations of your average pop song.

Singing live to orchestral backing tracks and using Tony Asher as his lyrical sidekick, he created some of the most imaginative pop gems of all time. Even the instrumental ‘Let’s Go Away For Awhile’ has an arrangement rarely bettered by Wilson, and the choral section of ‘You Still Believe In Me’ is truly stunning. ‘Wouldn’t It Be Nice’ and ‘God Only Knows’ became mega hit singles, as did the traditional folk song ‘Sloop John B’.

Yet the album was severely dumped on by US critics more taken by the band’s previous obsessions with surfing, cars and girls, their negativity doing little to assuage Wilson’s creeping paranoia as hinted at in ‘I Just Wasn’t Made For These Times’. Ahead lay the magnificence of ‘Good Vibrations’ and the madness of the legendary Smile sessions, but their seeds had already been sown by this album of sheer quality and unrepressed joy. Ironically, given the Beatles’ inspiration, Paul McCartney later admitted that without Pet Sounds there would have been no Sgt Pepper.

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Greatest Albums Ever U2
The Joshua Tree
(11/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Island)
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18 Apr 2006

1987’s Joshua Tree was the album that saw U2 consummate their love affair with America. After the European noir of The Unforgettable Fire, their fifth album saw the band embracing the wide open spaces of the States, while Bono’s political bent saw him addressing subjects like Africa (‘Where The Streets Have No Name’), American foreign policy in Central America (‘Bullet The Blue Sky’) and the heroin epidemic in Ballymun (‘Running To Standstill’).

The frontman also proved himself capable of writing the first of many classic love songs that have survived through the years (‘With Or Without You’). Arguably the finest rock album of the 1980s, The Joshua Tree really is the sound of a band at the peak of their powers and assured the Dublin quartet of their place in the pantheon of truly great rock bands.

Every song stands up as a cracker, from the opening strains of ‘Streets...’ right through to the closing refrain of ‘Mothers Of The Disappeared’, The Joshua Tree is quite simply one of the best rock records ever created.

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Greatest Albums Ever Joni Mitchell
Blue
(12/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Reprise)
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18 Apr 2006

One of the hurdles faced by new female singer-songwriters is the inevitable comparison with Canadian singer-songstrel Joni Mitchell, with this landmark album seen as the primary testing ground. It followed on the success of her second opus Ladies Of The Canyon and the single ‘Big Yellow Taxi’. Mitchell was clearly expanding beyond her original folk-based stylings to create an album that contained such 24-carat nuggets as ‘My Old Man’, the oft-covered ‘Carey’, the exuberant ‘A Case Of You’ and the elegiac ‘The Last Time I Saw Richard’. Indeed, many songs revealed her penchant for weaving multiple subjects into one song, with ‘All I Want’ juxtaposing a spirited yearning with the pessimistic view that such yearnings are mere dream substitutes for unfound love. ‘This Flight Tonight’ even survived an insensitive cover by Nazareth. Blue was an uncompromising work by an artist refusing to be penned in the folk stockade.

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Greatest Albums Ever The Sex Pistols
Never Mind The Bollocks
(13/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Virgin)
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18 Apr 2006

A new year zero, cultural revolution, coup d’etat and night of the long knives all rolled into one. The Pistols' one and only album (let’s forget The Great Rock ‘N’ Roll Swindle shall we?) arrived at a point when the band had gone through two record labels and already announced themselves to the middlebrows as the first bona fide folk devils the UK had seen since The Stones did their Alex and The Droogs routine in ‘65.

The sound of the record was phenomenal, Bill Price perfectly capturing Cook and Matlock’s muscle and Steve Jones’ bastardised hard rock rhythm guitar, somewhere between Ronson, Townshend and Asheton. And of course, over this infernal racket, a mongrel London-Irish Richard The Turd by the name of John Lydon mangled his vowels and spat consonants like he was waging war on language itself.

‘Anarchy In The UK’ was a powerhouse act of desecration, as if Hazel Motes, the self-styled founder of the Church Without God from Flannery O'Connor's Wise Blood, had been reincarnated as the snot-nosed incubus brat of Alice Cooper and Iggy Stooge. Elsewhere ‘God Save The Queen’ was an amped-up Republican rebel song wearing bondage and bovver boots instead of a beard and a beergut.

Two thirds of the album bristled with the same unholy attack, and if there was a little trashy padding, well, it didn’t matter. ‘Pretty Vacant’ was McLaren’s appropriation of Richard Hell’s Blank Generation manifesto. ‘Holidays In The Sun’ a reckless black comedy too high on the thrill of its own transgression to care about the dangers of messing with Nazi paraphernalia, while ‘EMI’ was an insolent two-fingered salute to their former employers.

It was a far cry from Avril Lavigne.

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Greatest Albums Ever The Stone Roses
The Stone Roses
(14/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Silvertone)
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18 Apr 2006

Few records are brass-necked enough to proclaim their genius from the very beginning. But then, few records are so audaciously beautiful as The Stone Roses.

