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ALUMNI HALL OF FAME MEMBERS

Since 1995, the Maryland Alumni Association has inducted distinguished alumni in the Alumni Hall of Fame in a ceremony that occurs once every five years. Each of the 51 Hall of Fame members has given something to society—educating, entertaining, serving and defending us. Their efforts reflect back on their alma mater and show the world what it means to be a Terp.

CARMEN BALTHROP
B.M. 1971
ARTS & HUMANITIES
INDUCTED APRIL 22, 1995

Critics have described soprano Carmen Balthrop’s voice as "pure silver." She debuted with the Metropolitan Opera as Pamina in Die Zauberflote by Mozart, and has performed throughout North America, Europe, Russia and the Far East. A national advocate for the arts, she has even sung an aria for the U.S. Senate. Not only does Balthrop give voice to a world of beautiful music, she shares her expertise as both teacher and mentor to aspiring vocalists at the University of Maryland where, as associate professor of voice, she has taught master classes for over a decade.

ADISAI BODHARAMIK
Ph.D. 1971
ENGINEERING
INDUCTED JUNE 10, 2000

With his doctorate in hand, Adisai Bodharamik set about creating several telecommunications companies in his native Thailand during the 1970s. In 1982, he consolidated his various enterprises under the name Jasmine International Group. His leadership role in the telecommunications industry served as a springboard to public service in the Thai government where he has held numerous ministerial positions. Bodharamik has been a special lecturer at Chulalongkorn University and King Mongkut Institute of Technology in Bangkok, as well as at the University of Maryland. In 1995, the Maryland Alumni Association named him Outstanding International Alumnus of the Year.


WALDO H. BURNSIDE
B.S. 1949
BUSINESS
INDUCTED JUNE 10, 2000

After graduating from Maryland in 1949, Waldo Burnside joined Woodward & Lothrop’s— "Woodies"—in Washington, D.C. Over 30 years with the legendary retailer, he rose to president and CEO. In the late 1980s, while running West Coast retailer Carter Hawley Hale in Los Angeles, Burnside directed the California-based bank, Security Pacific. He retired in 1991 but continues to be a leading member of the business community. An active alumnus, he created the Regents and Banneker/Key Scholarships at Maryland, was president of the Terrapin Club and director of the Maryland Education Foundation. Burnside has served as a trustee of the University of Maryland, College Park Foundation.

HARRY CLIFTON "CURLEY" BYRD
B.S. 1908
AGRICULTURE
INDUCTED APRIL 22, 1995

"Curley" Byrd entered Maryland in 1905 as an engineering student. His 43-year professional career at the university began as a two-week coaching stint in 1911 and concluded with an 18-year presidency, ending in 1954. Byrd was Maryland’s athletic director until becoming its president in 1935. Under his leadership, the university became one of the largest in the country, both in size and student population. Among Byrd’s many legacies: the campus’ handsome red brick Georgian structures, an innovative American studies program and the world-wide educational extension program, University College. Byrd Stadium is a reminder of his impact on athletics and the university.

ROBERT F. CHANDLER, JR.
Ph.D. 1934, D.Sc. (HONORARY) 1975
AGRICULTURE & NATURAL RESOURCES
INDUCTED JUNE 10, 2000

During the Green Revolution of the 1960s and 1970s, world food production increased sub-stantially thanks, in part, to Robert Chandler. In 1954, after a prestigious career in academia and four years as president of the University of New Hampshire, Chandler joined the Rockefeller Foundation, researching ways to increase global agricultural output. He helped establish the International Rice Research Institute in the Philippines in 1959 and led a team of scientists in developing new varieties of rice that tripled harvests. Chandler received the 1988 World Food Prize—just one of his many awards—that recognizes major contributions to the science of food production.

CONNIE CHUNG
B.S. 1969
JOURNALISM
INDUCTION JUNE 4, 2005

In 1969, Connie Chung started writing the news at Washington, D.C.’s, WTTG-TV before becoming an on-screen reporter. Chung left her hometown station to cover national politics for Walter Cronkite’s evening broadcast on CBS. In 1976, she became an anchor on KNXT-TV, Los Angeles. Since 1983, Chung has served as anchor on three different networks, covering many of the most gripping stories and interviewing the leading newsmakers of our times. The first Chinese American and only the second woman to anchor a major network news program, Chung has received three Emmys, a Peabody Award and four honorary doctorates.

