NATIONAL ORDERS & AWARDS


2002 National Orders Awards

ORDER OF THE BAOBAB / ORDER OF THE COMPANIONS OF O.R. TAMBO / ORDER OF MAPUNGUBWE

Order of the Baobab

BRONZE

· Elizabeth Abrahams
· Thelma Henderson
· Eva Mokoka
· Clara Basenjeng Masinga
· Adelle Searll (1944 - 1998)

SILVER

· Hamilton Mvumelwano Dandala
· Ian Haggie (1917 - 2002)
· Noria Mabasa
· Yvonne Muthien
· Stuart Saunders

GOLD

· Arthur Chaskalson
· Marinus Daling (1948 - 2002)
· Tamsanqa Kambule
· Moses Mabhida (1923 - 1986)
· Ismail Mahomed (1930 - 2000)
· Sam Motsuenyane
· Friedel Sellschop (1930 - 2002)
· Mark Shope (1918 - 1998)
· Adelaide Tambo

Order of the Companions of O.R. Tambo

· Mahatma Gandhi (1869 - 1948)
· Kenneth David Kaunda
· Olof Palme (1927 - 1986)

Order of Mapungubwe

BRONZE

· Peter Beighton
· Hamilton Naki

GOLD

· Allan M. Cormack (1924 - 1998)
· Frederik Willem de Klerk
· Basil Schonland (1896 - 1972)

PLATINUM

· Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela

 

ORDER OF THE COUNSELLOR OF THE BAOBAB IN BRONZE

FOR OUTSTANDING CONTRIBUTION TO THE STRUGGLE AGAINST APARTHEID AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE LABOUR MOVEMENT PARTICULARLY AMONG FARM WORKERS [top]

Liz Abrahams, a hero of the working people, is another example of South African resilience.
A factory worker at age 14, Abrahams could easily have been one of those sad statistics on the exploitation of women and farm workers in the many factories and plantations of this country – but she refused.

Instead she chose to dedicate her life to changing the fate of her fellow workers by being part of a dedicated struggle that eventually led to this new democracy.

Abrahams became the secretary of the now legendary Food and Canning Worker’s Union in 1956. The occupation of this post happened at a time when leaders of the trade-union movement were severely harassed with bannings and sometimes imprisonment. In fact, when Ray Alexander and Frank Marquard were banned and forced out of the Union, it was Liz Abrahams who ably took the leadership of the Union, complementing the work of these great trade unionists.

And when her harassment and detentions commenced in the eighties Abrahams did not falter in her resolve to continue fighting for a just, democratic, non-racial and non-sexist South Africa. When democracy finally delivered a new Parliament in 1994, Abrahams took her position among the leaders of the new nation.

The grand old lady retired from the National Assembly in 2000 but continues to champion the cause of farm workers.

FOR EXCEPTIONAL CONTRIBUTION TO SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT [top]

Grahamstown is privileged to have the spirit of a person such as Thelma Henderson.

In 1975, she founded the Centre for Social Development in Grahamstown attached to Rhodes University and raised funds to sustain it, on her own.

Thelma Henderson has, over the years, established some 40 schools on surrounding farms and raised over R6 million for township educational projects.

She raises in excess of R2,5 million annually to finance the dozens of other community facilities that she has established to ease the plight of the poor.

These include projects such as a school for mentally handicapped children, two service centres for the aged, the Grahamstown Mental Health Society, home-care groups, clinics and hospital visits, a rural outreach programme, a pre-school training programme which has trained young women from all over the Eastern Cape and an Adult Education Course in Basic Bookkeeping and Computer Literacy.

Henderson has received a number of awards for her work. These include the Solus Medal for Meritorious Service to the Community and the South African Teachers’ Association Centennial Award for Outstanding Contribution to Education.

FOR EXCEPTIONAL CONTRIBUTION TO COMMUNITY UPLIFTMENT IN THE FIELDS OF HEALTH AND WELFARE [top]

The very embodiment of Letsema and Batho Pele, Sister ‘Eva’ Mokoka put aside the pleasures of youth to embark on an arduous journey of improving the health conditions of her people.