The album opens with one of the greatest riffs ever composed – the slow, majestic chug of 'I Wanna Be Adored'. Gloriously self-aggrandising, this is the sound of The Stone Roses declaring their youthful invincibility. For a debut, The Stone Roses is at once remarkably cohesive and delightfully multi-faceted. If anyone claims to have encountered a song to trump the sunny three-chord shuffle of 'She Bangs The Drums', frankly, they’re having you on.

But The Stone Roses has its deeper moments too. On 'Made Of Stone', the Roses posit the new genre of karmic indie. 'I Am The Resurrection', meanwhile, possesses the reach, scale and thumping arrogance of a biblical epic.

For The Stone Roses' 49-minute duration, the Roses are the greatest band to have ever walked the planet.

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Greatest Albums Ever The Clash
London Calling
(15/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(CBS)
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18 Apr 2006

An album so monumental Rolling Stone named it their best of the 1980s, even though it was released in ’79, London Calling's breathtaking spread of styles functioned not only as punk’s riposte to Exile On Main Street and The White Album, but an index of classic Americana as seen from a grim and beleagured Blighty.

Over 18 tunes, The Clash reversed their ‘I’m So Bored With The USA’ diktat and mined American history, myth and pop art, invoking Elvis, Montgomery Clift and the badman gangsta archetype Stagger Lee. At this point, the four piece were brimming with so much confidence there didn’t seem to be anything they couldn’t play, be it bluebeat (‘Wrong ‘Em Boyo’), raffish rockabilly (‘Brand New Cadillac’), Spector-esque walls of sound (‘The Card Cheat’), white soul (‘Train In Vain’), agit-prop (‘Working For The Clampdown’), doomy urban dub (‘Guns Of Brixton’) and knockabout poolroom rock (‘Jimmy Jazz’).

In anybody’s book, this double set was an embarassment of riches. The band were on the kind of roll comparable to Dylan’s mid-60s triptych and the Stones’ golden age (’68-’72). It didn’t hurt that Strummer, Simenon and Jones looked like matinee idols, establishing an iconographic gang chic used as a template by rock ‘n’ roll romantics for the next 25 years.

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Greatest Albums Ever Jeff Buckley
Grace
(16/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Columbia)
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18 Apr 2006

Not only did Buckley inherit his father Tim’s fascination with French chanteuse, he also possessed far more than a working knowledge of Van, Nina Simone, Nusrat, Delta blues, Memphis soul, Bulgarian sacred chant and This Mortal Coil. He was that rare thing, a fine writer who took the art of interpretive singing deadly seriously. On that level, ‘Lilac Wine’ mated the Simone template with Edith Piaf and John Paul Jones’ mellotron strings from ‘Rain Song’. Few can hear him sing, “I drink much more than I oughta drink/Because it brings me back you” and remain unmoved.

By the same token, his reading of Benjamin Britten’s ‘Corpus Christi Carol’ was a shimmering and shocking boy soprano recital, while his ‘Hallelujah’ is the definitive interpretation of El Cohen’s scripture, perfectly pitched between lust and liturgy. As for his own ‘Last Goodbye’, this tune will evermore be heard in the context of Buckley’s premature death by drowning in the Mississippi river at age 27.

Grace is sacred music.

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Greatest Albums Ever Kate Bush
Hounds Of Love
(17/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(EMI)
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18 Apr 2006

In ‘The Ninth Wave’, the dreamy second side of the original vinyl release of Hounds Of Love, Kate Bush borrows a title from Tennyson, only to spin out an entirely unrelated macabre folk tale of a woman lost at sea.

It might well be a metaphor for her entire career, a feminising alchemy within the all boy tree-house of rock. The first album made in her 48-track home studio is a remarkable piece of theatre, combining intricate vocal layers over such exotic instrumentation as the didgeridoo and the balalaika, while more commercial stylings on Hounds Of Love side one make for great hooks and good business (‘Running Up That Hill’ would break America). But mostly this is girl stuff documenting darksome emotional fears (“I’ve always been a coward/And never know what’s good for me”), the sinister intensity of maternal feeling (‘Mother Stands To Comfort’) and everything in between. Even the ‘only a dream?’ denouement plays like an original.

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Greatest Albums Ever The Smiths
The Queen Is Dead
(18/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Rough Trade)
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18 Apr 2006

The Smiths' masterpiece was hatched in circumstances of unbearable pressure. The band were at their critical and commercial peak; after a run of classic singles, culminating in 1985’s 'The Boy With The Thorn In His Side', fans expected something astonishing.

Never before or since did Marr’s music and Morrisey’s vocals blend so seamelessly – The Queen Is Dead permits itself moments of melodrama yet never forgets that, above all, it's supposed to be a pop album. In addition to such Smiths' milestones as 'There Is A Light That Never Goes Out' and 'Big Mouth Strikes Again', there is space for humour ('Frankly My Shankly') and camp anguish ('I Know It’s Over').

Like great literature, here was a record that engaged the intellect and nurtured the soul.

