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1999 Rugby World Cup

Venues
Country Stadium Seating Town Summation
WALES














ENGLAND




















FRANCE






 













IRELAND

























SCOTLAND














Millennium Stadium



Racecourse Ground






Stradey Park



Twickenham






McAlpine Stadium

Ashton Gate




Welford Road






Stade de France






 
Stade Felix Bollaert




Stadium Municipal

Parc Lescure


Stade de la Mediterranee


Lansdowne Road









Ravenhill Road








Thomond Park






Murrayfield






Hampden Park




Netherdale


72,000



15,000






13,500



75,000






24,000

22,000




16,800






80,000






 
42,000




37,000

35,000


20,000


49,250









20,000








13,500






67,500






53,000




8,000


Cardiff



Wrexham






Llanelli



London






Huddersfield

Bristol




Leicester






St. Denis






 
Lens




Toulouse

Bordeaux


Bezier


Dublin









Belfast








Limerick






Edinburgh






Glasgow




Galashiels


Built on the site of the Cardiff Arms Park.
The stadium was built especially for the
World Cup. It has Britain's only
retractable-roof stadium.
The stadium, which is the home ground
of second-division Wrexham has been
updated in the last few years, yet retains
much of its Old World charm. The Turf
Hotel, which was used as a dressing room
100 years ago, now serves refreshments
to fans.
One of the city's finest hours came in
1972 when Llanelli defeated a visiting
All Black team.

Twickenham is a name that conjures up
images of history, over the last 10 years
it was entirely rebuilt, but as seems to
often be the case, as old stands disappear
piece-by-piece, so to has the atmosphere.
A traditional highlight are the pre-match
"picnics" in the surrounding carparks.
This is a space-age, award-winning
designed stadium in Yorkshire.
Home of the second-division club
Bristol City, this stadium has already sold
out the match between New Zealand
and Tonga -- something the soccer club
can only dream of.
Recent renovations have increased the
capacity crowd at this stadium in central
England, which is home to one of
England's best-supported rugby clubs.
The original clubhouse built 90 years ago
is still used.

The biggest stadium in use in the World
Cup, the Stade de France was built as
the crown jewel when France hosted the
1998 soccer World Cup. Although it
succeeded the Parc des Princes as the
national stadium, and has double the
seats, it has yet to capture the atmosphere
of the old ground.
Although the city has no rugby history,
the stadium will host a quarterfinal.
The stadium is similar to those found
in Britain and is rectangular in shape
with the crowd close to the field of play.
This stadium was also renovated for the
1998 soccer World Cup.
Built for the 1938 soccer World Cup and
renovated last year, this stadium is
protected as a national monument.
France opens its World Cup campaign
in this 10-year-old stadium.

The Irish capital has become a popular
destination for sports fans due in large
part to its carnival-type atmosphere.
Lansdowne is the home of international
Irish soccer and rugby. This may be the
last the "concrete bowl" sees of a rugby
World Cup as the Irish government has
plans to build a new national stadium. It
is one of the few major stadiums left
where fans can still stand on terracing.
Ravenhill is the home of Ulster, the
European champions. The pitch was
accidentally destroyed in winter when
weed killer was applied to the surface.
The fans are very close to the action,
which can be an intimidating factor.
Only one side of the ground is covered
and there is talk that temporary seating
may be used.
The IRFU spent 3.1 million Irish pounds
on the floodlights, terracing, toilets,
medical facilities and putting down a new
pitch in the stadium.
An additional 3,000 temporary seats have
been added.

The stadium was rebuilt six years ago,
but lost much of its atmosphere then,
not least of which was the loss of the
view of the Pentland Hills.
Traditionally many fans make the 3
kilometer walk to the stadium, which adds
to the air of comraderie.
This is the home of Scottish international
soccer. It has received a multimillion
dollar facelift, which transformed the
former old-fashioned stadium into a
state-of-the-art facility.
This is the smallest stadium in use in
the World Cup and is reminiscent of old
school grounds in Edinburgh.



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