In the words of the Managing Director of Otis Elevator Company, which opened a modern centre to replace the one Sister Mokoka used to work at: ‘It is a tribute to the work carried out in the original clinic over the last 43 years by Sister Eva Mokoka and her volunteers’.

Indeed, Sister Mokoka has left a legacy which will always and for ever remind us of the loft virtues of selflessness and putting ourselves at the service of humanity.

No amount of words rolling off our tongues could be adequate in expressing the inner state of grace that charecterises this immeasurable woman.

FOR OUTSTANDING CONTRIBUTION TO RURAL DEVELOPMENT [top]

Clara Basenjeng Masinga personifies resilience, courage, compassion and innovation. In the face of extreme poverty and despair, she always had that deeply humane ability to understand the suffering of others and a burning desire to do something about it.

Masinga is currently a manager of the Kgautswane Multi-purpose Community Centre, which she helped to start. She has facilitated a process of getting final-yearuUniversity students from different academic backgrounds to come to various villages to do their practicals as a form of social reinvestment. She has assisted various schools in fundraising and management. Masinga also supervises and motivates home-based care groups.

Her numerous awards include the Old Mutual, Sowetan, City Press Award for Community-builder of the Year (1997), Old Mutual, Sowetan Award for Community-builder of the decade (1997), two world awards for innovation in the fight against poverty (awarded in Washington DC, 2000) and SA Heroes Award from The Star Newspaper in 2001.

FOR OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN CAMPAIGNING AGAINST DRUGS AND FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF DRUG-COUNSELLING CENTRES (POSTHUMOUS) [top]

Adelle Searll (1944 - 1998), born in Cape Town on 25 September 1944, was a passionate anti-drug campaigner whose work included the founding of the Cape Town Drug-counselling Centre. She was involved with this organisation for more than a decade of its history.

A growing drug problem in the Western Cape meant that the outpatient departments at hospitals and welfare agencies were flooded with addicts and their families seeking help. In 1983, Adele joined a group of doctors and other professionals in forming the Drug Action Committee to raise funds to open a drug-counselling service.

In February 1985, the Drug-counselling Centre was opened. Adele Searle remained involved as a committee member, fundraiser, and for a term, as Chairperson until 1996. Facing ongoing financial problems, Adele ensured that the Centre survived a climate in which many other NGOs fold due to the harsh financial climate. She saw the Centre develop from a small counselling service to a three-level intervention programme, offering solutions to the drug problem in the areas of treatment, training and prevention.

ORDER OF THE GRAND COUNSELLOR OF THE BAOBAB IN SILVER

FOR EXCEPTIONAL EFFORTS IN PEACE-MAKING, THE RENEWAL OF SOUTH AFRICAN SOCIETY AND NATION-BUILDING [top]

Hamilton Mvumelawano Dandala is a peace-maker.

In the early 80s as a prominent member of the Interdenominational African Ministries’ Association, this priest started a conflict-resolution programme to deal with running battles between the United Democratic Front and Azanian People’s Organisation in Port Elizabeth in the Eastern Cape.

In later years, his experience in Port Elizabeth assisted him to face similar circumstances of conflict at several Johannesburg hostels and on the East Rand and in his invaluable work with the Peace Secretariat.

As General Missionary Secretary of the Methodist Church of Southern Africa, umfundisi has helped the church to focus on mobilising community resources for self-development.
He continues to help South Africans to understand the need for a transformed individual, spiritual and social existence.

FOR OUTSTANDING CONTRIBUTION TO EDUCATION, HEALTH, ARTS AND CULTURE AND HIS ACHIEVEMENT IN BUSINESS IN SOUTH AFRICA (POSTHUMOUS) [top]

Ian Haggie (1917 - 2002) contributed widely to varied aspects of South African life including: education, health, finance, culture and the arts. His greatest contribution was the establishment of Primary Health Care Clinics in South Africa. In this he was assisted by the Order of St John, a world-wide organisation synonymous with the current ambulance, first aid and home-care services. Among his prized possessions he treasured the Bailiff Grand Cross awarded by the Queen of England.