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Greatest Albums Ever Bob Dylan
Blonde On Blonde
(19/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(CBS)
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18 Apr 2006

Hallelujah. “Tell it, Bob”, cry the session conscripts on ‘Rainy Day Women #12 & 35’, as the travelling spiritual rattles into town. 'The Hammond' testifies on ‘One Of Us Must Know (Sooner Or Later)’. Salvation awaits at the Blonde On Blonde revival tent. Dylan’s raucously entertaining melodrama swaggers and swoons between costumed surrealism (‘Stuck Inside Of Mobile With The Memphis Blues Again’), poppy field interludes and pot shots at John Lennon, but mostly he’s preaching about love.

Enraptured by muse and earlier covenant woman Sara, the final scene (‘Sad-eyed Lady Of The Lowlands’) is a bended knee declaration. But in the quasi-religious ecstasy of his state, there remains a fear of false idols and impossible ideals (‘Louise, she’s alright, she’s just near’).

That incredible Blonde sound, the one Dylan later described as “wild mercury, metallic and bright gold, with whatever that conjures up” is a leap of faith. Whatever 'faith' means. Magnificent.

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Greatest Albums Ever The Beatles
Abbey Road
(20/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Apple)
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13 Apr 2006

Officially the Beatles’ recorded swansong, Abbey Road reflected the growing rift between McCartney and Lennon, proving that the Beatles as a collaborative unit were over. Ironically, it made for some of the most beautiful and harmonically accomplished music of the band’s career.

Side one was the most varied: Lennon re-asserted his rock ‘n’ roll credentials with the gritty ‘Come Together’, and George Harrison finally came into his own as a songwriter with two of the album’s highlights, the soulful ballad ‘Something’ (Frank Sinatra’s all-time favourite song) and the hopeful folk tune ‘Here Comes The Sun’. Even Ringo Starr got a piece of the action with the whimsical nursery-rhyme tale of ‘Octopus’ Garden’

But McCartney’s influence loomed larger than any of the other three, and he dominates on tracks like ‘You Never Give Me Your Money’ and the extended suite that is side two of the original LP, which introduced characters such as the ‘Sun King’, ‘Mean Mr Mustard’ and ‘Polythene Pam’. The evocative, melodic ‘Golden Slumbers’ sets up the glorious finale, ‘Carry That Weight’ neatly sums up the Beatles' career in a burst of call-and-response guitar solos before wrapping up on the fittingly titled ‘The End’ ( a “hidden” final track ‘Her Majesty’ was tacked on) . The iconic cover shot of the four Beatles walking across the road, away from the studio that gave the album its title, said it all.

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Greatest Albums Ever U2
Achtung Baby
(21/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Island)
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13 Apr 2006

When U2 announced they had to go away and dream it all up again on New Year’s Eve 1989 in The Point, this is what they meant. Creatively blocked and miserable, the band floundered away for weeks. Months went by without producing much usable material. Then, as the band were struggling to come up with a middle-eight for ‘Ultra Violet’, Edge stumbled on the signature figure for ‘One’. Rejuvenated, the band soldiered on.

The finished album’s overall atmosphere was murky, ambivalent, and not a little evil, particularly in the subterranean club hell scenarios of ‘Until The End Of The World’ and ‘The Fly’.

Some of the record’s darker moments – ‘One’, the Roy Orbison/Scott Walker/Jacques Brel-isms of ‘So Cruel' and ‘Love Is Blindness' – were undoubtedly written in the shadow of the break-up of The Edge’s marriage, but Achtung Baby seemed to have a revitalising impact on the band, giving them a fresh impetus and a renewed zeal to remain the biggest rock band on the planet.

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Greatest Albums Ever The Velvet Underground
The Velvet Underground...And Nico
(22/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Verve)
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13 Apr 2006

Sleaze, needles, leather and neon – these are a few of Lou Reed’s favourite things. This album foreshadowed Scorsese’s Taxi Driver by a decade – Reid wanders the squalid lane-ways of the Bowery, chronicling the filth, the debauchery, the sense of freedom and possibility.

Musically, The Velvet Underground… matches his vision, with its squall of police-siren licks and funereal bass riffs. And in co-vocalist Nico, a soul already nearly lost, Reed found his perfect foil. Like Reed, Nico had long danced a dangerous tango with heroin. Unlike him, she would descend into tragic junkiedom. You can hear echoes of what she will become on this LP. It is a slow-burn suicide note from someone who does not yet realise they wish to destroy themselves.

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Greatest Albums Ever Fleetwood Mac
Rumours
(23/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Warners)
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13 Apr 2006

Drummer Mick Fleetwood compared Rumours to “a soap opera”, no doubt alluding to the bewildering array of relationships enjoyed by the band members, and also confessed that every track was about someone in the band. But among all the loving and loathing, the interpersonal friction and the faction fighting, there’s an album of superbly crafted songs, including McVie’s ‘You Make Loving Fun’ and ‘Don’t Stop’, Nicks’ ‘Dreams’ and Buckingham’s ‘Go Your Own Way’.

Rumours worked, both commercially and artistically, because the mature rock audience of the time, especially in the USA, craved a more sophisticated sound than they’d grown up with. The album steadfastly remains a sober collection of undeniable pop-rock classics.

