Home
United States Institute of Peace
logo
SitemapSearch

Library Home Page >> Truth Commissions: Chile >> Reports >> Report of the Chilean National Commission on Truth and Reconciliation
Table of Contents >> Previous >> Part Three, Chapter Two (A.2.b.1.1): Victims from the MIR >> Next

Truth Commissions Digital Collection: Reports: Chile


Report of the Chilean
National Commission on
Truth and Reconciliation

Contents

Foreword
Introduction to the English Edition
Guide to the English Edition
Guide to the Editor's Notes
Acronyms
Introduction
Supreme Decree No. 355

PART ONE

Chapter One
Chapter Two

PART TWO

Chapter One
Chapter Two
Chapter Three
Chapter Four

PART THREE

Chapter One

Chapter Two: 1974 through August 1977

  1. Human rights violations committed by government agents or persons working for them

    1. Overview
    2. Cases

      1. Cases similar to the repression patterns of late 1973

      2. Victims from the MIR
        b.1.1) Victims from the MIR
        b.1.4) Late 1974 and early 1975: Villa Grimaldi
      3. Victims from the Communist party
      4. Victims from the Socialist party
      5. Victims from other political groups...
      6. DINA agents who disappeared...
      7. Chileans killed or disappeared...

  2. Human rights violations committed by private citizens...
  3. Reactions of major sectors...

Chapter Three
Chapter Four
Chapter Five

PART FOUR

Chapter One
Chapter Two
Chapter Three
Chapter Four

APPENDICES

Appendix I
Appendix II
Appendix III

 

PART THREE
Chapter Two (A.2.b.1)

1974 through August 1977 (continued)

  1. HUMAN RIGHTS VIOLATIONS COMMITTED BY GOVERNMENT AGENTS OR PERSONS WORKING FOR THEM (continued)

    1. CASES (continued)

      1. Victims from the MIR

        1. Cases in which the DINA was responsible

          During 1974 the primary aim of the DINA's repressive activity was to dismantle the MIR, and that continued to be a priority in 1975. It was during these two years that the largest number of people lost their lives at the hands of the DINA. Although most of these people disappeared, there were also cases of people who were executed or tortured to death whose families recovered their bodies. By way of exception, this section presents the cases of some people who were not MIR members as well as cases in which the perpetrators were not part of the DINA or in which the Commission could not be certain of the agency to which they belonged, when such a procedure is necessary for providing an accurate sequential view of what happened.

          b.1.1) First half of 1974: the DINA's first victims

          In April, May, and June, 1974 one could observe the first indications that the DINA was employing forced disappearance more systematically against the MIR. It was also clear that the DINA was being more selective in arresting people. During this period the DINA was using the secret detention and torture site at Londres No. 38.

          On April 4, 1974, the MIR activist Gonzalo Marcial TORO GARLAND was arrested by DINA agents in the streets of Santiago. He was wounded during the arrest, and hence his captors took him to the military hospital. Witnesses saw him at the hospital, apparently in very critical condition. He then disappeared, and there has been no further evidence about his fate. The Commission is convinced that his disappearance was the work of government agents who thus violated his human rights.

          On May 20, 1974, Alvaro Modesto VALLEJOS VILLAGRAN, a MIR activist, was arrested at his home in Maipú. Many witnesses have provided consistent testimony that he was held at Londres No. 38. On July 29, agents in civilian clothes took him to his parents' house, and he was there for fifteen minutes. Witnesses have testified that he was later held at Cuatro Alamos. He was last seen at Colonia Dignidad. This Commission is convinced that his disappearance was the work of government agents who thus violated his human rights.

          On May 23, 1974, Jorge Arturo GREZ ABURTO, a MIR activist, was arrested on the street in Santiago. Witnesses have stated that he was held at the Londres No. 38 location. There has been no further word on his whereabouts. In response to a consultation from the appeals court in Santiago, the Interior Ministry acknowledged (in an official document dated September 4, 1974) that he had been arrested because there was a decree ordering it, but it did not indicate where the prisoner was being held. There has been no word about him since then. The Commission is convinced that his disappearance was the work of government agents who thus violated his human rights.

          On May 25, 1974, the MIR activist Agustín Eduardo REYES GONZALEZ was arrested by DINA agents. Witnesses later saw him at Londres No. 38, but there has been no further information on his whereabouts. The Commission is convinced that his disappearance was the work of government agents who thus violated his human rights.

          On June 4, 1974, the MIR activist Carlos Luis CUBILLOS GALVEZ was arrested in the street in the Ñuñoa district. Witnesses say he was taken to the DINA facility at Londres No. 38. There has been no further word about him. The Commission is convinced that his disappearance was the work of government agents who thus violated his human rights.

          On June 15, 1974, the MIR activist Eduardo Humberto ZIEDE GOMEZ was arrested by DINA agents on the streets of Santiago. On June 26 the FER (student section of MIR) activist Marcela Soledad SEPULVEDA TRONCOSO, who was politically connected to Eduardo Ziede, was arrested at her home in Santiago. Her family had been harassed, and her mother had even been arrested. The Commission is convinced that the disappearance of these two people was the work of government agents who violated their human rights.