A. JAMES CLARK
B.S. 1950, Ph.D. (Honorary) ’92
ENGINEERING
INDUCTED APRIL 22, 1995

A. James Clark began as a field engineer with the Washington-based George Hyman Construction Company in 1950. By 1969, he was president and CEO—by 1987, chairman of the board. He transformed the small regional construction firm into one of America’s largest building contractors: The Clark Construction Group, Inc. (CCG), builder of more than 20 university buildings, Washington, D.C.’s, L’Enfant Plaza, Baltimore’s Camden Yards and New York’s Lincoln Center. Clark, a former member of the university’s Board of Regents, has generously contributed time and record-breaking financial resources to his alma mater. The A. James Clark School of Engineering is named in his honor.

THE HONORABLE WILLIAM P. COLE, JR.
B.S. 1910
ENGINEERING
INDUCTED APRIL 22, 1995

After graduation from Maryland, William P. Cole studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1912. He served as an infantry officer in World War I before returning to legal practice in Towson, Md. Cole was elected to the U.S. Congress in 1927, serving until 1929, then again from 1931 to 1942, when he was appointed to a U.S. Customs Court judgeship. In 1952, he moved to the Customs and Patent Appeals Courts in New York. Cole spent 25 years on the university’s Board of Regents—12 as board president—beginning in 1931. The Cole Student Activities Building was named in his honor in 1955.

THE HONORABLE MARY STALLINGS COLEMAN
B.A. 1935, LL.D. (HONORARY) 1978
ARTS & HUMANITIES
INDUCTED APRIL 22, 1995

As an undergraduate, Mary Stallings Coleman was the university’s first Miss Maryland, singled out for her community service. As a Michigan judge, she served 12 years on the Probate and Juvenile Court, drafting legislation that created the state’s Children’s Protective Services and Office of Youth Services. Coleman was elected Michigan’s first female supreme court justice in 1972 and its first female chief justice in 1979. A member of the Michigan Women’s Hall of Fame inaugural class, she received the Champion of Justice Award from the state’s bar association in 1993.

LAWRENCE G. DAVID
B.A. 1970
ARTS & HUMANITIES
INDUCTION JUNE 4, 2005

Four years after graduating with a history degree, Larry David began his stand-up comedy career, developing a reputation as the "comic’s comic" on stage, while building an extensive list of credits on the big and small screen. Between 1979 and 1982, he served as writer and actor on the late-night sitcom Fridays. In 1984 he wrote for Saturday Night Live. Between 1983 and 1987, David appeared in several films including Woody Allen’s Radio Days. In 1988, he teamed with Jerry Seinfeld to create the hit sitcom Seinfeld, earning two Emmy awards. Today, David plays himself in HBO’s critically acclaimed, Curb Your Enthusiasm.

RAYMOND DAVIS, JR.
B.S. 1937, M.S. 1940
LIFE SCIENCES
INDUCTION JUNE 4, 2005

Raymond Davis served with the U.S. Army Air Corps during World War II and spent two years in private industry before joining the Brookhaven National Laboratories in 1948. He built the first neutrino detector in 1963 and began the research that earned him a 2002 Nobel Prize in Physics. Retiring from Brookhaven after 36 years, he joined the faculty at the University of Pennsylvania in 1984 as a research professor of physics and astronomy. Davis, a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, received the 2000 Wolf Prize in Physics and the 2001 National Medal of Science.

RUTH M. DAVIS
M.A. 1952, Ph.D. 1955
COMPUTER, MATHEMATICAL & PHYSICAL SCIENCES
INDUCTED JUNE 10, 2000

Ruth Davis, one of the first women to receive a doctorate in mathematics from Maryland, helped design some of the earliest computers and satellites. She went on to serve in the federal government as deputy undersecretary of defense for research and advanced technology, assistant secretary of energy for resource applications and the first director of the National Center for Biomedical Communications in the Department of Health, Education and Welfare. In 1981, Davis founded her own technology management company. A member of Maryland’s Board of Visitors from 1989 to 1994, Davis endowed the Ruth M. Davis Professorship in Mathematics in 2003.

LEONARD J. ELMORE
B.A. 1978
ARTS & HUMANITIES
INDUCTED JUNE 10, 2000

Many remember Len Elmore for his rebound records in the 1973-1974 college basketball season. The first at Maryland to complete 1,000 rebounds in a career, Elmore played for the All-ACC team three times and the 1974 All-American team. That same year, the Indiana Pacers selected him in the first round of the NBA draft. Elmore retired in 1984, after 10 stellar years in the league. In 1987, while working as a sports commentator for ESPN, he received his law degree from Harvard University. Lawyer, businessman, commentator and active alumnus, Elmore was the university’s winter commencement speaker in 1997, the year he was inducted into Maryland Athletics’ Hall of Fame.