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Greatest Albums Ever The Band
The Band
(24/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Capitol)
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13 Apr 2006

While most of their contemporaries were focusing on the future, The Band turned even further towards history and tradition for the album that followed their pioneering debut Music From Big Pink. With others lost in psychedelia, The Band adopted the simplest name and were depicted in the cover’s black and white shot as throwbacks to pioneering days.

Lyrical subjects ranged from the raw ruralism of ‘Up On Cripple Creek’ to the American Civil War in ‘The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down’, with Robbie Robertson emerging as a sensitive songwriter and guitar-player of depth and aplomb. With this album, rock music started getting real again.

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Greatest Albums Ever The Rolling Stones
Exile On Main Street
(25/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Rolling Stones)
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13 Apr 2006

The overall air of heat, decadence and general malaise that pervades this double album can best be summed up by a stray line from ‘Tumbling Dice’: “There’s fever in the funkhouse now”. This was the Stones as raw and as defiant as you’d want them to be, amid glorious brass augmentation, with Gram Parsons a spectral but significant presence at the sessions, influencing its country blues leanings, particularly the slovenly swing of ‘Sweet Virginia' and ‘Sweet Black Angel’.

Muically, Charlie and Keef were firing on all cylinders, as is obvious on the vampirical ‘Rocks Off’, ‘Hip Shake’, the syncopated lurch of ‘Lovin’ Cup’ and a murderous take on Robert Johnson’s ‘Stop Breakin’ Down’. The album is decidedly downbeat, the band obviously suffering troughs of in-house bickering and drug psychosis, while producing work that is the very antithesis of the term easy listening. But check out the maudlin gospel of ‘Let It Loose’ and ‘Shine A Light’ and marvel that a band in such a state could produce such lasting magnificence.

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Greatest Albums Ever Thin Lizzy
Live And Dangerous
(26/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Vertigo)
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13 Apr 2006

Philip Lynott was never more alive than when he was rockin’ out on stage with his musical mates, and on this double-album, recorded at Hammersmith Odeon in London, you get him and the boys at their most rampantly triumphant.

Lynott’s vocal performance, especially on the emotive ‘Still In Love With You’, is positively mesmerising. Matters would rarely be as good again for Thin Lizzy, but Live And Dangerous is permanent proof that for a couple of glorious nights in London, they were just what it says on the tin.

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Greatest Albums Ever Metallica
Master Of Puppets
(27/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Elektra)
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13 Apr 2006

With Master of Puppets, Metallica pushed their taste for the epic to the ultimate with what is their finest moment, that once-in-a-career phase when all members of a band seem to peak at the same time. It was their last album before the tragic death of bassist Cliff Burton, and also the album on which James Hetfield came into his true voice, as on ‘Battery’. With layers of grinding guitars creating a truly dark, sinister sound, Kirk Hammet peeled off riff after limitless riff.

Master Of Puppets proved that Metallica were one of the most important metal bands of all time.

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Greatest Albums Ever Neil Young
Harvest
(28/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Reprise)
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13 Apr 2006

With the split of Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young following the live Four Way Street album in 1971, Neil Young was free to make a commercial-sounding album. This platinum blockbuster contained the number one hit ‘Heart Of Gold’ which sat neatly alongside such other fragile classics as 'Old Man', 'The Needle And The Damage Done' and 'Out Of The Weekend'.

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Greatest Albums Ever Tom Waits
Closing Time
(29/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Asylum)
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13 Apr 2006

This immaculate 1973 debut remains, for casual fans, his most complete (and by far most accessible) album: Waits doled out his stories of love, regret and heartbreak like those emotions had just been discovered for the first time.

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Greatest Albums Ever The Beatles
Rubber Soul
(30/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Apple)
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13 Apr 2006

The first Fab Four record to be written and recorded under the influence of marijuana. The weed certainly worked wonders, as for many it’s their greatest, most enduring collection of songs.

Great upbeat pop tunes of the calibre of ‘Baby You Can Drive My Car’ and ‘You Won’t See Me’ contrast with much more folk-influenced compositions like the Dylanish ‘Norwegian Wood’. The poignant ‘In My Life’ saw them reflecting on past friends and lovers with breathtaking songwriting skill, while ‘Nowhere Man’ was a supreme song of dislocation.

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Greatest Albums Ever Nirvana
In Utero
(31/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Geffen)
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13 Apr 2006

A freakishly beautiful suicide note from the distempered fancies of Kurt Cobain. Nirvana have never been more furious than ‘Scentless Apprentice’, more melancholic than ‘All Apologies’ or rawer than ‘Frances Farmer Will Have Her Revenge On Seattle’. He’ll come back as fire, to burn all the liars except…

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Greatest Albums Ever My Bloody Valentine
Loveless
(32/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Creation)
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13 Apr 2006

After three years, 18 engineers and £250,000, Kevin Shields emerged from behind the sandbags with an alchemist’s elixir that went no wave, new wave, everywhere and nowhere.

The freeform wilfulness of those ornate tuning missteps, submerged vocals, spidery drum-machines and looped back bass lines coalesced into a shadowy force that just kept on coming.

