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artificial respiration

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breathing induced by some manipulative technique when natural respiration has ceased or is faltering. Such techniques, if applied quickly and properly, can prevent some deaths from drowning, choking, strangulation, suffocation, carbon monoxide poisoning, and electric shock. Resuscitation by inducing artificial respiration consists chiefly of two actions: …


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More from Britannica on "artificial respiration"...
23 Encyclopædia Britannica articles, from the full 32 volume encyclopedia
>artificial respiration
breathing induced by some manipulative technique when natural respiration has ceased or is faltering. Such techniques, if applied quickly and properly, can prevent some deaths from drowning, choking, strangulation, suffocation, carbon monoxide poisoning, and electric shock. Resuscitation by inducing artificial respiration consists chiefly of two actions: (1) establishing ...
>Sharpey-Schafer, Sir Edward Albert
English physiologist and inventor of the prone-pressure method (Schafer method) of artificial respiration adopted by the Royal Life Saving Society.
>Piglia, Ricardo
Argentine writer and critic best known for his introduction of hard-boiled fiction to the Argentine public.
>Defining death
   from the transplant article
Transplantation has obviously raised important ethical considerations concerning the diagnosis of death of potential donors, and, particularly, how far resuscitation should be continued. Every effort must be made to restore the heartbeat to someone who has had a sudden cardiac arrest or breathing to someone who cannot breathe. Artificial respiration and massage of the ...
>cardiopulmonary resuscitation
emergency procedure for providing artificial respiration and blood circulation when normal breathing and circulation have stopped, usually as a result of trauma such as heart attack or drowning. CPR buys time for the trauma victim by supplying life-sustaining oxygen to the brain and other vital organs until fully equipped emergency medical personnel arrive on the scene.

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3 Student Encyclopedia Britannica articles, specially written for elementary and high school students
Finding Quotations, Facts, and Statistics
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“Who said that?” is a question that is constantly asked, and a large group of quotation books provides the answers. The best of them are miracles of organization, constructed so that whatever the approach may be—author, subject, or quotation—the answer is easy to find. Whether it is a “rose is a rose is a rose” or a “rose by any other name,” the author's name and the ...
shock
In physiology, shock is a failure of the circulatory system to supply enough blood to peripheral body tissues to maintain their functions. Shock is usually caused by hemorrhage or severe infection. Symptoms include a weak, rapid pulse; low blood pressure; and cold, clammy skin. When shock is severe or prolonged, the lack of adequate blood supply can damage the brain and ...
Treatment.
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A first-degree burn is treated with a topical ointment to keep the injured area from drying out and cracking as it heals. These burns take a week to ten days to heal and seldom leave a scar.