GEARY FRANCIS "SWEDE" EPPLEY
B.S. 1920, M.S. 1926
AGRICULTURE
INDUCTED APRIL 22, 1995

Geary "Swede" Eppley arrived as a Maryland freshman in 1914. After a hiatus to serve as a cavalry lieutenant in World War I, he finished his degree and became assistant professor of agronomy in 1922. An undergraduate track and football star, Eppley later coached Maryland’s track team to two national championships. Both director and faculty chairman of athletics, he helped found the Atlantic Coast Conference and was its first president. Recalled to duty in World War II, Eppley earned the Legion of Merit. He ended his 42-year career at Maryland in 1964 as dean of men and director of student activities.

NORMAN "BOOMER" J. ESIASON
B.G.S. 1984
UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES
INDUCTED JUNE 10, 2000

Norman "Boomer" Esiason presided over a golden era in Terrapin Football, leading his team to the ACC title and the Citrus Bowl in 1983. An All-American quarterback, Esiason set 17 school records for passing and total offense. He spent 14 years with the NFL, earning the league’s 1988 Most Valuable Player award and taking the Cincinnati Bengals to Super Bowl XXIII. After retiring, he served as a commentator for several networks. When his son was diagnosed with cystic fibrosis in 1993, he founded the Boomer Esiason Foundation to raise awareness of the disease and support research for its cure.

JOHN "JACK" E. FABER, JR.
B.S. 1926, M.S. 1927, Ph.D. 1937
LIFE SCIENCES
INDUCTED POST-HUMOUSLY JUNE 10, 2000

Jack Faber left his mark on the University of Maryland as head of the Department of Microbiology and head lacrosse coach. Faber coached the team for 33 years beginning in 1928. He lead the Terps to nine national championships, eight ACC titles and 249 victories. In 1942, he joined the U.S. Army, returning to Maryland in 1945 to launch a 15-year tenure as head of the Department of Microbiology. After retiring in 1963, Faber continued to support his alma matter. In 1992, he received the Ralph J. Tyser Medallion for his exemplary volunteer service to the university and the alumni association.

CHARLES L. FEFFERMAN
B.S. 1966, D.Sc. (HONORARY) 1979
COMPUTER, MATHEMATICAL & PHYSICAL SCIENCES
INDUCTED APRIL 22, 1995

Charles Fefferman, a child prodigy, graduated with honors from Maryland at age 17, taking degrees in math and physics. Three years later, he earned his doctorate from Princeton University. At 22, he was named full professor at the University of Chicago—the youngest in that institution—s history. He returned to Princeton in 1974 and in 1978, he became the youngest recipient of the prestigious Fields Prize, mathematics’ equivalent of the Nobel. Today, Fefferman is the Herbert E. Jones, Jr. Professor of Mathematics at Princeton. He lectures and publishes extensively on topics previously considered too difficult to be understood at this stage in the development of mathematics.

CARLETON S. FIORINA
M.B.A. 1980
BUSINESS
INDUCTION JUNE 4, 2005

Carly Fiorina earned an undergraduate degree in medieval history and philosophy, spent a semester in law school and taught English in Italy before coming to the University of Maryland for her M.B.A. She worked as an executive for AT&T and Lucent Technologies, joining Hewlett-Packard as president and CEO in 1999—the first outsider and the first woman to head the company. Fiorina has served on the New York Stock Exchange Executive Board and has advocated for the development of impoverished regions around the globe, winning the "Seeds of Hope" Award in 2003. In 2004, she was nominated to the U.S. Space Commission.

ROBERT E. FISCHELL
M.S. 1953, D.Sc. (HONORARY) 1996
COMPUTER, MATHEMATICAL & PHYSICAL SCIENCES
INDUCTED JUNE 10, 2000

Robert Fischell is a pioneer of medical technology. He worked at the U.S. Ordnance Lab while earning his masters in physics from Maryland. After applying his research into long-lasting spacecraft batteries to those in pacemakers, Fischell became interested in inventing medical devices. He invented the rechargeable cardiac pacemaker and the implantable insulin pump, which functions as an artificial pancreas. This creation earned him the U.S. Inventor of the Year Award in 1984. He went on to develop the BX Velocity Stent, a device that helps to prevent blocked arteries. Today Fischell holds some 200 U.S. and international patents.