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Greatest Albums Ever Guns n Roses
Appetite for Destruction
(33/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Geffen)
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13 Apr 2006

In 1991, Guns N' Roses, lip-curled graduates of Sunset Strip’s hair-rock scene, released one of heavy rock’s defining records. Spilling over with gloriously dumb riffola and classic choruses, Appetite was as much a litmus test as an LP: if this didn’t rock your bollocks off, you were clinically deceased.

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Greatest Albums Ever The Pixies
Doolittle
(34/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(4AD)
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13 Apr 2006

The Pixies' sound was always special – the aural equivalent of being punched in the face by a beautiful, shrieking alien woman dressed like a prostitute – and Doolittle was probably the tightest, sharpest take on it.

The opening salvo of ‘Debaser’, ‘Tame’ and ‘Wave Of Mutilation’ is one of the most astonishing in rock history, a thrilling volley of chaotic noise – Frank Black’s bonkers wordplay matched by the twisted beauty of Joey Santiago’s guitar playing. The sweet surf-pop of ‘Here Comes Your Man’, and haunting ballad ‘Monkey Gone To Heaven’ also showcased a softer side to the Pixies, making this their most complete work.

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Greatest Albums Ever David Bowie
Hunky Dory
(35/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(RCA)
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12 Apr 2006

Hunky Dory is the album on which a pre-stardom Bowie spreads his wings as a songwriter – honest, brittle and very beautiful. The record’s opening sweep, from ‘Changes’ to ‘Life On Mars’, is among the most stunning in rock history; these songs have a heart-on-sleeve directness that would not be encountered again in his work.

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Greatest Albums Ever Bob Dylan
Highway 61 Revisited
(36/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(CBS)
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12 Apr 2006

The road that snaked from New Orleans through Duluth and on to the Canadian border was already mythological terrain. Elvis Presley grew up in a housing project on the Memphis stretch and Robert Johnson had conducted his most famous transaction there. Dylan would recreate Highway 61 in his own image, a spooky fairground of lost souls, freaks and Americana where Ezra Pound and T.S. Eliot rumble and John The Baptist tortures at the behest of the Commander-in-Chief. A monumental record.

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Greatest Albums Ever The Pixies
Surfer Rosa
(37/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(4AD)
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12 Apr 2006

Shouting and snarling about corpses, unbirthday host Frank Black sounded like a nutter on a street corner with a knack for associative wordplay (check out the extraordinary verbal dexterity of ‘Brick Is Red’). Kim Deal, then posing as Mrs. John Murphy, pounded close by, before freaking out the guests with primal scene anthem 'Gigantic', a childhood tale pervy enough to recall the films of Brian De Palma.

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Greatest Albums Ever Led Zeppelin
Led Zeppelin IV
(38/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Atlantic)
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12 Apr 2006

Zep’s usual trademarks are here in force – Plant’s magnificently melancholic wail, Page’s mammoth guitar riffs, and that ferociously muscular rhythm section. Indeed, ‘Black Dog’ and ‘Misty Mountain Hop’ were among the most primal rockers the band had yet recorded, but there was a darkness and complexity at their core, which kept fans coming back for repeat listens.

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Greatest Albums Ever Bell X1
Music In Mouth
(39/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Universal)
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12 Apr 2006

BellX1’s second album saw them take flight as one of Ireland’s most unique and important rock bands.

Lyrically and musically, Music In Mouth was a revelation. Multi-instrumentalists Dave Geraghty, Brian Crosby and Dominic Phillips wove a beguiling sonic tapestry, over which frontman Paul Noonan came into his own as a stunning lyricist and vocalist, creating universal epics out of extremely personal emotions, while ensuring there was enough wry humour in the mix to keep it out of po-faced territory.

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Greatest Albums Ever John Martyn
Solid Air
(40/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Island)

12 Apr 2006

Martyn, a Scottish-born folk singer-songwriter, had been absorbing more and more disparate influences as his career had progressed. A lot of blues, rock and jazz touches had begun to appear in his sound, and this sense of musical adventure reached its peak on Solid Air.

The end result was an album of powerful, frequently weightless beauty – occasionally verging on anger, but never losing its gentler, sensitive side. Recorded during a period in which Martyn was struggling with alcoholism, this is a deceptively dark, slow-burning classic.

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Greatest Albums Ever Marvin Gaye
What's Goin' On
(41/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Tamla Motown)
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12 Apr 2006

Leaving aside its laudable political agenda, this is an album of unabashed musical excitement – stylish, inventive, and richly melodic – featuring one of the truly great soul voices at the peak of his powers. Gaye abandoned the more radio-friendly lyrical themes he'd perfected on prior releases, to deliver a concept album documenting the poverty, decay and violence he witnessed in America at the time.

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Greatest Albums Ever Stevie Wonder
Songs In The Key Of Life
(42/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Tamla Motown)
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12 Apr 2006

Songs… was the pinnacle of Stevie Wonder’s creativity – dizzyingly ambitious, yet always underpinned with the essence of his highly melodic songcraft. Few albums can maintain consistency over 21 tracks, but this record proves to be an exception – from 'Love's In Need Of Love Today' through 'Knocks Me Off My Feet' to 'Isn't She Lovely', one terrific song follows another, in what is agenuine tour-de-force

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Greatest Albums Ever AC/DC
Back In Black
(43/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Atlantic)
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12 Apr 2006

Released just five months after the death of vocalist Bon Scott, Back In Black went on to become one of the most celebrated hard rock albums of all time.

