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PEAKCHE OF KOREA AND THE ORIGIN OF YAMATO JAPAN


First published 1994
by Kudara International
Global Building 12th Floor
708-8, Yeoksam-dong
Kangnam-ku, Seoul 135-080, KOREA

Mailing Address
Kudara International
P. O. Box 162, Kwanak
Seoul 151-600, KOREA
Fax: (82-2) 876-0357



ISBN: 89-85567-02-0 (93910) Cloth $40.00



Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data

Paekche of Korea and the Origin
of Yamato Japan/Wontack Hong
Seoul: Kudara International, 1994.
p. : cm

Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN 89-85567-02-0 93910



1. History Japan I. Wontack Hong
II. Paekche of Korea and the Origin of Yamato Japan
K: 913. 022 D: 952. 01

All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reprinted or
reproduced without permission in writing from the publisher.




TABLE OF CONTENTS




FOREWORD -1-



Chapter One
INTRODUCTION


1. The Objective of This Study -9-

2. Japanese Beliefs about the Korea-Japan Relationship -15-

3. The Writings of Western Scholars on Early Japan -21-




Chapter Two THEORIES ON THE FORMATION OF YAMATO WA:
THE MODEL BUILDING OF PROTOHISTORIC JAPAN


1. The Sudden Massive Influx of Continental Culture in the Late Fourth Century -31-

Egami's Theory of the Horseriders' Invasion -The
Archeological Approach


2. The Starting Point of Yamato Wa -45-

Homuda-wake (Ojin), the Founder -The Textual Approach


3. The Massive Inflow of Paekche People in the Fifth Century -53-

If Yamato Wa Was Established without Any Relation to
Paekche, Then There is No Way to Explain Such a Massive
Movement -A Cultural Anthropological Approach


4. Leaders of the Invasion Force -61-

Mimaki-Iri-Biko (Sujin), Puyeo Warriors or the Paekche
Royal Family -The Evolution of the Egami-Ledyard-Hong
Propositions


5. The Origin of the Yamato Imperial Clan -69-

Examining the Register of Imperial Families and Tracing
Their Origin to the Paekche Royal Family


6. The Conquest of Japan and the Creation of Yamato Wa by the Paekche People -75-

A Reconstruction with Recorded Materials




Chapter Three PAEKCHE AND YAMATO WA:
CHECKING THE CONSISTENCY OF THE MODEL


1. The Origins of Japanese Mythology on the Yamato Imperial Clan -97-

2. The Close Kinship between the Paekche Royal Family and the Yamato Imperial Clan: The Emotive Records -105-

3. Continued Inflows from Paekche in the Sixth and Seventh Centuries -117-

The Movement of Culture and Technology from Paekche to Wa


4. The Paekche System of Government -131-

Uji-Kabane and Be Systems


5. The Paekche Culture in the Asuka Japan -153-

The Most Visible and Dominating Influences


6. Korea during the Age of Sosa no wo, Mimaki-Iri-Biko and Himiko -169-

7. Korea during the Age of the Yamato Imperial Clan -183-




Chapter Four HISTORY AND INTERPRETATIONS:
INTERPRETING THE FACTS WITHIN THE MODEL



1. King Kwanggaet'o's Stele -195-

The Paekche Get Help from Their Brother State, Yamato Wa


2. The Mimana Question -205-

Paekche-Kaya-Wa Alliances and the Port of Passage


3. The Divinity of the Japanese Imperial Family -221-

Defensive Actions Taken by the Imperial Clan after the Fall
of the Paekche in Korea and the Eventual Degeneration into
Symbolic Sovereign Status





Chapter Five BACKGROUND MATERIALS



1. Sosa no wo from Silla -229-

A Prehistoric Yayoi Ruler


2. Mimaki-Iri-Biko from Kaya -233-

Another Prehistoric Yayoi Ruler


3. Queen Himiko As Recorded in the Wei Chronicle -239-

A Protohistoric Yayoi Ruler


4. The Seven-Branched Sword -251-

A Gift from a Paekche King to a King of Wa


5. Five Kings of Wa -255-

Protohistoric Yamato Rulers in Chinese Chronicles


6. The Ojin Line of the Paekche Royal Family -259-

Interruptions and Recoveries




Chapter Six SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION



1. What This Study Has Attempted -265-

2. Understanding the Hidden Motives of Kojiki and Nihongi -266-

3. An Alternative Historical Perspective -270-




REFERENCES -275-

REFERENCES IN JAPANESE TEXTS -283-

CHRONICLES OF THE CHINESE DYNASTIES -284-

ANCIENT HISTORIC TABLES -287-

INDEX -305-


ABBREVIATIONS

KC: The translation of the KOJIKI by
Basil Hall Chamberlain.
KP: The translation of the KOJIKI by
Donald L. Philippi.
NI: The First of two volumes of the translation
of NIHONGI by William George Aston.
NII: The Second of two volumes of the translation
of NIHONGI by William George Aston.
KEJ: Kodansha Encyclopedia of Japan.
CCI: ñéÏÐïáÞÈðÈàØîî, æ»ñÉìé
CCII: ñéÏÐïáÞÈðÈàØîî, æ»ñÉì£
JCC: ñéÏÐïáÞȪÎͯÓÛìíÜâÑÀÖâ





ROMANIZATION


The system of romainzation used in this book is the Pinyin system for Chinese words and names, the Hepburn system for Japanese, and the unified system for Korean (that was agreed upon by South and North Korea in June 1992 under the auspices of ISO). A few Korean names are given familiar spellings that are still found in many English language publications.