JON D. FRANKLIN
B.S. 1970
JOURNALISM
INDUCTION JUNE 4, 2005

Jon Franklin served in the U.S. Navy between 1959 and 1967 as a staff writer for All Hands Magazine. Afterward, he took a job at the Prince George’s Post and enrolled at Maryland, where he earned his journalism degree with honors in 1970. He then joined the Baltimore Evening Sun as science writer, winning two Pulitzer Prizes—his first in 1979 and another in 1985. Franklin has headed Oregon State University’s Department of Journalism and the University of Oregon’s creative nonfiction and creative writing programs. Today, he is the Philip Merrill Professor of Journalism in the Philip Merrill College of Journalism at Maryland.

HERBERT A. HAUPTMAN
Ph.D 1955, D.Sc. (HONORARY) 1985
COMPUTER, MATHEMATICAL & PHYSICAL SCIENCES
INDUCTED APRIL 22, 1995

While earning his doctorate in mathematics, Herbert Hauptman began a 33-year career at the Naval Research Laboratory, working with physical chemist Jerome Karle to develop a method of determining the three-dimensional shapes of molecules. By solving a problem that had perplexed chemists for 40 years, the pair enabled researchers to design new drugs for heart disease, cancer and high blood pressure. For their work, they won the 1985 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Hauptman is the only non-chemist—and the first Maryland alumnus—to receive the prize. Today, he is president of the Hauptman-Woodward Medical Research Institute, Inc. and research professor at SUNY Buffalo.

JIM HENSON
B.S. 1960, D.F.A. (HONORARY) 1978
ARTS & HUMANITIES
INDUCTED APRIL 22, 1995

Jim Henson introduced Washington, D.C., to "muppets" (his amalgam of marionette and puppet) on WRC-TV’s "Sam and Friends" in 1955 during his freshman year at Maryland. In the decades after graduation, Henson’s creations performed for a global audience on television’s Sesame Street, The Muppet Show, and in three feature films. His creations include Bert and Ernie, Big Bird, Oscar the Grouch, Miss Piggy and Kermit the Frog, whose likeness has joined Henson’s on a statue located in front of the Stamp Student Union. The statue is a gift of the classes of 1994, 1998 and 1999.

THE HONORABLE STENY H. HOYER
B.S. 1963, D.P.S. (HONORARY) 1988
BEHAVIORAL & SOCIAL SCIENCES
INDUCTED APRIL 22, 1995

Steny Hoyer was elected to the Maryland Senate in 1966 at the age of 27, and became the youngest Senate president in state history at 35. In 1981, Hoyer was elected to the U.S. Congress, and in 2002 became the House Democratic Whip, making him the highest-ranking Member of Congress from Maryland in history. He was the lead House sponsor of the landmark Americans With Disabilities Act in 1990 and the Help America Vote Act in 2002. He served on the University System of Maryland Board of Regents from 1999 to 2003, where he was a champion on UMCP's behalf.

THE HONORABLE HARRY R. HUGHES
B.S. 1949, D.P.S. (HONORARY) 1987
BUSINESS
INDUCTED JUNE 10, 2000

Harry Hughes, the 57th governor of Maryland, served two terms between 1979 and 1987, leaving a record of progress in social reform, environmental protection and fiscal responsibility. Under his administration, Maryland launched a program to save the Chesapeake Bay and led the nation in efforts against drunk driving. Capital investment by new and expanding businesses averaged $1 billion a year, while unemployment remained below the national average. Hughes balanced the state’s budget while launching the greatest tax-relief program in Maryland’s recent history. He also appointed more women and minority citizens to the judiciary and key government posts than any previous governor.

CARLISLE H. HUMELSINE
B.A. 1937
EDUCATION
INDUCTED APRIL 22, 1995

During World War II, Carlisle Humelsine reached the rank of full colonel at 29, earning the Distinguished Service Medal and the Bronze Star. Following the war, he spent six years at the State Department, serving four secretaries of state including Dean Acheson and John Foster Dulles. In 1958, he began a 27-year tenure as president, then chairman, of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. Under his leadership, Williamsburg became one of America’s most popular historical attractions. Humelsine was chairman of the National Trust for Historic Preservation; and a trustee for the National Geographic Society, the National Gallery and the Smithsonian Institution.