This is music stripped of all frills and pretensions – so simple in its construction and bloody-minded in its intent that it would make The Ramones sound prog. It’s a collection of devastatingly catchy riffs and choruses, from the brutal power of opener ‘Hell's Bells’, right through to the blisteringly anthemic closer ‘Rock And Roll Ain't Noise Pollution’. A positively electrifying listening experience.

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Greatest Albums Ever Alice In Chains
Dirt
(44/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Columbia)
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12 Apr 2006

Recorded at the height of Layne Staley's heroin addiction, Dirt proved that Alice In Chains had a lot more depth than most acts ploughing the grunge furrow at the time. It’s a deeply sad, strange record, which creates a far eerier ambience than the likes of Pearl Jam could ever hope to achieve.

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Greatest Albums Ever Arcade Fire
Funeral
(45/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Rough Trade)
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12 Apr 2006

For those tired of watching sweaty three-chord garage-rockers dominate the indie scene, the Arcade Fire’s mixture of brains and eccentricity was a blessing from heaven. It seemed inconceivable a few years back that a nine-piece orchestral-pop outfit from Canada could become more relevant than The Strokes, but Funeral’s devastating blend of songcraft and sonic ambition made it all possible.

A remarkable success story, as unexpected as it was deserved.

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Greatest Albums Ever Bjork
Debut
(46/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(One Little Indian)
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12 Apr 2006

Bjork proved with this dazzling effort that she possessed the talent and personality to go it alone. Hard to understand how tracks as innovative and edgy as 'Violently Happy', 'Big Time Sensuality' and 'Human Behaviour' made such a mainstream splash, but her rich, gorgeous vocals may well have been the key.

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Greatest Albums Ever Radiohead
Kid A
(47/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Parlophone)
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12 Apr 2006

Greeted with some puzzlement on release, Kid A’s stock has accumulated steadily in the years that followed. Warp-flavoured doodles like the title track and ‘Treefingers’ felt disappointingly slight at first, but revealed more hidden charms with every listen. My, has it grown.

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Greatest Albums Ever Tom Waits
Swordfishtrombones
(48/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Island)
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12 Apr 2006

Swordfishtrombones is a sonically dazzling album, but the most compelling aspect of it is, as ever, Tom Waits’ extraordinary voice. It’s an incredible instrument, full of howl and rasp, yet with enough sensitivity to carry the album's quieter moments.

The heartfelt ballad ‘Johnsburg, Illinois’ is a polished diamond, buried among the delicious junkyard arrangements elsewhere. There are few artists as singular as Waits, and Swordfishtrombones finds him as gloriously uncompromising as ever.

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Greatest Albums Ever Van Morrison
Moondance
(49/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Warners)
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12 Apr 2006

Not quite as celebrated as its predecessor Astral Weeks, Moondance has gone on to achieve classic status regardless.

A greater commercial success than the album it followed, it showcases the lighter, more melodic side to Morrison’s songwriting talent. Moondance may lack Astral Weeks’ intensity, which might also explain why it doesn’t attract quite the same level of fan worship, but it is still brimming with moments of brilliance. The title track has an easy, graceful shuffle that few can match, proving that the old curmudgeon always possessed a romantic side.

Opener ‘And It Stoned Me’ is another breathtaking number – an exultant brass blast, with a wonderfully infectious chorus refrain. It may only be second best in the Morrison catalogue, but that could scarcely be employed as a criticism, given the competition.

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Greatest Albums Ever David Bowie
The Rise And Fall Of Ziggy Stardust
(50/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(RCA)
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11 Apr 2006

Ziggy Stardust found David Bowie at his glammest and most accessible. Based on a loose concept about the career of alien rock star Ziggy, the album merges fantasy and reality, to the point where it becomes difficult to tell whether Bowie is being autobiographical.

Regardless, it contains some of the very best songs its creator would ever commit to disc – not least the gorgeously unfolding opener ‘Five Years’ and the heart-swellingly epic ballad ‘Starman’.

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Greatest Albums Ever Joy Division
Closer
(51/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Factory)
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11 Apr 2006

Post-industrial Manchester provided a fittingly bleak setting for a regional aftershock and punk’s death rattle. You can hear Ian Curtis' world collapsing – the epilepsy, the drugs, the bizarre love triangle – in every stentorian plea.

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Greatest Albums Ever Talking Heads
Remain In Light
(52/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Sire)
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11 Apr 2006

Produced and co-written by Brian Eno, the New Yorkers’ fourth album found them replacing the angular rhythms of yore with a fuller, funkier sound that brought the Studio 54 crowd on board. Leading the way was ‘Once In A Lifetime’, a glorious howl of adult disaffection.

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Greatest Albums Ever Bob Dylan
The Freewheelin'
(53/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(CBS)
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11 Apr 2006

Though it would be a while before the purist folk fascists lost patience, Freewheelin’ (Dylan’s second) already hinted at his move away from political commentary towards soul-searching introspection.