FOR EXCEPTIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS IN UNIQUE FORMS OF FINE ARTS UNDER TRYING CIRCUMSTANCES [top]

Noria Mabasa is a fearless artist who for the past 30 years has excelled in the competitive world of art in South Africa and abroad. She started in 1983 as a clay-figure artist. When she decided to move to woodcarving in l994, she was seen as a rebel among the traditionalists and her fellow male artists.

A substantial number of articles have been written about her and are in circulation both locally and internationally. Major reference books on South African art and artists may not be complete without her work and contribution to arts and culture.

FOR LEADERSHIP AND EXCEPTIONAL CONTRIBUTION TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF A NEW INCLUSIVE NATIONAL IDENTITY [top]

Call her the mother of the national symbols. Dr Yvonne Muthien currently serves as Chairperson of the President’s Advisory Council for National Orders under President Thabo Mbeki. She served former President Nelson Mandela in the same capacity.

She was mandated by the Advisory Council to head a technical committee to review the system of national orders: a task that she performed with zeal and great results.

The process that she led finally produced three new Orders: The Order of Mapungubwe (for singular and unique achievement), The Order of Baobab (for unique and dedicated service to the country) and the Order of the Companions of Oliver Tambo (for foreign dignitaries). The new designs are inspired by indigenous history and symbols and have broken new ground in international heraldry.

She has made this exceptional contribution together with her colleagues in the Presidential Advisory Council as part of service to the nation.

FOR MEDICAL RESEARCH AND OUTSTANDING CONTRIBUTION TO UNIVERSITY EDUCATION [top]

Stuart Saunders qualified in medicine at the University Of Cape Town (UCT) in 1953 and did postgraduate work at the Royal Postgraduate Medical School at Hammersmith in London and at Harvard University in Boston. He headed the department of medicine at UCT from 1971 to 1980, where he founded the Liver Research Group and published numerous scientific articles in this regard.

As Vice-Chancellor of UCT from 1981 to 1996, Saunders administered an unprecedented increase in the enrollment of black students.

He also served in the National Working Group established by the Minister of Education to look at the structure of higher education.

Today, he is a consultant physician at Groote Schuur Hospital and a specialist in liver disease.

ORDER OF THE SUPREME COUNSELLOR OF THE BAOBAB IN GOLD

FOR EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE IN LAW, CONSTITUTIONAL JURISPRUDENCE AND HUMAN RIGHTS [top]

History and the people of South Africa remember Justice Arthur Chaskalson as one of the defence lawyers in the Rivonia trial, which saw former President Nelson Mandela being sentenced to life imprisonment. Since then he served South Africa as a human rights lawyer who was ready to be part of the new justice system.

As Chief Justice of South Africa, first president of South Africa’s new Constitutional Court and key advisor on the adoption of the transitional Constitution of South Africa in 1993, he is one of the prime movers of a changing judiciary in South Africa.

In June 1994, he was appointed the first president of South Africa’s new Constitutional Court. He currently serves as Chief Justice of the Republic of South Africa.

FOR EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF BUSINESS IN SOUTH AFRICA AND GROUNDBREAKING INITIATIVES FOR BLACK EMPOWERMENT IN BUSINESS (POSTHUMOUS) [top]

The legacy Marinus Daling (1948 - 2002) left to Sanlam, its shareholders, clients and the economic community of South Africa is indelibly etched in the face of corporate South Africa. The demutualisation of Sanlam in 1998 led to the empowerment of some two million clients as Sanlam shareholders.

He succeeded in turning Sanlam into a focused, streamlined company able to compete with the best in the world.

His belief in empowering people of all walks of life was evident in the many large corporate deals that Sanlam closed. The partnerships it formed with black empowerment companies such as Metropolitan and Nail are shining examples of a changing corporate South Africa.