HUGH NEWELL JACOBSEN
B.A. 1951, D.F.A. (Honorary) 1993
ARTS & HUMANITIES, ARCHITECTURE
INDUCTED June 10, 2000

Since starting his own architecture firm in 1958, Hugh Newell Jacobsen has earned more than 110 awards for design excellence. Jacobsen has built commercial and institutional structures in countries around the world, including the American University in Cairo, Egypt; an addition to the U.S. Capitol; and the American embassies in Paris and Moscow. In 2000, Architectural Digest named him one of the world’s top 100 architects. Jacobsen is perhaps best known for his modern homes that abstract traditional styles. The prolific architect has built some 400 houses during his career, including a campus home for Maryland alumni: the Samuel Riggs IV Alumni Center.

ALBIN O. KUHN
B.S. 1938, M.S. 1939, Ph.D. 1948
AGRICULTURE & NATURAL RESOURCES
INDUCTED JUNE 10, 2000

Thanks in large part to Albin Kuhn, the University of Maryland System has thriving campuses in Baltimore City and County. In 1965, Kuhn was appointed vice president at both locations then chancellor, serving at Baltimore County through 1971 and at the city campuses through 1979. During that time, he constructed new buildings to provide more space for teaching and research. Kuhn went on to become executive vice president of the University System of Maryland in 1979, retiring in 1982. That year, UMBC named the Albin O. Kuhn Library and Gallery in honor of his career-long devotion to the University of Maryland System.

WILBUR MONROE (MUNRO) LEAF
B.A. 1927
ARTS & HUMANITIES
INDUCTED April 22, 1995

Munro Leaf, author and illustrator of dozens of children’s books, is best remembered for his signature character, Ferdinand, the Spanish bull who preferred smelling flowers to fighting in a ring in Spain. Composed in less than an hour one Sunday afternoon in 1935, the book sparked controversy. With the Spanish Civil War raging, political critics charged that it was a satirical attack on aggression. In Germany, the book was burned; in India, Ghandi called it his favorite. Even today, Ferdinand continues to charm children around the world—the story has been translated into over 60 languages.

GEORGE J. LAURER
B.S. 1951
ENGINEERING
INDUCTED JUNE 10, 2000

After graduating from Maryland in 1951, George Laurer joined IBM as a junior engineer and worked up the ranks to senior engineer. In 1969, he returned to the technical side of engineering and was later assigned the monumental task of designing a code and symbol for product identification for the Uniform Grocery Product Code Council. His solution—the Universal Product Code—radically changed the retail world. Since then, he has enhanced the code by adding a 13th digit. Laurer retired from IBM in 1987. He holds some 25 patents and is a member of the university’s A. James Clark School of Engineering Hall of Fame.

SAMUEL J. LeFRAK
B.S. 1940, D.P.S. (HONORARY) 1990
BUSINESS
INDUCTED APRIL 22, 1995

As chairman of The LeFrak Organization, Samuel LeFrak presided over one of the world’s largest private building firms. Its development projects include New York’s LeFrak City, Battery Park City, Gateway Plaza and the $10 billion Newport City Complex in New Jersey—one of the world’s largest planned communities. His company also pursues global gas and oil exploration, international financing, publishing and entertainment. LeFrak counseled all levels of government, foreign and domestic, on urban planning and housing tech-nology issues. He received many awards for his work, including knighthood, the John F. Kennedy Peace Award and numerous honorary doctorates.

LIZ A. LERMAN
B.A. 1970
ARTS & HUMANITIES
INDUCTION JUNE 4, 2005

Before arriving at Maryland in the late 1960s, Liz Lerman attended Bennington College and Brandeis University. In College Park, she found the inspiration for her future in dance. Lerman has operated the Liz Lerman Dance Exchange, first as a school of dance, then as a traveling company. In many performances, she invites young and old, experienced and novice to express themselves through movement. Lerman has received commissions from the Kennedy Center, Lincoln Center and BalletMet. For her work, she has earned a MacArthur fellowship, an American Choreographer Award and the American Jewish Congress’ "Golda" award, among many others.