          On June 17, 1974, police from the Ninth station in Santiago arrested Albano Augustín FIORASO CHAU, who was apparently connected to the MIR, on a public thoroughfare. Another person was arrested along with him but was later released. His captors took Fioraso to the Ninth station. There has been no further information on him since then. When consulted by the courts, officials repeatedly denied that Fioraso had been arrested. However, in January 1975 the Interior Ministry informed the appeals court that he had been arrested by police, but that he had been released. His family says that police from the Ninth station told them that they had turned him over to the Military Intelligence Service. The evidence gathered leads the Commission to the conviction that Albano Fioraso disappeared at the hands of government agents in violation of his human rights, although this action cannot be attributed to a particular agency.

          On June 18, 1974, the MIR activist Jorge Enrique ESPINOZA MENDEZ was arrested in the street in downtown Santiago. Hours later that same day, civilian agents raided and searched his house. He was last seen by witnesses at Londres No. 38. He disappeared while being held by the DINA, and there has been no further information on him. The Commission is convinced that his disappearance was the work of government agents who thus violated his human rights.

          b.1.2) Winter [July-August]a 1974: Maximum activity at Londres No. 38

          In July 1974 the DINA accelerated its anti-MIR activity. Many people who were working underground in the MIR were arrested that month. These arrests were followed by interrogation under torture thus enabling the DINA to garner further information on the MIR and thereby to arrest more people. Due to escalating repression, the facility at Londres No. 38 was continually full of prisoners in July and August 1974. Many of these prisoners disappeared. Most of them were seen by witnesses at Londres No. 38. However, there is also proof that several of these prisoners were later transferred to Cuatro Alamos and were last seen there.

          On July 8, 1974, Héctor Marcial GARAY HERMOSILLA and Miguel Angel ACUÑA CASTILLO, two friends who were active in FER (the high school section of MIR), were arrested by unidentified agents at their homes in the Ñuñoa district. There is no evidence of their whereabouts since then. The Commission has proof that both young men were arrested. On that basis, and bearing in mind their political activism, their political ties, their friendship, and the fact that they were arrested on the same day and that nothing further has been known about them, the Commission regards them as victims of human rights violations committed by government agents.

          On July 10, 1974, Bárbara URIBE TAMBLAY, and Edwin Francisco VAN JURICK ALTAMIRANO, who were husband and wife, were arrested in different parts of Santiago, along with Edwin's brother Cristián Van Jurick. All of them were active in the MIR. The agents who arrested them said they were from the DINA, and they came back to the family several times during the next few days, sometimes bringing one of those arrested with them. In August 1974, in response to a request from the British embassy, the Foreign Ministry stated that Edwin Francisco Van Jurick and Bárbara Uribe were being held in preventive detention pending an investigation, and that they were in good health. Subsequently, in response to an inquiry from the Santiago appeals court, that same Foreign Ministry stated that the previous information had been a "regrettable error." Except for that one instance, officials continued to deny that these three people had been arrested until January 1975 when they acknowledged that Cristián Van Jurick was under arrest at the Ritoque facility, where he was able to receive visitors. Several witnesses testify that this married couple was held at Londres No. 38 subsequent to their arrest, and that they were taken to Cuatro Alamos. They disappeared from that site while in the DINA's hands. The Commission is convinced that their human rights were violated by government agents who made them disappear.

          On July 13, 1974, DINA agents arrested the MIR activist Jaime Mauricio BUZZIO LORCA as he was arriving at his house in the Ñuñoa district. He was held at the Londres No. 38 site. Some days after his arrest he was taken back to his house for a short period. The last trace of him was at the Londres No. 38 location. The Commission is convinced that his disappearance was the work of government agents who thus violated his human rights.

          On July 14, 1974, DINA agents arrested the MIR activist Abundio Alejandro CONTRERAS GONZALEZ at his home in the La Cisterna district. In the next few days, two other MIR activists who had ties with him, Germán Rodolfo MORENO FUENZALIDA and Marcos Esteban QUIÑONES LEMBACH, were arrested. Germán Moreno was arrested July 15, 1974, on Calle Independencia. Two days later his captors took him to his home where they also arrested Marcos Quiñones who had gone there. Witnesses have testified that the prisoners were held at Londres No. 38. They disappeared from that site. The Interior Ministry acknowledged the arrest of Germán Rodolfo Moreno in a decree that referred to his presence at the Cuatro Alamos facility. However, in its reply to the courts, the ministry said that by virtue of another decree he had been released but it provided no further evidence or proof that such was in fact the case. The Commission is convinced that the disappearance of these three persons was the work of government agents who thus violated their human rights.

          Also on July 14, Artemio Segundo GUTIERREZ AVILA and Francisco Javier FUENTEALBA FUENTEALBA, who apparently had MIR ties, were arrested at their workplace in downtown Santiago. These prisoners disappeared, and there is evidence that they had been held at Londres No. 38. The Interior Ministry acknowledged that Artemio Gutiérrez had been arrested and said that he was at the Cuatro Alamos site. In January 1975 his name appeared in a news item in the Diario La Segunda which listed the names of people allowed to leave the country for Mexico. His family members found no other evidence to confirm that report. Much later, in 1985, his name appeared on a list of people allowed to enter the country. The various official items of information on Artemio Gutiérrez' leaving the country are not credible since they are not based on any reliable documentation, they offer no precise information concerning the date on which he is supposed to have left the country nor how he is said to have done so, and to this day there is no evidence to support such a claim. The Commission is convinced that the disappearance of these two prisoners was the work of government agents who thus violated their human rights.

