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 Day 1: Marquis Phillips Shiraz 2002

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T O P I C     R E V I E W
Joe Dressner This was tasted blind. I assumed it was a malted or beverage bought at a fast food joint, but sensed some alcohol. I feared this was a stumper, but in fact it was the real thing!

Marquis Phillips Shiraz 2002!

Oodles of manufactured fruit with no resemblance to anything that grows on a vine, bush or tree. But there's plenty of it. Gobs of it.

92 Points on the Malted Alcoholic Beverage Scale (MABS)

Tomorrow (Saturday) will be Day 2.

Please feel free to join me as I drink Marquis Phillips Shiraz 2002 for the next 59 days.

Edited by - Joe Dressner on 09/12/2003 23:28:35

Futornick Sounds hedonistic! I'm sure it must be tasted to be believed!

Thanks for the note!

Bill!
!

Chris Coad Not to sound overly suspicious, but by any chance do you have some kind of financial connection with this wine?

Zul pile it on!!!

---------------

Florere Aude

claude kolm Hic!!!

Claude Kolm
The Fine Wine Review

Jeff Connell You must be some kind of real big shot in the wine world to be able to get a 59-day supply of Marquis Phillips Shiraz 2002!

Joe Dressner I'm on good terms with the New York distributor.
Zul
quote:
Hic!!!

Claude Kolm
The Fine Wine Review


eh... you know... sometimes quotations from the Squires' BB don't work here as expected or wished...

pile it on!!! [ Matthew Raney]

---------------

Florere Aude

claude kolm Shouldn't that be pour it on?

Claude Kolm
The Fine Wine Review

Zul enquiring minds want to know...

on what?...

---------------

Florere Aude

claude kolm Waffles?

Claude Kolm
The Fine Wine Review

Chris Coad
quote:
sometimes quotations from the Squires' BB

Is that what all this is about? Something from another board?

What is this "Squires BB," anyway? URL?


Zul
quote:
Waffles?

Claude Kolm
The Fine Wine Review


I can go with that, but first I want to check out the nutrition facts of Marquis Phillips Shiraz 2002.

btw, does this wine have an appellation on the label or it's just "Marquis Phillips", like Brazilian soccer players who don't have a last name but only a first name or a nickname?

you know, in today's wine business faber semper certus est, terra vinea nunquam !

---------------

Florere Aude

SFJoe I've just had my first taste of this "wine."

It's exquisitely nasty. I don't think I've ever had anything quite like it, but maybe I don't get out enough.

You're right, Joe, it's very hard to figure out where the flavors come from. It tastes kind of like a cocktail.

I bought this months ago from CSW, but they refused over and over again to deliver it to me. "Oh, we have that for you, but we forgot to put it in with your delivery...." "Oh, yes, I saw that bottle downstairs, we'll be sure to send it to you...." And so on, for a very long while. At first, I think they thought my interest insincere. But then, I think they were shielding me.

It was the right thing to do. This thing has a mouthcoating nastiness to it, and I've gotta say it, an endless finish. I'm screaming for mercy, but the flavors persist.

Isn't there a bit of a sense of licking an ashtray about the texture? The stewed "fruit" is something else, too. Compote.


Brrrrrrrrrrrr. What a creation this is. I believe in supporting my brother chemists, but this may be going too far.

SFJoe
quote:
btw, does this wine have an appellation on the label

South Eastern Australia, it says. And who would claim that falsely?

Chris Coad Weren't you at Sweet Melissa's when Dressner inflicted it on all of us?

SFJoe Sweet Melissa I or II? (Aren't they numbered like Super Bowls?)

I only went to the Ith one, and I have no recollection of this wine. Of course, we stayed out rather late and it's entirely possible that certain anecdotes involving Amsterdam drove this from my mind. But I doubt it.

Jay Miller
quote:
Sweet Melissa I or II? (Aren't they numbered like Super Bowls?)


It was at Sweet Melissa II. You were out of town that day.

Chris Coad Hm, I guess that was SMII, and it seems you must've been off moving and shaking. But yes, freakyass stuff.