KATHLEEN S. MAGEE
M.E.D. 1972
EDUCATION
INDUCTED JUNE 10, 2000

In 1981, Kathleen Magee, a nurse and clinical social worker, and her husband joined a group of medical volunteers in the Philippines. While there, they encountered hundreds of children with dental disfigurements. Upon their return to the United States, the Magees solicited monetary and medical supply donations. By 1982, they founded Operation Smile, an organization that funds and performs oral surgery. Since then, Operation Smile has helped thousands around the world. In 1996, Magee helped to open the first burn unit in Nablus, West Bank. Kathleen Magee assists in more than half of the international surgical missions each
year, bringing smiles wherever she goes.

MANNING MARABLE
Ph.D. 1976
ARTS & HUMANITIES
INDUCTION JUNE 4, 2005

In May 1973 while working on his Ph.D. in American history, Manning Marable won the Gewher Award for the Department of History’s best graduate paper. That award foreshadowed countless others that he would earn while defining the black experience in America, from the slave trade era to the latest election cycle. Marable has been a professor of public affairs, political science and history at Columbia University and a lecturer for the Sing Sing Prison Inmates’ Master’s Degree Program. He has raised awareness of issues related to civil, prisoners’ and labor rights through his nationally syndicated column, "Along the Color Line," first published in 1976.

RUSSELL E. MARKER
B.S. 1923, D.Sc. (HONORARY) 1987
LIFE SCIENCES
INDUCTION JUNE 4, 2005

In 1925, Russell Marker went to work for the Ethyl Corporation and invented the octane rating system, still used for reducing "pinging" in car engines. He moved to the Rockefeller Institute before joining the Penn State University faculty in 1934. Through his university research, and later studies in Mexico, Marker found that hormones used in cortisone and other steroid drugs could be produced efficiently from yams. By exploiting these natural compounds, he introduced us to inexpensive arthritis and kidney treatments as well as the birth control pill. Syntex, Marker’s pharmaceutical company, is still one of the world’s largest drug producers.

TOBIN J. MARKS
B.S. 1966
LIFE SCIENCES
INDUCTION JUNE 4, 2005

Tobin Marks, the Vladimir N. Ipatieff Professor of Catalytic Chemistry, has been teaching at Northwestern University since 1970. His research has been used in the development of new plastics and the improvement of high-speed data transmission. Though his mailing address has been in Illinois, Marks has held named lectureships and visiting professorships at universities from British Columbia to Israel. A member of the National Academy of Sciences and a Fellow in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, he has registered nearly 70 patents. Marks earned the American Institute of Chemists’ Gold Medal in 2002.

THE HONORABLE THOMAS V. "MIKE" MILLER, JR.
B.S. 1964
BUSINESS
INDUCTION JUNE 4, 2005

Mike Miller has been serving the people of Prince George’s County in Annapolis since 1970 as a member of the House of Delegates and the state senate. He has held the Senate presidency since 1987—the longest tenure in Maryland history. Miller is a member of the national, state and local bar associations. He has won the Bulger Award for Outstanding Legislator in the United States and Johns Hopkins University’s William P. Coliton Community Service Award for Excellence. In 2001, the Senate named the new Thomas V. "Mike" Miller Jr. Senate Building in his honor.

PARREN J. MITCHELL
M.A. 1952
BEHAVIORAL & SOCIAL SCIENCES
INDUCTED APRIL 22, 1995

Parren Mitchell has spent a lifetime battling inequities. In 1950, at age 27, he forced the university to end its policy of segregation and admit him as a graduate student in sociology. Later, in 1970, he became the first African American elected to the U.S. Congress from Maryland, serving six terms and chairing the Congressional Black Caucus. He was director of the Baltimore City Community Action Agency, a part of President Johnson’s War on Poverty. Since 1980, Mitchell has chaired the Washington, D.C.-based Minority Business Enterprise Legal Defense and Education Fund that he founded to protect minority businesses against discrimination.

RENALDO NEHEMIAH
B.A. 1981
ARTS & HUMANITIES
INDUCTION JUNE 4, 2005

Renaldo Nehemiah is known around the world for his record-setting track and field performances and his years with the Super Bowl Champion San Francisco 49ers. In 1978, he set a world record that still stands today inthe 55-meter hurdles. Between 1978 and 1982, he was the world’s No. 1 high hurdler—the first to break 13 seconds in the 110-meter event, running a 12.93 in 1981. In 1982, Nehemiah became a wide-receiver for San Francisco, winning the 1986 Jim Thorpe Award for excellence in two or more sports. He was inducted into the National Track and Field Hall of Fame in 1997 and the Maryland Athletics’ Hall of Fame in 1998.