FOR EXCEPTIONAL CONTRIBUTION TO MATHEMATICS EDUCATION, HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND COMMUNITY SERVICE [top]

Professor Tamsanqa Kambule has, in his long career as an educationist in Soweto, influenced and shaped the minds of many great South Africans, including Nobel Prize winner Desmond Tutu, Jackie Selebi, Frank Chikane, Siphiwe Nyanda, Kaizer Motaung and many others.

Kambule inspired students and educators, and instilled the importance of mathematics in them during his time as school principal of Orlando High School, principal of Pace College in Soweto and Professor at the University of the Witwatersrand.

He is reputed for his motivational skills and dedication towards educating both black and white people in South Africa.

FOR EXCEPTIONAL CONTRIBUTION TO THE STRUGGLE AGAINST APARTHEID AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE LABOUR MOVEMENT (POSTHUMOUS) [top]

Through his determination to make a significant difference in the quality of life of the working class, Moses Mabhida (1923 - 1986) has served the working people through his various positions within the African National Congress (ANC), Communist Party and the South African Congress of Trade Unions (SACTU).

His commitment to change in labour practices took on new momentum after the Defiance Campaign of 1952, when he started working full-time for the trade union movement.

Rising through the lowest ranks of the ANC to become Commander of the people’s army, Umkhonto weSizwe, Mabhida fearlessly fought against oppression by defying all attempts to turn the trade unions into appendages of the property-owning classes.

He served the Communist Party first as member and later as General-Secretary, while serving as vice-president of SACTU.

Mabhida has become a legend in narratives on South African working class struggles.

FOR EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE IN LAW, CONSTITUTIONAL JURISPRUDENCE AND HUMAN RIGHTS (POSTHUMOUS) [top]

For nearly 35 years as advocate and later judge, Prof Ismail Mahomed (1930 - 2000) fought for change in South Africa’s legal and human rights’ landscape.

Through commitment and a deep love for justice, this jurist became the first black person to receive silk under the apartheid state in the 70s’.

A patriot but also a child of the continent, Justice Mahomed served on the bench in Namibia and Bostwana, as judge of the Appeal Court Division in Swaziland and, later as President of the Lesotho Court of Appeal. He played a seminal role in the development of the ground-breaking constitution of the Republic of Namibia.

In 1991, after returning home to South Africa, he broke new ground in South Africa by becoming the first black person to serve in the highly esteemed and powerful position of permanent Supreme Court judge and later served as South Africa’s Chief Justice. He had an indelible impact on South Africa and the world in constitutional jurisprudence, and thought.

FOR EXCEPTIONAL CONTRIBUTION TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF BLACK BUSINESS AND OUTSTANDING LEADERSHIP [top]

Dr Sam Motsuenyane was president of the largest and best-known African business organisation, the National African Federated Chamber of Commerce (NAFCOC) in the 1970s and 1980s. He played a significant role in the development of black business in South Africa, and has received several awards, among others, the Sowetan Business Award, Harvard Business Club Award, the Sunday Times Business Awards, Free Market Award and several awards from the NAFCOC Regional Chambers.

FOR EXCEPTIONAL CONTRIBUTION TO THE FIELD OF NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND FOR DETECTING THE FIRST NATURALLY OCCURRING NEUTRINO (POSTHUMOUS) [top]

Prof Friedel Sellschop (1930 - 2002) is regarded as one of the leading scientists in the field of geoscience in South Africa and the world.

He placed South African science on the map in February 1965 as part of a team that detected the first neutrino in nature, some two miles underground at East Rand Proprietary Mines.

Prof Sellschop contributed to the shaping of science policy in South Africa. Through his guidance and expertise, the then Department of Arts, Culture, Science and Technology undertook the National Research and Technology Foresight exercise, which was completed in 1998.

He held four honorary doctorates, one of which he received from the University of Frankfurt, Germany, in 1989.