          On July 16, 1974, the MIR leader Máximo Antonio GEDDA ORTIZ was arrested by DINA agents. He disappeared from the DINA facility at Londres No. 38, where witnesses saw him. The Commission is convinced that his disappearance was the work of government agents who thus violated his human rights.

          On July 17, 1974, the MIR activist Jaime del Tránsito CADIZ NORAMBUENA was arrested by unidentified agents in the Jos?é María Caro shantytown. He disappeared from the DINA facility at Londres No. 38, where witnesses saw him. The Commission is convinced that his disappearance was the work of government agents who thus violated his human rights.

          On July 18, 1974, the MIR activist Daniel Abraham REYES PIÑA was arrested on the street in Santiago. That day his captors took him to his house to look for some papers. Daniel Abraham Reyes disappeared from the DINA facility at Londres No. 38, where witnesses saw him. The Commission is convinced that his disappearance was the work of government agents who thus violated his human rights.

          On July 19 and 20, 1974, two friends and MIR activists, Pedro Enrique POBLETE CORDOBA and Leopoldo Daniel MUÑOZ ANDRADE, were arrested. Several witnesses have testified that they were taken to the Londres No. 38 site. They were later transferred to Cuatro Alamos. They then disappeared while in the hands of the DINA. The Commission is convinced that their disappearance was the work of government agents who thus violated their human rights.

          On July 17, 1974, DINA agents arrested the MIR activist María Inés ALVARADO BORGEL in the Providencia district. Her captors later took her to the home of Martín ELGUETA PINTO, who was also arrested along with Juan Rosendo CHACON OLIVARES. These two were active in MIR. Other persons were arrested with them but were later released. During the days after her arrest, her captors took María Inés Alvarado to her family's house several times. All three disappeared from the Londres No. 38 site, where they had been seen by witnesses. The Commission is convinced that the disappearance of these three people was the work of government agents who thus violated their human rights.

          On July 20, 1974, DINA agents arrested the MIR leader Luis Julio GUAJARDO ZAMORANO, who was at a bicycle shop near the Club Hípico [horse racetrack] in Santiago. The same agents later went back to arrest the shop owner, Sergio Daniel TORMEN MENDEZ, along with two other persons, including Sergio Tormen's brother, Peter. They were later released. On July 27, 1974, José Manuel RAMIREZ ROSALES, who had taken Luis Julio Guajardo's place in the MIR after his arrest, was himself arrested at his home. These three disappeared while being held by the DINA. Witnesses have testified that they were held at the Londres No. 38 site. The Commission is convinced that these three people disappeared at the hands of government agents in violation of their human rights.

          On July 24, 1974, Sergio Arturo FLORES PONCE, a MIR activist, was arrested by DINA agents in the downtown area of Santiago as he was walking with another person who managed to escape. This prisoner disappeared while being held by the DINA. There is evidence that he was held at Londres No. 38. The Commission is convinced that his disappearance was the work of government agents who thus violated his human rights.

          On July 25, 1974, two MIR activists, Ramón Osvaldo NUÑEZ ESPINOZA and Juan Ernesto IBARRA TOLEDO, were arrested, Nuñez at his house in the San Genaro shantytown and Ibarra in the street. Both were taken to the DINA facility at Londres No. 38 where they were last seen. The Commission is convinced that their disappearance was the work of government agents who thus violated their human rights.

          On July 26, 1974, the MIR activist Ismael Darío CHAVEZ LOBOS was arrested by unidentified agents at his home in Santiago. He disappeared, and there is no proof that he was held at any particular detention site. The Commission has decided that the items of evidence indicating the arrest of Ismael Darío Chávez are precise enough to enable it to come to the conviction that his disappearance was due to action by government agents, although it cannot specify the agency to which they belonged.

          On July 27, 1974, DINA agents arrested the MIR activist Juan Bautista BARRIOS BARROS [sic] on the streets of Santiago. Three days later he was taken to the home of Ofelio de la Cruz LAZO LAZO in Villa Manuel Rodríguez. Lazo also apparently had MIR ties and was arrested. Both men were then taken to the home of Eduardo ALARCON JARA in the Robert Kennedy shantytown, where Alarcón, who also had MIR ties, was arrested. Although there is no clear evidence to indicate where the three prisoners were taken, the Commission has decided that the accounts by witnesses and other evidence on the arrests of these three people are sufficient to enable it to come to the conviction that Juan Barrios, Ofelio Lazo, and Eduardo Alarcón disappeared at the hands of government agents in violation of their human rights, even though it cannot determine to what agency those who arrested them belonged.

          Also on July 27, 1974, Jorge Alejandro OLIVARES GRAINDORGE, who apparently had MIR ties, was arrested on the streets of Santiago. Three days later, Olivares was taken to the house of his friend, Zacarías Antonio MACHUCA MUÑOZ, who also had MIR ties and was likewise arrested. The two prisoners disappeared while in the hands of the DINA. They were seen at the Londres No. 38 site. The Commission is convinced that their disappearance was the work of government agents who thus violated their human rights.