THOMAS R. NORRIS
B.S. 1967
BEHAVIORAL & SOCIAL SCIENCES
INDUCTION JUNE 4, 2005

As a lieutenant in the U.S. Navy’s elite SEAL commando unit during the Vietnam War, Tom Norris—a 1965 and 1966 ACC Champion wrestler—took his five-man team deep into enemy territory in search of two downed Air Force fliers. Finding only one, he set out the next day, dressed as a Vietnamese fisherman. He located his charge that night and brought him home, despite a fierce firefight with enemy troops. He earned the Congressional Medal of Honor for his bravery. Later, Norris was wounded in action and endured six years of surgery before launching a 20-year career with the FBI.

MICHAEL OLMERT
B.A. 1962, Ph.D. 1980
ARTS & HUMANITIES
INDUCTION JUNE 4, 2005

Michael Olmert holds degrees in medieval literature, but his research examines everything from prehistoric man to British colonialism and from architecture to Einstein. He has written and produced for screen and stage while spending years as a lecturer in Maryland’s Department of English. In every case, his many endeavors have brought critical acclaim. Two of his Discovery Channel documentaries have won Emmy Awards, television’s highest tribute. He has also been recognized by organizations like the American Bar Association and the Phi Kappa Phi honor society. When he’s not writing or conducting classes on campus, Olmert can be found giving public lectures or guiding tours of various European countries.

JANE CAHILL PFEIFFER
B.A. 1954, Litt.D. (HONORARY) 1979
ARTS & HUMANITIES
INDUCTED APRIL 22, 1995

Jane Cahill Pfeiffer, a student of speech and dramatic arts at Maryland, joined IBM in 1955 as a systems engineering trainee. She rose through management, serving as IBM’s vice president of communications before becoming an independent consultant to educational institutions and private companies two decades later. Pfeiffer was the first female recipient of a prestigious White House Fellowship in 1966. In 1978, NBC named her as
its chairman of the board. Pfeiffer returned to consulting in organization management, communications and government relations in 1980.

JUDITH A. RESNIK
Ph.D. 1977
ENGINEERING
INDUCTED April 22, 1995

Judith Resnik joined America’s astronaut program in 1978, a year after receiving her doctorate in electrical engineering from Maryland.Previously, she had worked as an engineer at RCA and the Xerox Corporation and studied the physiology of human sight at the National Institutes of Health. Resnik became America’s second female astronaut in space in 1984. She contributed to the space program through experimental software development and work on the shuttle’s remote manipulator system. In 1986, Resnik and six crewmates died aboard the space shuttle Challenger. To honor her pioneering spirit, the university established the Judith A. Resnik Memorial Scholarship and Fellowship Endowment.

CHUN-SHAN SHEN
Ph.D. 1961
COMPUTER, MATHEMATICAL & PHYSICAL SCIENCES
INDUCTED APRIL 22, 1995

Chun-Shan Shen, president of the Maryland Alumni Association’s first international chapter, arrived at the university from Taiwan in 1957 to pursue a doctorate in physics. After graduation, he held positions at NASA, Princeton University and Purdue University, before returning to Taiwan in 1971 to become a professor of physics and later president at the National Tsing-Hua University. As a minister in the Taiwanese cabinet, Shen has played a major role in modernizing Taiwan’s science and technology infrastructure. He also implemented political reforms aimed at improving relations with mainland China while serving on the Central Election Commission and the National Unification Council.

WILLIAM WOOLFORD SKINNER
B.S. 1895
AGRICULTURE
INDUCTED April 22, 1995

William Woolford Skinner launched a 40-year career at the U.S. Department of Agriculture by investigating the mineral makeup of underground and surface waters at the Arizona Experiment Station in 1904. He retired as chief of the department’s Bureau of Agricultural and Industrial Chemistry. One of the first to study the impact of agricultural chemicals on water quality, Skinner chaired a committee studying the effects of pollution on the Potomac River’s and Chesapeake Bay’s oyster production in 1910. The university gave him an honorary doctorate in 1917. Skinner served on the Board of Regents from 1923 to 1941, seven of those years as chair.

ROBERT H. SMITH
B.S. 1950
BUSINESS
INDUCTION JUNE 4, 2005

Through his professional and philanthropic activities, Robert H. Smith has created vibrant communities spanning two states and the nation’s capital. After graduation, Smith began working with his father’s business, the Charles E. Smith Companies, where he now serves as chairman of the Commercial and Residential Realty divisions. Tapping into the rapid growth in Northern Virginia, Smith led the development of Crystal City. He has served as a trustee of multiple institutions including the National Gallery of Art and the National Portrait Gallery. In 1998, Smith endowed and placed his name on Maryland’s business school, renewing his commitment to the university with a record-breaking gift in 2005.