FOR EXCEPTIONAL CONTRIBUTION TO THE STRUGGLE AGAINST APARTHEID AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE LABOUR MOVEMENT (POSTHUMOUS) [top]

Mark Shope (1918 - 1998) was the former General-Secretary of the South African Congress of Trade Unions (SACTU). One of South Africa’s outstanding working class intellectuals, he embraced the revolutionary philosophy of Marxism-Leninism. He headed the education department of SACTU for many years.

He was the founder member of the Organisation of African Trade Union Unity and also of the Southern African Trade Union Coordinating Council. He was a commissar in the people’s army, Umkhonto weSizwe, and as an MK soldier, among the first to go for training in the Soviet Union. He was a leading member of the South African Communist Party alongside distinguished freedom fighters such as JB Marks, Moses Kotane, Moses Mabhida and Joe Slovo.

After he returned from exile, he was chosen as an honorary president of the Post and Telecommunications Workers’ Association, now known as the Communications Workers’ Union.
The memory of Mark Shope remains an inspiration to the organic intellectuals of South Africa and all the many workers who crossed his path.

FOR EXCEPTIONAL COMMITMENT TO THE STRUGGLE AGAINST APARTHEID AND DEDICATION TO COMMUNITY SERVICE AND NATION- BUILDING [top]

A true ‘mother and care-giver’ to the needy and destitute, Adelaide Tambo has never ceased to contribute meaningfully to the betterment of women and children.

She started her career as a registered nurse and midwife at Baragwanath Hospital and various other ‘non-European’ hospitals.

In 1960, after the Sharpeville massacre, she left South Africa to join and provide support to her husband and comrade, Dr Oliver Tambo, in exile.

Dedicated to improving the plight of women in the country, on her return to South Africa in 1994 she became treasurer of the ANC Women’s League.

As a member of Parliament since 1994, Tambo served on the portfolio committees on Housing, and Health and Welfare.

She is a recipient of many prestigious awards.

ORDER OF THE COMPANIONS OF O.R. TAMBO IN GOLD

FOR EXCEPTIONAL CONTRIBUTION TO THE STRUGGLE AGAINST APARTHEID IN SOUTH AFRICA AND FOR A JUST WORLD (POSTHUMOUS) [top]

Mahatma Karamchand Gandhi (1869 - 1948) was born on 2 October 1869, at Porbandar, a small town on the western coast of India, which was then one of the many tiny states in Kathiawar.

‘But though Gandhi lived, suffered and died in India for Indians, it is not in relation to India's destiny alone that his life has significance’, says one scribe about the Mahatma.

Any narration of the life of the Mahatma drips the blood ties that knot the ‘great soul in beggar’s garb’ to the history and ultimate liberation of the South African peoples.

He refined his Satyagraha in South Africa after he arrived in KwaZulu-Natal as a mere 24 year-old. Mahatma Gandhi lived for twenty-one years in South Africa. He shaped the destinies of generations to come, both in South Africa and in India.

Gandhi’s resilient but peaceful opposition to all forms of discrimination is known and celebrated the world over. It is a great honour and privilege that his life should be so intimately linked to the history of the freedom struggle in South Africa.

And when he died on 30 January 1948 it is not only India that mourned the loss of a great leader. South Africa also lost a leader.

FOR EXCEPTIONAL CONTRIBUTION TO THE STRUGGLE AGAINST APARTHEID AND FOR JUSTICE IN THE SOUTHERN AFRICAN REGION [top]

Born in April 1924 at Lubwa Mission in the northern province of the Republic of Zambia, Kenneth Kaunda became President of the Republic of Zambia in October 1954.

Kaunda started playing a continental role in 1963 when he became President of the Pan-African Freedom movement for East, Central and Southern Africa. He extended his influence to the global level after Zambia’s independence, serving as chairperson of the Organisation of African Unity from 1970 to 1971 and from 1987 to 1988.

A great friend of the South African liberation struggle, he was close to veterans of the liberation movement such as Oliver Tambo, Walter Sisulu, Chris Hani and others. He maintained his support for the liberation movements despite Pretoria’s policy aimed at destabilisation of governments in the region.