          On July 28, 1974, Hernán SARMIENTO SABATER and Arnoldo Vivian LAURIE LUENGO, who were friends and apparently had MIR ties, were arrested in Parral by local police. Witnesses saw them being held at the police station there. There is evidence to indicate that Hernán Sarmiento and Arnoldo Vivian Laurie were transferred to Santiago to the facility at Londres No. 38. From that point onward there was no further word on them. The Commission came to the conviction that these two men disappeared at the hands of government agents in violation of their human rights, although it cannot determine the agency to which those apprehending them belonged.

          In the early morning hours of July 18, 1974, in central Santiago DINA agents occupied the house of the MIR activist Luis Armando VALENZUELA FIGUEROA and arrested him when he arrived. His stepfather was also arrested and was held with Luis Valenzuela at Londres No. 38, but was then released. Valenzuela was held at the Londres No. 38 site, and was never seen again. The Commission is convinced that his disappearance was the work of government agents who thus violated his human rights.

          On July 30, 1974, DINA agents arrested the MIR leader Alfonso René CHANFREAU OYARCE at his house in the northern part of Santiago. The next day his wife was arrested and was held with him at Londres No. 38, and was later released. Alfonso Chanfeau was held at the DINA facility at Londres No. 38, but there is also evidence to indicate that he was later taken to Villa Grimaldi for interrogation. The Commission is convinced that his disappearance was the work of government agents who thus violated his human rights.

          On August 6, 1974, DINA agents arrested the MIR activist María Angélica ANDREOLI BRAVO at her home in the Las Condes district. The same group of agents also arrested another MIR activist that day, Muriel DOCKENDORFF NAVARRETE. Both women disappeared while in the hands of the DINA. Many witnesses saw both of them at the Londres No. 38 site. Muriel Dockendorff was later transferred to Cuatro Alamos and then disappeared. The Commission is convinced that the disappearance of these two women was the work of government agents who thus violated their human rights.

          On August 12, 1974, the MIR activist María Cecilia LABRIN SASO was arrested by unidentified plainclothes agents at her home in the Las Condes district. Although there is no exact evidence to indicate where she was taken, there are enough witnesses to her arrest to lead to the conviction that María Labrín disappeared at the hands of government agents in violation of her human rights.

          On August 13, 1974, the MIR activist Newton Larraín MORALES SAAVEDRA was arrested at his home in Santiago. He disappeared from the DINA facility at Londres No. 38, where witnesses saw him. The Commission is convinced that his disappearance was the work of government agents who thus violated his human rights.

          On August 15, 1974, the MIR activist Alvaro Miguel BARRIOS DUQUE was arrested at his home in the Conchalí district. That same day Hernán Galo GONZALEZ INOSTROZA and his sister María Elena GONZALEZ INOSTROZA, both of whom were active in the MIR, were arrested at their home in the downtown area of Santiago. Witnesses have testified that they saw them at the Londres No. 38 site. Witnesses also say that Hernán and María González Inostroza were transferred to Cuatro Alamos. They then disappeared while being held by the DINA. The Commission is convinced that the disappearance of these three persons was the work of government agents who thus violated their human rights.

          On August 15, 1974, Ricardo Aurelio TRONCOSO MUÑOZ, a MIR activist, was arrested by DINA agents at his home in Santiago. His arrest took place in conjunction with that of Hernán Galo González Inostroza and María Elena González Inostroza who subsequently disappeared. Where Ricardo Troncoso was taken is unknown. The testimony and other evidence this Commission received enable it to assert that Ricardo Troncoso was arrested and disappeared at the hands of government agents; his whereabouts remain unknown to this day.

          On August 16, 1974, the MIR activist Carlos Eladio SALCEDO MORALES was arrested in Santiago. Witnesses have testified that he was held at the DINA facilities at Londres No. 38, with José Domingo Cañas, and Cuatro Alamos. He disappeared from this last site. The Commission is convinced that his disappearance was the work of government agents who thus violated his human rights.

          On August 22, 1974, civilian agents who did not identify themselves arrested Jesús de la Paz RODRIGUEZ GONZALEZ at his home in the Santa Laura shantytown in Santiago. Two days later he was taken to the house of his brother, Artagnan RODRIGUEZ GONZALEZ, who was connected to the MIR and was also arrested. Even though the Rodríguez brothers disappeared and there is no proof that they were held at any detention sites, the Commission has decided that there is sufficient testimony to their arrest to attribute their disappearance to government agents, who thus violated their human rights.

          That same day, August 22, the MIR activist Teobaldo Antonio TELLO GARRIDO was arrested in Santiago. He disappeared from the DINA facility at Cuatro Alamos, where he was seen by witnesses. The Commission is convinced that his disappearance was the work of government agents who thus violated his human rights.

          On August 26, 1974, DINA agents came to the home of Gloria Ester LAGOS NILSSON in Lo Espejo and arrested her common-law husband, a MIR activist who then managed to escape through a window. That same night the agents returned and arrested Gloria Lagos. There has been no further information on her. The Commission has decided that the accounts by witnesses to her arrest and the other evidence in the case are sufficient to enable it to come to the conviction that Gloria Ester Lagos disappeared as a result of actions by government agents who thus violated her human rights.

          Also on August 26, the MIR activist Francisco Javier BRAVO NUÑEZ was arrested at his home in the San Miguel district. He was taken to the DINA facility at Cuatro Alamos. According to witnesses, he disappeared while at that site. The Commission is convinced that his disappearance was the work of government agents who thus violated his human rights.