ADELE HAGNER STAMP
M.A. 1924
BEHAVIORAL & SOCIAL SCIENCES
INDUCTED April 22, 1995

Adele Hagner Stamp began as Maryland’s first dean of women in 1922. Her one-year appointment stretched to 38. During that time, Stamp watched female enrollment grow from 93 to 4,000. She started the first women’s student government organization, the Mortar Board Society and a branch of the American Association of University Women while serving as teacher, counselor, philosopher, administrator and role model for countless coeds. When Stamp retired, the Board of Regents granted her emeritus rank, making her the first woman to receive this faculty honor. The student union was renamed for her in 1974 in recognition of her achievements.

REGINALD VAN TRUMP TRUITT
B.S. 1914, M.S. 1922
ARTS & SCIENCES
INDUCTED APRIL 22, 1995

Reginald Van Trump Truitt, was the founder and first director of the university’s Chesapeake Biological Laboratory. A leading naturalist, marine biologist and Maryland faculty member, he began investigations into issues affecting the bay during the 1920s, calling attention to its mismanaged resources long before environmentalism became popular. Later, he helped establish regional marine laboratories in states on the East and West Coasts. Following retirement in 1954, Truitt led the campaign to convert Assateague Island into a National Seashore. He was awarded Maryland’s Rachel Carson Award in 1981 for his efforts to preserve the Chesapeake Bay and its environment.

MILLARD E. TYDINGS
B.S. 1910
ENGINEERING
INDUCTED April 22, 1995

Millard E. Tydings enlisted in World War I as a private and rose to Lieutenant Colonel, earning the Distinguished Service Cross and the Distinguished Service Medal. In 1920, while speaker of the Maryland House of Delegates, he introduced legislation merging the Maryland Agricultural College with the professional schools in Baltimore, creating the modern University of Maryland. Later, he would sit on its Board of Regents. From 1923 to 1950, Tydings was one of the U.S. Congress’ most powerful leaders, authoring the Philippine Independence Act and serving as first chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee and on the committee that censured Senator Joseph McCarthy.

EVELYN PASTEUR VALENTINE
M.S. 1967, E.d.D. 1986
HEALTH & HUMAN PERFORMANCE, EDUCATION
INDUCTED JUNE 10, 2000

Evelyn Pasteur Valentine has held nearly every title in the education profession, serving in a variety of roles in Baltimore’s public school system. In 1974, she was elected Maryland’s Teacher of the Year and received a National Teacher of the Year Merit Award. Her doctoral dissertation, a strategic model for education, paved the way for The Pasteur Center for Strategic Management, which Valentine founded in 1987. In 1988, she helped the University System of Maryland manage the formation of the University of Maryland College Park Alumni Association, which honored her with its 1997 Ralph J. Tyser Medallion in recognition of her service to the university and the association.

GARY B. WILLIAMS
B.S. 1968
BUSINESS
INDUCTION JUNE 4, 2005

As an undergraduate business major, Maryland Head Basketball Coach Gary Williams played point guard for the Terps. After graduation in 1968, he coached Woodrow Wilson High School in Camden, N.J., to an undefeated season and a state championship before moving on to American University, Boston College and Ohio State University. In 1989, he returned to Maryland and advanced his team into post-season competition during his inaugural year—a university first. Between the 1993-1994 and 2003-2004 seasons, Williams took the Terps to 11 consecutive NCAA tournaments, winning the 2002 national title and that year’s ACC Coach of the Year Award. In 2004, his Terps won the ACC championship.

MORGAN B. WOOTTEN
B.S. 1956
HEALTH AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE
INDUCTION JUNE 4, 2005

Morgan Wootten began his epic coaching career at St. Joseph’s Home for Boys in Washington, D.C., during the early 1950s. He transferred to the University of Maryland to finish his degree and after graduation in 1956, he became basketball coach at DeMatha High School in Hyattsville, Md. While winning 1,274 games, Wootten’s teams finished No. 1 in Washington, D.C., 20 times—twice they went undefeated. His streak of 42 winning seasons is the longest on record. The Naismith Foundation named him Coach of the Century in 2000, the same year it inducted him into the Basketball Hall of Fame.


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