Of course, ‘Blowin’ In The Wind’, ‘Hard Rain’s Gonna Fall’ and ‘Masters Of War’ became instant protest anthems – but the real revelations were elsewhere. The windswept ‘Girl From The North Country’ (subsequently the subject of a duet between Dylan and Johnny Cash), ‘Corrina, Corrina’ and ‘Don’t Think Twice It’s All Right’, established him conclusively as the most defiantly romantic songwriter yet to stalk the earth. And this was just the starter course.

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Greatest Albums Ever Michael Jackson
Thriller
(54/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Epic)
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11 Apr 2006

His reputation as a human being may have been tarnished somewhat, but the commercial and musical monster that was Thriller insures that his status as an artist can never be questioned.

Ignore the schmaltzy Paul McCartney duet ‘The Girl Is Mine’, and concentrate on the string of irresistibly danceable hits that made Jacko the biggest star on planet earth.

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Greatest Albums Ever Pink Floyd
Wish You Were Here
(55/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Harvest)
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11 Apr 2006

Though it never sold in the same colossal proportions as Dark Side Of The Moon, Floyd’s follow-up was a warmer and more directly emotional collection. Spookily, ex-bandmate and acid casualty Syd Barrett turned up at the studio mid-recording, obese, shaven-headed and catatonic.

His ghostly presence haunts every note of the two tunes directly penned about him, ‘Shine On You Crazy Diamond’ and the maudlin yet ultra-moving ‘Wish You Were Here’. The latter is now frequently played at premature funerals.

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Greatest Albums Ever Weezer
Pinkerton
(56/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Geffen)
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11 Apr 2006

Not as popular with casual fans as the band’s two self-titled records, but Pinkerton seems to be the Weezer album that played the biggest part in building the group’s fervent following.

Rivers Cuomo’s gift for metal-flavoured power-pop gems remained intact, but the band's cute, geek-y demeanour was noticeably played down.

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Review Pic Miles Davis
Kind Of Blue
(57/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Fontana)

11 Apr 2006

Kind Of Blue was the sound of an album whose time had come, an expression of musical genius that has influenced subsequent generations since it was recorded in 1959, but which could have been made yesterday.

From the opening bars of ‘So What’, Miles Davis takes the listener on a complete musical journey, through a series of improvisations based around simple melody lines, that is as accessible for the novice as for the professional.

Its strength lies in its serenity and its simplicity. Kind Of Blue is the definitive jazz album. It is living musical history and a true American masterpiece.

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Greatest Albums Ever PJ Harvey
Stories From The City, Stories From The Sea
(58/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(RCA)
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11 Apr 2006

Stories From The City… saw Polly Harvey abandoning her tendency towards bruising electronica and post-rock atmospherics, in favour of rich melodies and fat classic rock riffs.

Two particular tracks took the breath away – the heart-rendingly melancholic Thom Yorke duet ‘This Mess We're In’, and the furious quasi-metal rush of ‘Kamikaze’. Her best work, at a time when we least expected it.

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Greatest Albums Ever Red Hot Chili Peppers
Blood Sugar Sex Magik
(59/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Warner Bros)
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11 Apr 2006

The Chili Peppers’punk-funk-rock was at its most potent on Blood Sugar Sex Magik. Benefiting hugely from the more focussed Rick Rubin production, it veered away from the technically-impressive but ultimately self-indulgent style that had hampered their earlier recordings. Where once the band were overbearingly macho, they now seemed to have come to terms with their inadequacies, both as musicians and as people. While ‘Give It Away’ and ‘Suck My Kiss’ are among the leanest, funkiest things the ‘Peppers recorded, it was the core of sensitive balladry that made the album a classic – from the tender heartbroken swoon of ‘Breaking The Girl’, to the woozy drug-induced melancholy of the still-fabulous ‘Under The Bridge’. The sound of a band hitting their stride, both commercially and creatively.

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Greatest Albums Ever Antony & The Johnsons
I Am A Bird Now
(60/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Rough Trade)
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11 Apr 2006

Lou Reed, Devendra Banhart, Boy George and Rufus Wainwright all lend a hand as the English-born, New York-domiciled singer conjures up a work of deeply melancholic beauty.

The thing that stands out most – apart from the confessional quality of the songwriting – is Antony's remarkable voice, which is a masculine growl one moment, and shrill opera singer the next. An astonishing record. CD

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Greatest Albums Ever Bruce Springsteen
Nebraska
(61/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Columbia)
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11 Apr 2006

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Greatest Albums Ever DJ Shadow
Entroducing
(62/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Mo' Wax)
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11 Apr 2006

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Greatest Albums Ever Leonard Cohen
Essential Leonard Cohen
(63/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Sony)
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11 Apr 2006

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Greatest Albums Ever Nick Drake
Five Leaves Left
(64/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Island)

11 Apr 2006

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Greatest Albums Ever Rory Gallagher
Irish Tour '74
(65/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Polydor)
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10 Apr 2006

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Greatest Albums Ever Television
Marquee Moon
(66/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Elektra)

10 Apr 2006

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Greatest Albums Ever The Pogues
Rum, Sodomy, & The Lash
(67/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Stiff)
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10 Apr 2006