In 1991, he founded the Kenneth Kaunda Peace Foundation dedicated to the establishment of peace and conflict resolution on the continent. KK, as he is fondly known, now devotes his life in fighting HIV/AIDS in Africa.

FOR EXCEPTIONAL CONTRIBUTION TO THE STRUGGLE AGAINST APARTHEID AND FOR A JUST WORLD (POSTHUMOUS) [top]

Olof Palme (1927 - 1986), the late Swedish Prime Minister, was a friend of South Africa. And as a friend he always made himself available to the people of South Africa during some of the country’s most testing times.

Those old enough will remember the devastating effects of the Sharpeville massacre on the psyche of the South African people. Some will recall the benevolent efforts of the Nordic people when they formed the Swedish International Development Authority as a scholarship programme for South African refugees.

Among those gracious people was Olof Palme. He was with us during the aftermath of the Soweto killings in 1976.

Palme was instrumental in obtaining a firm commitment from the Socialist International in support of the African liberation struggle, while constantly challenging the major western powers which continued to undermine international action against the apartheid state.
The entire African continent is indebted to this great leader of the Swedish people. Olof Palme continued till the end of his life to mobilise action for the emancipation of Africa. His last major address was to the Swedish Peoples’ Parliament against apartheid, a week before he was assassinated. He concluded it with a call that ’we must live up to our responsibility for bringing this repulsive system (of apartheid)’.

ORDER OF MAPUNGUBWE IN BRONZE

FOR OUTSTANDING WORK AND LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AS A SCIENTIST, AND RESEARCH INTO THE INHERITED DISORDERS OF THE SKELETON [top]

Peter Beighton’s phenomenal talents and aptitudes redound to the credit of any nation.

Peter Beighton’s extraordinary contributions speak for themselves: Fellow and former Vice-President of the Royal Society of South Africa, former Chairman of the South African Human Genetics Society, Professor of Human Genetics at the University of Cape Town, Director of the MRC Research Unit for Medical Genetics, editor of McKusick’s Heritable disorders of Connective Tissue.

Prof Beighton’s research in this field has been recognised by the award of the Gold Medal of the British Orthopaedic Association, the President’s Medallion of the SA Orthopaedic Association and the Smith & Nephew literary award.

The list of Professor Beighton’s achievements is long and so is the prestige of this distinguished scientist. He has a remarkable academic publication record, and is well-known for his commitment as a teacher.

FOR OUTSTANDING CONTRIBUTION TO MEDICAL SCIENCE [top]

Hamilton Naki was working as a gardener at the University of Cape Town, where he had started at the age of 14, when Dr Robert Goetz asked him to assist in the new surgical laboratory where he learned to anaesthetise dogs for research purposes.

After Goetz left, Naki was serving as a surgical and anaesthetic research assistant at the university when a young cardiac surgeon, Christiaan Barnard, began to further his research into open-heart and cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. Despite his limited conventional education, Naki had a remarkable ability to grasp intricate anatomical structures and medical procedures.

Almost exactly 35 years ago, when Prof Barnard performed the first heart transplant in Cape Town, thus bringing South Africa, the University of Cape Town, and the J.S. Marais Laboratory international attention, it was Naki, by then a principal surgical assistant at the laboratory, doing research into liver transplants, who served as his anaesthetist.

Naki currently lives in Langa in Cape Town and continues to touch hearts with his community work.

ORDER OF MAPUNGUBWE IN GOLD

FOR OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENTS AS A SCIENTIST, AND FOR CO-INVENTING THE CT-SCAN (POSTHUMOUS) [top]

Professor Allan Cormack (1924 - 1998) is a South African. Born in Johannesburg in 1924, he completed his Bachelor and Masters degrees at the University of Cape Town (UCT) and then went to St John’s College, Cambridge as a research student.

In 1950, he returned to UCT as a lecturer and in 1956 he became interested in a scientific phenomenon on which he later collaborated and developed into the CT-scan, commonly known as the cat-scan.