          On August 29, 1974, DINA agents arrested Violeta del Carmen LOPEZ DIAZ, who apparently had MIR connections, at her home in the San Miguel district. A family friend was arrested with her, but he was released a few days later. She was taken to the Cuatro Alamos site and then disappeared. The Commission is convinced that her disappearance was the work of government agents who thus violated her human rights.

          On August 30, 1974, Eduardo Alberto CANCINO ALCAINO, an office worker and a MIR activist, was killed. He had been arrested August 22 at his parents' home. The next day he was taken to his own home for a short while, and was able to indicate to his family that he had been beaten. His body was later found on the El Melón upgrade. According to the death certificate, he had died August 30. Without being able to indicate the exact cause of death, the autopsy report mentions damage inflicted by blunt objects on his chest, abdomen, lower extremities, and hips, and to the lumbar, sacral, and dorsal regions, and to the scalp. Thus it is possible to come to the conviction that he died as a result of the torture he underwent at the hands of government agents in violation of his human rights.

          On September 2, 1974, the MIR activist Luis Alberto GUENDELMAN WISNIAK was arrested by DINA agents at his home in the Las Condes district. The agents had brought a friend of his who had been released shortly before. Several witnesses have testified that Luis Guendelman was held at DINA sites and was last seen at Cuatro Alamos. As was noted earlier in this chapter, in July 1975 the DINA attempted to present a body found in Argentina as the remains of Luis Guendelman as part of a disinformation operation known as "Operation Colombo." The Commission is convinced that his disappearance was the work of government agents who thus violated his human rights.

          On September 5, 1974, DINA agents accompanied by police arrested Sonia de las Mercedes BUSTOS REYES, an active Christian Democrat, at her home in Santiago. She was apparently accused of having MIR ties. Some days later Bustos' sister was arrested and was held at detention sites and then released. Witnesses have testified that they saw Sonia Bustos in the DINA compounds at Londres No. 38 and Cuatro Alamos. She disappeared from this latter site. The Commission is convinced that her disappearance was the work of government agents who thus violated her human rights.

          On September 6, 1974, Héctor Genaro GONZALEZ FERNANDEZ and Roberto Salomón CHAER VASQUEZ, who were friends and co-workers and apparently had MIR ties, were arrested in the street. On September 10 Carlos Julio FERNANDEZ ZAPATA, who was politically connected to González and Chaer, was arrested in the Quinta Normal district. Evidence indicates that these prisoners were held at an unidentified facility, which was apparently located in Quinta Normal. All three disappeared while being held by the DINA. Witnesses have testified that Héctor Genaro González and Carlos Julio Fernández were held at Cuatro Alamos. The Commission is convinced that the disappearance of these three persons was the work of government agents who thus violated their human rights.

          Also on September 6, DINA agents arrested Mónica Chislayne LLANCA ITURRA, who had MIR ties, at her home in the Conchalí district. She disappeared from the Cuatro Alamos compound, where witnesses saw her. The Commission is convinced that her disappearance was the work of government agents who thus violated her human rights.

          b.1.3) Spring [August-November] 1974: The José Domingo Cañas facility

          In late August the DINA operational teams transferred most of their operation to the José Domingo Cañas compound and continued to carry out arrests at a rapid pace. During this period the DINA's efforts were focussed on locating Miguel Enríquez Espinosa, the MIR general secretary who was underground, and they were successful in October 1974. Most of the prisoners who were caught in the process of searching for the MIR general secretary were held at the José Domingo Cañas site. A significant portion of those arrested in September, October, and November of 1974 were interrogated and tortured at José Domingo Cañas, and a number of them disappeared while they were in the DINA's hands. Some were taken to Cuatro Alamos and were last seen there. A significant number of prisoners were also first taken to José Domingo Cañas and then transferred to Villa Grimaldi when that property began to function as a secret detention and torture site.

          On August 22, 1974, the MIR activist Modesto Segundo ESPINOZA POZO, an accountant, was arrested in Santiago. He disappeared while in the hands of the DINA. Witnesses saw him at the José Domingo Cañas and Cuatro Alamos detention site. The Commission is convinced that his disappearance was the work of government agents who thus violated his human rights.

          On August 27, 1974, DINA agents arrested the MIR activist Jackeline del Carmen BINFA CONTRERAS in downtown Santiago. Witnesses saw her at José Domingo Cañas, and last saw her at Cuatro Alamos. The Commission is convinced that her disappearance was the work of government agents who thus violated her human rights.

          On September 7, 1974, DINA agents arrested the architect Francisco Eduardo AEDO CARRASCO, who apparently had MIR ties, at his home in Santiago. On September 14, 1974, the draftsman and MIR activist Bernardo de CASTRO LOPEZ, who had political ties to Francisco Aedo, was also arrested at his home by DINA agents. Both of them disappeared while under the DINA's control. Witnesses saw Francisco Aedo at the José Domingo Cañas and Cuatro Alamos compounds. The Commission is convinced that their disappearance was the work of government agents who thus violated their human rights.

