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Australasian New Car Assessment Program (ANCAP)
 

ANCAP is currently developing a new website. In the interim, this page provides summaries of recent results and background information.

What is ANCAP?

The Australasian New Car Assessment Program (ANCAP) gives consumers consistent information on the level of occupant protection provided by vehicles in serious front and side crashes.

The program is supported by Australian and New Zealand automobile clubs, the State government road and transport authorities of NSW, Victoria, South Australia, Queensland, Tasmania and Western Australia, the New Zealand Government and the FIA Foundation.

Recent Results

November 2006 Release

Vehicle ANCAP Score Pedestrian
Score

Lexus IS250 2005 onwards (front, side and head airbags)

Mercedes B-Class 2006 on (front, side and head airbags)

Subaru Tribeca 2006 on (front, side and head airbags)

 

Mazda3 2006 onwards
(front, side and head airbags)

Land Rover Discovery 2006 onwards (front, side and head airbags)

Nissan Maxima 2006 on
(front, side and head airbags)

Kia Carnival 2006 onwards
(front, side and head airbags)

Honda Odyssey 2006 on
(front, side and head airbags)

Holden Viva 2005 onwards
(front, side and head airbags)

Mitsubishi Colt 2006 onwards
(dual front airbags)

August 2006 Release

Click here to download the latest ANCAP brochure

June 2006 Release

Vehicle ANCAP Score Pedestrian
Score

Alfa Romeo 159 2006 onwards (front, side and head airbags)

Peugeot 407 Coupe 2006 onwards (front, side and head airbags)

Renault Megane CC 2004 onwards (front, side and head airbags)

Mitsubishi 380 2005 onwards
(front and side airbags)

Citroen C3 2003 onwards
(front and side airbags)

Nissan Pathfinder 2006 onwards (front, side and head airbags)

Ford Territory TS 2006 onwards (dual front, side and curtain airbags)

Not tested

Toyota Yaris 2005 onwards
(dual front airbags)

Holden Barina Dec 2005 onwards (dual front airbags)

March 2006 Release - Commercial Utilities

Vehicle ANCAP
Score
Pedestrian
Score

Toyota Hilux 4x2 2005 onwards
(dual front airbags)

Not tested

Toyota Hilux 4x4 2005 onwards
(dual front airbags)

Ford Falcon Utility (BA) 2002 onwards (driver airbag)

Not tested

Holden Rodeo 4x2 2004 onwards (dual front airbags)

Not tested

Holden Rodeo 4x4 2004 onwards (dual front airbags)

Mazda Bravo/Ford Courier 4x4 1999 onwards (no airbags)

Mitsubishi Triton 4x2 2002 onwards (no airbags)

Not tested


September 2005 Release - 4WDs

Click here to download the September 2005 brochure


July 2004 Release

Click here to download the July 2004 brochure


Background Information

About the Tests

Each vehicle model tested in ANCAP is subjected to an offset crash test into a barrier, a side impact test and a pedestrian impact test. A pole test is optional. The vehicles purchased for the test program were typical of those vehicles available to new car purchasers.

The offset frontal crash test simulates colliding with another vehicle.
In this test, 40% of the car, on the driver’s side, initially makes contact with a crushable aluminium barrier at 64km/h.

The side impact test consists of running a 950kg trolley into the driver’s side of the test vehicle at 50km/h. The trolley has a crushable aluminium face to simulate the front of another vehicle.

A pole test is an optional extra test, available at the manufacturer’s cost, if the vehicle performs very well in the side impact test and is fitted with head protecting side airbags. The vehicle impacts a steel pole lined up with the driver’s head, at 29km/h sideways.

About the Pedestrian Impact Tests

Pedestrian Impact tests are also carried out, which estimate head and leg injuries to pedestrians struck by the test vehicle travelling at 40 km/h. The results from this test are listed in the ratings below. Pedestrian impacts represent 18 percent of the fatal road crashes in Australia and New Zealand.

Test Results

To simplify the crash test results and the pedestrian impact results, ANCAP has assigned an occupant rating and a pedestrian rating in stars to each vehicle model. The occupant rating considers the injury measures to the head, neck, chest, abdomen, pelvis, upper and lower legs and the deformation of the vehicle’s structure. The star rating assigned on the basis of the crash test results combines offset and side impact results and includes any additional points awarded in circumstances where advanced seatbelt reminders are fitted or where the optional pole test was conducted. The pedestrian rating considers the injury measures to the head, upper legs, knees and lower legs when struck by a vehicle travelling at 40km/h.

Making Comparisons

ANCAP results are intended to be used to compare the crash protection provided by vehicles in severe crashes.

Occupants of heavier vehicles in real-world two-vehicle crashes typically fare better than people in lighter vehicles. This is why crash test results shouldn’t be compared among vehicles with large weight differences. In many single vehicle crashes, weight offers no safety advantage.

ANCAP Members click here

 

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