Because his main interest was in nuclear and particle physics he did his early research into the phenomenon part time and only when time permitted. In 1964, he published the results of his work with little response but very soon the scientific establishment became aware of the true significance of his research and from 1970 he devoted most of his time to furher research into the CT-scan.

He won the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 1979 for co-inventing the CT-scan.

FOR EXCEPTIONAL AND UNPARALELED CONTRIBUTION TO PEACE, NATIONAL RECONCILLIATION AND NATION-BUILDING IN THE REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA [top]

Frederik Willem De Klerk goes into the annals of history as the President of the last white minority government who was bold enough to lead white South Africa out of an unsustainable and untenable apartheid system towards a non-racial, non-sexist, prosperous and democratic South Africa.

During his reign, Mr De Klerk went about dismantling many of the provisions of apartheid and setting the stage for the first democratic general election in 1994.

In February 1990, he lifted a 30-year ban on the ANC and other liberation movements and released Nelson Mandela after 27 years in prison. De Klerk and Mandela worked together for political transformation that ended the nation’s era of white minority rule and in 1993, he and Mandela agreed on a timetable for a transition to a non-racial, democratic state.

Nelson Mandela called Mr De Klerk, ‘a man of integrity’. Through the F W De Klerk Foundation he currently focuses his attention on peace, national conciliation and nation-building in the Republic of South Africa.

De Klerk together with Mandela were joint recipients of the Nobel Peace Prize in December 1993.

FOR OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENTS AS A PHYSICIST AND AS FOUNDING PRESIDENT OF THE CSIR (POSTHUMOUS) [top]

Physicist Basil Schonland (1896 - 1972), described as ‘South Africa’s scientist of the twentieth century’, made his name in the early part of the last century by unraveling the mysteries of lightning.

Born and reared in Grahamstown, Schonland was a graduate of Rhodes and Cambridge universities. He later became Chancellor of Rhodes University. He did sterling scientific work during the Second World War and was later appointed by Prime Minister Jan Smuts as founding President of the CSIR (1945 – 1950).

Sir Basil Schonland became Director (1958 – 1961) of the UK’s atomic energy research establishment at Harwell. He established his own research institute, the Bernard Price Institute of Geophysical Research, at the University of the Witwatersrand and played a key role in South Africa’s independent development of the radar during the war.

Sir Basil Schonland remains a guiding light for the innovative spirit of a new South Africa.

ORDER OF MAPUNGUBWE IN PLATINUM

FOR EXCEPTIONAL AND UNEQUALED CONTRIBUTION TO THE LIBERATION STRUGGLE, NATIONAL RECONCILIATION AND NATION- BUILDING IN THE REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA AND FOR UNWAVERING COMMITMENT TO PEACE AND JUSTICE IN THE WORLD [top]

The life, times and achievements of Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela would seem to belong to the realm of mythology and legend.

Born in the humble village of Qunu in the Eastern Cape, the life of the former President of South Africa and the ANC has mirrored the history of South Africa in the 20th Century.

Jailed in 1964 for his opposition against apartheid, Madiba as he is affectionately known, was released from prison in 1991 and led his country through a peaceful transition cited as a miracle by the world.

As the first President of a new non-racial and non-sexist democracy, Mandela captured the souls, imagination and affection of all South Africans. And as a statesman and ex-political prisoner, he has become one of the most revered icons of international peace and human rights.

Former President Nelson Mandela lives in Qunu in retirement but in reality is as busy as ever making peace across the globe, and making sure that the interests of the weak, the children, the youth, the ill, the poor and marginalised remain high on the agendas of the world through the work of the Nelson Mandela Foundation and his work with the Nelson Mandela Children’s Fund.

His life continues to be a source of inspiration not only for the freedom-loving people of this nation but for people all over the world who believe in human dignity and are concerned with the poor and the marginalised.

Mandela was joint recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize with former President FW De Klerk in 1993.

Related information >> Background information on the National Orders