          On September 10, 1974, the MIR activist Carlos Fredy PEREZ VARGAS was arrested where he worked in downtown Santiago. On September 29, his brother, Aldo Gonzalo PEREZ VARGAS, who was also active in the MIR, was arrested. Witnesses have said that the two brothers disappeared from the DINA compound at José Domingo Cañas. The Commission is convinced that their disappearance was the work of government agents who thus violated their human rights.

          On September 13, 1974, DINA agents arrested two friends, Víctor Alfonso MARTINEZ and José Hipólito JARA CASTRO, both of whom were active in the MIR. On September 14, Sergio Hernán LAGOS HIDALGO, a MAPU activist who was also apparently involved in the MIR, was arrested in Santiago. These three prisoners disappeared while under DINA control. By the time they disappeared they had probably been taken to the José Domingo Cañas compound. José Hipólito Jara is known to have been seen at Cuatro Alamos. There has been no further information on these people. The Commission is convinced that the disappearance of these three persons was the work of government agents who thus violated their human rights.

          On September 16, 1974, DINA agents arrested the MIR activist Héctor Cayetano ZUNIGA TAPIA on the streets of Santiago. His captors then took him to his house in Villa John Kennedy. That same day the MIR activist Vicente Segundo PALOMINO BENITEZ was arrested in downtown Santiago by unidentified plainclothes agents. His captors twice took him to the photography laboratory that he owned. Even though there is no evidence of the sites to which they were taken, the Commission believes that the testimony on their arrests is sufficient to lead to the conviction that both prisoners disappeared at the hands of government agents in violation of their human rights. The Commission believes that the agents who arrested Héctor Zúñiga can be identified as DINA members.

          On September 17, 1974, DINA agents arrested the MIR activist Manuel Jesús VILLALOBOS DIAZ at his home in the central area of Santiago. Since then there has been no further word about him. Testimony by witnesses to his arrest have enabled the Commission to come to the conviction that Manuel Jesús Villalobos disappeared while in the hands of the DINA in violation of his human rights.

          That same day September 17, the MIR activist Mamerto Eulogio ESPINOZA HENRIQUEZ, who apparently had direct ties to the top leader of the organization, Miguel Enríquez, who was then in hiding, was arrested at an office in downtown Santiago. A woman MIR activist was arrested along with Mamerto Espinoza, but she was later released. Witnesses have said that he was held at the DINA facility on Calle José Domingo Cañas. The Commission is convinced that his disappearance was the work of government agents who thus violated his human rights.

          Likewise on September 17, Néstor Alfonso GALLARDO AGUERO, 24, an accountant who was the regional MIR leader in Temuco, disappeared. He was arrested by DINA agents in Santiago. Witnesses have testified that they saw him at Cuatro Alamos and later at Villa Grimaldi. The Commission is convinced that his disappearance was the work of government agents who thus violated his human rights.

          On September 10, 1974, the architect and MIR leader from Valparaíso Carlos Alfredo GAJARDO WOLFF, who was living underground and was being heavily pursued by the security services, disappeared in Santiago. Although there is no exact evidence that he was arrested or held at detention sites, the Commission has come to the conviction that he was subjected to forced disappearance by government agents in violation of his human rights. In doing so, the Commission has kept in mind his political activity, the fact that he was being sought by security agencies, the situation of persecution existing at that time, and the fact that there has been no further word about him, nor has any written record of his activities been found, despite all the efforts that have been made.

          Also on September 20, the MIR activist Luis Fernando FUENTES RIQUELME disappeared in Santiago. There is no exact information on the arrest of Luis Fuentes or his presence in prison sites. The Commission nonetheless has come to the conviction that he disappeared at the hands of government agents. It came to this conviction by examining indications that are sufficiently compelling, as well as other factors, such as his political activism, the period in which he disappeared, and the fact that there has been no information about him, and that he has not been registered as being involved in any transactions over such a long period, despite the efforts made to locate him.

          On September 21, 1974, DINA agents arrested a married couple in Santiago, both of whom were MIR activists, Lumi VIDELA MOYA and Sergio PEREZ MOLINA. Many witnesses observed them being held at the José Domingo Cañas site. On November 3, Lumi Videla died during a torture session at the José Domingo Cañas facility. According to the autopsy report, the exact cause of her death was suffocation of the mouth and nose while the body was prone and face down. Sergio Pérez disappeared from that same facility. On November 4, 1974 Lumi Videla's body was found just inside the wall around the patio garden at the Italian embassy in the Providencia district. The press at that time said that she had been killed during an orgy by those who had taken asylum in the embassy. However, the embassy denied that Lumi Videla had taken asylum on the embassy grounds. The Commission came to the conviction that Sergio Pérez disappeared as a result of the actions of DINA agents, and that Lumi Videla died of torture likewise inflicted by DINA agents, and that the human rights of both were violated.

          On September 22, 1974, DINA agents arrested the MIR activist María Cristina LOPEZ STEWART at her home in the Las Condes district. A married couple living there was arrested with her and was released some time later. She was taken to the José Domingo Cañas location and was last seen there. The Commission is convinced that her disappearance was the work of government agents who thus violated her human rights.

          On September 24, 1974, the MIR activist Carlos Alberto ARACENA TORO disappeared in Santiago. There is evidence that he was arrested at his home in downtown Santiago by unidentified agents. Although there is no subsequent information to indicate where Carlos Aracena was taken by his captors, the Commission has decided that the evidence of his arrest is sufficient to conclude that he disappeared as the result of actions by government agents who thus violated his human rights.