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Greatest Albums Ever Elliott Smith
X/O
(68/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Dreamworks)
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10 Apr 2006

100 Greatest Albums Ever

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Greatest Albums Ever Neil Young
After The Goldrush
(69/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Reprise)
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10 Apr 2006

100 Greatest Albums Ever

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Greatest Albums Ever Tom Waits
Rain Dogs
(70/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Island)
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10 Apr 2006

100 Greatest Albums Ever

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Greatest Albums Ever Bob Dylan
Bringing It All Back
(71/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Columbia)
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10 Apr 2006

100 Greatest Albums Ever

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Greatest Albums Ever Bruce Springsteen
Born To Run
(72/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Columbia)
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10 Apr 2006

100 Greatest Albums Ever

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Greatest Albums Ever Husker Du
Zen Arcade
(73/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(SST Records)
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10 Apr 2006

100 Greatest Albums Ever

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Greatest Albums Ever Johnny Cash
Man In Black
(74/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Sony)
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10 Apr 2006

100 Greatest Albums Ever

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Greatest Albums Ever Led Zeppelin
Led Zeppelin 1
(75/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Atlantic)
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10 Apr 2006

100 Greatest Albums Ever

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Greatest Albums Ever Pearl Jam
Ten
(76/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Epic)
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10 Apr 2006

100 Greatest Albums Ever

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Greatest Albums Ever Smashing Pumpkins
Siamese Dreams
(77/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Virgin)
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10 Apr 2006

100 Greatest Albums Ever

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Greatest Albums Ever Super Furry Animals
Radiator
(78/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Creation)
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10 Apr 2006

100 Greatest Albums Ever

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Greatest Albums Ever Coldplay
Parachutes
(79/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Parlophone)
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10 Apr 2006

100 Greatest Albums Ever

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Greatest Albums Ever The Flaming Lips
Soft Bulletin
(80/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Warner Bros)
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10 Apr 2006

100 Greatest Albums Ever

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Greatest Albums Ever Neil Young
On The Beach
(81/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Reprise)
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10 Apr 2006

100 Greatest Albums Ever

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Greatest Albums Ever Nick Cave
The Boatman's Call
(82/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Mute)
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10 Apr 2006

100 Greatest Albums Ever

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Greatest Albums Ever The Smiths
Meat Is Murder
(83/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Rough Trade)
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10 Apr 2006

100 Greatest Albums Ever

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Greatest Albums Ever Van Morrison
It's Too Late To Stop Now
(84/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Warner Bros)
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10 Apr 2006

100 Greatest Albums Ever

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Greatest Albums Ever The Rolling Stones
Stickey Fingers
(85/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Rolling Stones)
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07 Apr 2006

100 Greatest Albums Ever

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Greatest Albums Ever Bob Marley
Legend
(86/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Island)

07 Apr 2006

100 Greatest Albums Ever

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Greatest Albums Ever Nick Cave
Abattor Blues/Lyre Of Orpheus
(87/100 Greatest Albums)
(Mute)
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07 Apr 2006

100 Greatest Albums Ever

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Greatest Albums Ever The Presidents Of The United States of America
Presidents Of The United States
(88/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Columbia)
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07 Apr 2006

100 Greatest Albums Ever

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Greatest Albums Ever Rory Gallagher
Deuce
(89/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Polydor)
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07 Apr 2006

100 Greatest Albums Ever

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Greatest Albums Ever Roxy Music
Roxy Music
(90/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Roxy Music)
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07 Apr 2006

100 Greatest Albums Ever

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Greatest Albums Ever Sheryl Crow
Tuesday Night Music Club
(91/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(A&M; Records)
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07 Apr 2006

100 Greatest Albums Ever

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Greatest Albums Ever Stevie Wonder
Innervisions
(92/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Tamla)
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07 Apr 2006

100 Greatest Albums Ever

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Greatest Albums Ever Yo La Tengo
And Then Nothing Turned Itself Out
(93/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Matador)

07 Apr 2006

100 Greatest Albums Ever

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Greatest Albums Ever Bjork
Post
(94/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(One Little Indian)
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07 Apr 2006

100 Greatest Albums Ever

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Greatest Albums Ever Lucinda Williams
Lucinda Williams
(95/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Polygram)
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07 Apr 2006

100 Greatest Albums Ever

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Greatest Albums Ever Nina Simone
Nina Simone & Piano
(96/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(RCA Victor)
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07 Apr 2006

100 Greatest Albums Ever

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Greatest Albums Ever Planxty
Planxty
(97/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Polydor)
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07 Apr 2006

100 Greatest Albums Ever

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Greatest Albums Ever Rory Gallagher
Live In Europe
(98/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Polydor)
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07 Apr 2006

100 Greatest Albums Ever

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Greatest Albums Ever The Kinks
Village Green Preservation Society
(99/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(PYE)
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07 Apr 2006

100 Greatest Albums Ever

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Greatest Albums Ever Jimi Hendrix Experience
Electric Ladyland
(100/100 Greatest Albums Ever)
(Track Records)
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07 Apr 2006

100 Greatest Albums Ever

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