SFJoe Ah, I remember my regret as I boarded a flight at JFK at just about the time the party was warming up. Grim, the things I miss whilst out moving and shaking.
SFJoe In related news, the 1996 Cote Doree from the Domaine L'Aigueliere is remarkably dull tonight. The bankers used to go gaga for this in its yout (that's like youth, but with an outer borough accent), but its fruit is fading, there's still some wood, and it's curiously thin. Of course, it's entirely possible that Sparky and Dan have burned my palate beyond recognition or function. I'll have to try this again after I get some work done.
SFJoe And the Ridge 1990 York Creek Petite Sirah isn't doing much for me.

Is the palate damage permanent?

SFJoe And by the by, do we know how they do the things they do?

Does anyone know specifically what you do to generate a bottle like this? What techniques, applied how? I don't want a generic allusion to enzymes and etc., I want specifics. This "wine" is an amazing achievement, and I'd love to know how it's done.

Lee Short Wow.

I saw the thread title and assumed that Fatboy's Festive Favorites had come early this year...then I saw "SFJoe" in the author field.

Sipping some awfully nice Drappier NV Brut Nature (Zero Dosage). All of $25 (delivered, FJI).

Chris Coad
quote:
Does anyone know specifically what you do to generate a bottle like this? What techniques, applied how? I don't want a generic allusion to enzymes and etc., I want specifics. This "wine" is an amazing achievement, and I'd love to know how it's done.

My guesses aside, I'd assume this is a carefully guarded trade secret, along the line of the recipe for Coke or the 13 secret herbs and spices in KFC.

Nathan Smyth  
quote:
Does anyone know specifically what you do to generate a bottle like this? What techniques, applied how? I don't want a generic allusion to enzymes and etc., I want specifics. This "wine" is an amazing achievement, and I'd love to know how it's done.

I don't know whether it's true or not, but I heard that Sparky does some weird stuff with the irrigation - he lets the vines suffer the drought, then he opens the flood gates and saturates them with water a day or two before harvest.

PS: What did you open to celebrate Ann Coulter's 43rd Birthday?
 

Chris Coad "Vines"?

Nathan Smyth  
quote:
"Vines"?

Isn't that what you call the thingamabobs that the grapes are attached to?
 

Chris Coad "Grapes"?

I'm not sure we're talking about the same wine.

Eden Mylunsch If I recall correctly (yes, there was a time when I knew about such things)(and even cared about them), Sparky worked with Richard Smart and did quite a bit of research on the way that leaf temperature affected the vines. He'd use sensors to monitor the temps and would adjust the drip irrigation levels accordingly in order to prevent the vine from shutting down in the intense heat. The vines would remain stressed throughout the growing season but would receive just enough water and nutrients to maintain the fruit quality (kind of like S&M for grapevines, with Sparky as the dominator). This also enabled Sparky to harvest good quantities (3-5 tons per acre) of ripe fruit from third-leaf vines and improve the quality of fruit grown in the River Murray region, where the average yields are usually in the 15+ ton per acre level. At even 2/3rds of those yields, his must turned out much more concentrated and complex than anything else from the region.

The grapes were harvested in small lots and would then be put into barrel and entered into a matrix that Sarah devised. This would enable her to keep track of the evolution of each barrel via regular tasting through all of them. After awhile, the decision would be made as to a particular barrel's final disposition...depending upon the appelation, a barrel could be used for any of a number of labels (or pricepoints within labels) that were necessary. Thus they could release a single vineyard wine if appropriate or they could use some really good wine to enhance the quality of some not-so-good wine. Sarah has a gift for blending wine of diverse styles and quality into a wine that is consistant vintage to vintage (she'll do well working for the Krug Aussie Sparkling Shiraz venture, assuming those rumors about Veuve's attempt at diversification via international market alliances turn out to be true).

I have no doubt that Sarah and Sparky Marquis have access to and do/will use whatever spoofilization technology is available to them if they think it will help them make better wine. It will be interesting to see what will shake out with the M-P wines since the falling out between the project's partners. I've heard that a lot of lawyers made a lot of money and that the Marquis' are no longer involved with the label at this time. Despite the fact that I don't drink much that falls under that style of wine these days, Sarah and Sparky Marquis are nice folks who, if given the opportunity, could probably make a decent bottle of wine without the influence of too much technology.

-Eden (you may not realize this, but the appelation of "Southeast Australia" covers territory roughly the size of the land included in the Louisiana Purchase)

SFJoe Very interesting, Eden, thanks.