          On September 25, 1974, Ariel Martín SALINAS ARGOMEDO, who had MIR ties, was arrested. That same night he was taken to his brother's house in the Las Condes district. Subsequently he was held at the DINA José Domingo Cañas and Villa Grimaldi facilities and disappeared from the latter site. The Commission is convinced that his disappearance was the work of government agents who thus violated his human rights.

          Also on September 25, plainclothes agents arrested the MIR activist Mario Eduardo CALDERON TAPIA in downtown Santiago. Witnesses attest that he was held at the José Domingo Cañas, Villa Grimaldi, and Cuatro Alamos DINA facilities, and that he disappeared from Cuatro Alamos in mid-November. The Commission is convinced that his disappearance was the work of government agents who thus violated his human rights.

          In October 1974, witnesses saw Antonio LLIDO MENGUAL, a former priest of Spanish nationality, at the José Domingo Cañas facility. The date of his arrest is not known. Antonio Llido was later transferred to Cuatro Alamos, and he then disappeared while he was under the DINA's control. The Commission is convinced that his disappearance was the work of government agents who thus violated his human rights.

          On October 2, 1974, plainclothes agents arrested the MIR activist Cecilia Miguelina BOJANIC ABAD, who was four months pregnant. Her captors took her and her son to her parents' home where they left the child and arrested her husband, Flavio Arquimides OYARZUN SOTO, who was also active in the MIR. Witnesses saw the couple at the José Domingo Cañas DINA location. They were later transferred to Cuatro Alamos and disappeared in mid-October. The Commission is convinced that their disappearance was the work of government agents who thus violated their human rights.

          On October 3, 1974, DINA agents violently burst into the house of the Andrónico Antequera family in the La Granja district and arrested the MIR activists Jorge Elías ANDRONICO ANTEQUERA and Luis Francisco GONZALEZ MANRIQUEZ, along with another person who was released a few hours later. The agents remained in the house, and in the early morning of October 4 they arrested another MIR activist, Juan Carlos ANDRONICO ANTEQUERA, upon his arrival. Witnesses have testified that the prisoners were taken to the José Domingo Cañas facility and then taken to Cuatro Alamos, where they disappeared while still under DINA control. The Commission is convinced that their disappearance was the work of government agents who thus violated their human rights.

          On October 4, 1974, DINA agents arrested the MIR activist Amelia Ana BRUHN FERNANDEZ at her workplace, along with a friend who was later released. Witnesses have testified that Amelia Ana Bruhn was held at the José Domingo Cañas location and then at Cuatro Alamos, where she was seen last. The Commission is convinced that her disappearance was the work of government agents who thus violated her human rights.

          Most cases during this period were related to the DINA's efforts to locate Miguel ENRIQUEZ ESPINOSA, a physician who was the MIR general secretary and party leader. This became the DINA's main objective and led to a chain of arrests that had begun with that of Lumi Videla and Sergio Pérez. On October 5, 1974, the house in the San Miguel district where Miguel Enríquez was hiding was surrounded by a large contingent of security agents as well as a tank and a helicopter, and they began firing. Among the people in the house was a pregnant woman who was injured. Miguel Enríquez was killed in the shootout. The autopsy report said he was hit by ten bullets. In accordance with the criteria laid down in Part One, Chapter Two of this report, the Commission cannot regard the death of Miguel Enríquez as a human rights violation in the strict sense. However, it does believe that he lost his life as a result of the situation of political violence, since he died resisting arrest by an agency which he had grounds for believing would torture and kill him if he were arrested.

          On October 7, 1974, a group of DINA agents arrested Eduardo Francisco MIRANDA LOBOS, 27, a surveyor and MIR activist, on Calle Nataniel in Santiago. He was no longer active in the organization, however. A few days before his arrest he had told a female friend of his former political sympathies. In September 1973 soldiers had raided his house in Los Angeles. According to a witness, he was held prisoner until October 17, 1974, apparently at the Tres Alamos site. The Interior Ministry repeatedly told the courts that there was an order to arrest Eduardo Miranda. Nevertheless, three years later his name appeared on the "list of 119" Chilean citizens allegedly killed in shootouts in Argentina. The Commission has come to the conviction that Eduardo Miranda disappeared at the hands of government agents who thus violated his human rights.

          On October 24, 1974, DINA agents arrested Eugenia del Carmen MARTINEZ HERNANDEZ, who apparently had MIR ties, while she was at her job at the Labán textile factory. The next day plainclothes agents raided her house. Witnesses testify that Eugenia del Carmen Martínez was held at the La Venda Sexy site and later at Cuatro Alamos, where she was last seen. The Commission is convinced that her disappearance was the work of government agents who thus violated her human rights.

          On October 30, 1974, DINA agents arrested Jacqueline Paulette DROUILLY JURICH at her home in the Providencia district. They then occupied the house until the early morning hours of the 31st when they arrested her husband, Marcelo Eduardo SALINAS EYTEL, a MIR activist, as he arrived home. On October 31, Jorge Humberto D'ORIVAL BRICEÑO, a MIR activist, who had political ties to Marcelo Eduardo Salinas, was arrested by DINA agents at his home in the Conchalí district. Witnesses testify that the married couple was held prisoner at Villa Grimaldi. Jacqueline Drouilly is also said to have passed through the José Domingo Cañas site. The three prisoners were last seen at Cuatro Alamos. They disappeared from that site while under the DINA's control. The Commission is convinced that the disappearance of these three persons was the work of government agents who thus violated their human rights.