Why do bad things happen to good people? Or why do such famously nice people make such gawdawful wine? Even if it's the best thing ever seen on the block.

The appellation did sound rather generic. The wine wasn't singing "Southeastern Australia" to me as I sipped it.

Whew, what an experience.

Eden Mylunsch
quote:
Why do bad things happen to good people?

Are you referring to your ordeal of drinking the MP wine or to the fact that Sarah and Sparky are such nice people yet they make such an improbable beverage?

If it's the former, it probably has to do with your "devil-may-care", "grab-for-all-the-gusto-in-life" personality, where you prefer to experience things yourself rather than have them filtered through the pens (and gullets) of critics.

Should it be the latter, it's a situation where they're both just scientists who happen to be working in the wine industry. They get to use chemistry, biology and all sorts of agricultural skills to develop new methods to create wine. Maybe if they'd met while they were students at say, Cancer Prevention Tech, or Mechanical Engineering University they'd have found cures for horrible diseases or designed a better tractor or done something else equally as beneficial for humanity. However, that moment in time's possibility has passed and they met in winemaking school. They seem to be as passionate about the wines they create as we are about drinking the wacky French stuff that we like, so what the hell... to paraphrase something I read on a wineboard once, "let at least four or five flowers bloom" (a thousand might cause hay fever).

-Eden (drinking Marzemino in the morning)

SFJoe If only they'd turned their evil genius to good, you say?

As for me, I make no public claims to my deserts. Wants, itches, ids, yes. Merits, nah. I'll take mercy over justice every time, as my saintly Jesuit uncle used to say.

SFJoe An old colleague happened to sit next to me at the bar at Veritas the other night. He told me, in his simple unaffected way, that he was branching out a bit now, but that when he first started going there that he only drank Marquis Phillips. Some numbered cuvee, and he drank it so much that the staff referred to him as #9, or whatever it was.

Of course, he is a healthcare services banker.

SFJoe
quote:

Of course, he is a healthcare services banker.

I ran into the same guy last night, still as jovial as ever, though he's grown a beard for extra jollity.

He was drinking a $150 Napa Cab that was severely oaky (was it "Bressler"?), and generously insisted upon sharing. Later in the evening, he thrust the wine list at me, demanding that I order a French wine that he might actually like.

Not so easy, when you think about it. I struggled, but came up with 2001 Pegau Cuvee Reservee.

He thought it a bit thin and angular.

So there you are.

Brad Kane "Not so easy, when you think about it. I struggled, but came up with 2001 Pegau Cuvee Reservee.

He thought it a bit thin and angular"

Dang. That's a terrific wine.

SFJoe Just shows you how tastes vary.

I'm just guessing, but I think he missed the wood most.

claude kolm
quote:
Just shows you how tastes vary.

I'm just guessing, but I think he missed the wood most.


Should've gone with a Rolland wine -- they'll work every time.

Claude Kolm
www.finewinereview.com

SFJoe
quote:
Should've gone with a Rolland wine -- they'll work every time.


Easy for you to say--I knew he'd pour me a taste.
SFJoe Although if anyone needs an example of how taste, and "scores" vary among individuals and between populations, it would be hard to pick a more provocative example.
Chris Coad Are you insinuating that "scores" are just a popular delusion, like tulips or Pauly Shore?

SFJoe
quote:
Are you insinuating that "scores" are just a popular delusion, like tulips or Pauly Shore?


Who is "Pauly Shore"?

But no, they are not an inductive popular manifestation, they are an imposed error from those who would seek to be "above." Crowds don't spontaneously apply univariate scalars to wines.

I had a dinner party for non-geeks last week that has been mentioned elsewhere. There was a significant group that preferred 2000 Monte Bello to the 1999. No one reading these words would share that view, I can promise. But they had an extended opportunity to compare and consider the two wines, with no one telling them what to think.

They also had the chance to try a Ganevat savignin with a great Gruyere. Whatever score they had in mind for the wine in the glass moved substantially once they tried it with the cheese.


Edited by - SFJoe on 04/12/2007 00:16:42

Chris Coad Preferring the '00 Monte Bello to the '99 at this point doesn't seem a stretch to me, especially for nongeeks. The '00 is softer, looser, lighter, friendlier young. The '99 is a bruiser, tannic and rough-edged. Pauly Shore it ain't.


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