          On November 13, 1974, the Spanish teacher and MIR activist Ariel Danton SANTIBAÑEZ ESTAY, was arrested in Santiago. The next day plainclothes agents told his wife that he had been arrested and searched their house. Some days later a plainclothes agent visited his sister and told her of his arrest and the state of his health. Ariel Santibáñez disappeared while under the control of his captors. It has not been possible to determine the sites where he was held. The Commission believes that the evidence of his arrest, taken in conjunction with the general circumstances of the persecution of the MIR at that time, is sufficiently compelling to enable it to come to the conviction that he disappeared at the hands of government agents who violated his human rights.

          On November 16, 1974, DINA agents arrested the MIR activist Sergio Alfonso REYES NAVARRETE at his home in the downtown area of Santiago. He disappeared that day while in the hands of his captors. There is no certain evidence that he was held at detention sites. The Commission regards the testimony by witnesses to his arrest to be sufficiently accurate and credible to enable it to come to the conviction that Sergio Reyes Navarrete disappeared at the hands of government agents in violation of his human rights.

          On November 17, 1974, DINA agents arrested Cecilia Gabriela CASTRO SALVADORES and her husband Juan Carlos RODRIGUEZ ARAYA, both of whom were MIR activists, at their home in the Providencia district. This married couple disappeared while in the hands of the DINA. Witnesses saw them at Villa Grimaldi. Cecilia Gabriela Castro had also been seen previously at the José Domingo Cañas site. The Commission is convinced that the disappearance of this couple was the work of government agents who thus violated their human rights.

          On November 19, 1974, Fernando Abrahan VALENZUELA RIVERA, a lawyer who was a member of the MIR central committee, was killed. His death was connected to the arrest of the husband and wife Carlos Rodríguez and Cecilia Castro. In the account provided by officials, as security agents were on Calle Santa Filomena in Santiago in an operation aimed at arresting Valenzuela, he drew out a pistol and shot at them, and they fired back and killed him. The Commission has come to the conviction that that account is untrue. Neighbors say that as he was walking down the street an individual shouted at him to halt. He turned around and they immediately shot him with a burst of automatic weapons fire and killed him. Hence the Commission believes that he suffered a human rights violation inasmuch as he was executed by government agents without any due process of law.

          On November 18, 1974, the MIR activist Diana Frida ARON SVIGILISKI was arrested in the street in the Ñuñoa district. While being arrested she received a bullet wound. In December 1974 the DINA arrested Diana Frida Aron's commonlaw husband. At Villa Grimaldi he learned that she had been there, and had been transferred to the DINA clinic on Calle Santa Lucfa. This evidence has been corroborated by other evidence that the Commission has received. Taken together it is sufficient to enable it to come to the conviction that Diana Aron disappeared at the hands of the DINA in violation of her human rights.

          On November 22, 1974, agents of the naval intelligence service arrested the MIR activist José Alberto SALAZAR AGUILERA on the streets of Viña del Mar. A person arrested with him was subsequently released. Many witnesses saw him being held prisoner at the Silva Palma garrison of the navy. There is also evidence that he was later turned over to the DINA. Given the uncertainty over which agency last held José Alberto Salazar in its power, the Commission believes that it can only come to the conviction that his disappearance was the work of government agents in violation of his human rights, but it cannot state which agency was responsible.

          On November 25, 1974, DINA agents arrested the MIR activist Ruben David ARROLLO PADILLA on the streets of Santiago. The next day agents twice came to his house, once bringing him along and the other time searching the area. Even though there is no exact evidence on the detention sites where he may have been held, the Commission regards the evidence of his arrest to be sufficient to enable it to come to the conviction that Ruben David Arrollo disappeared as a result of DINA activity and in violation of his human rights.


a)Winter [July-August]: In certain parts of the text reference is made to winter, summer, fall or spring. It is important to note that Chile is in the Southern Hemisphere, and therefore seasons are opposite to those in the Northern Hemisphere. In most cases an editor's clarification is made in brackets immediately following a seasonal reference.


Back to top ]

Posted by USIP Library on: October 4 2002
Source: Report of the Chilean National Commission on Truth and Reconciliation
(Notre Dame, Indiana: University of Notre Dame Press, 1993), vol. II/II, Part Three, Chapter Two (A.2.b.1.1), 525-541.

Note: Digitized and posted by permission of the University of Notre Dame Press, February 22, 2000.

 


Library Homepage  |   Collections  |   Digital Library Project  |   Peace Agreements  |   Truth Commissions  |   Oral Histories  |   Regional Resources  |   Topical Resources  |   Online Journals  |   Online Research Papers  |   Foreign Ministries  |   International Organizations  |   Research Centers  |   Search Engines  |   Contact the Library


Home  |  Jobs  |  FAQs   |  Contact Us  |  Directions  |  Privacy Policy  |  Site Map


United States Institute of Peace  --  1200 17th Street NW  -- Washington, DC 20036
(202) 457-1700 (phone)  --  (202) 429-6063 (fax)
Send Feedback