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Frequently Asked Questions:

 

Question: What is Naturopathic Medicine?

Answer: Naturopathic medicine is a distinct healing science and philosophy that blends traditional natural therapies with current advances in the study of human health. The fundamental philosophy of naturopathic medicine lead to the following goals:

  • to treat the underlying nature or cause of disease, not to just treat symptoms which are viewed as the body's communication with us.

  • to support the natural healing power of the patient

  • to remove obstacles to the healing process

  • to focus on the prevention of disease through education

  • to foster the promotion of good health using not only natural methods but methods that support and enhance a patient’s overall health.

 

Question: Why should I go to a naturopathic physician?

Answer: Patients see me for many reasons. Generally they have a health problem which has not been resolved and/or they are seeking a different more natural approach to their health issues. My goal is to identify the cause of the patient's concern and to treat that cause. I do not want to just suppress symptoms which can drive the problem deeper.

 

Question: How are Naturopathic Physicians trained?

Answer: A licensed naturopathic physician (ND or NMD) attends a four-year graduate level naturopathic medical school after completing a minimum of 3 years undergraduate pre-medical studies. A naturopathic physician is educated in all of the same basic sciences as a M.D. but also studies holistic and nontoxic approaches to therapy with a strong emphasis on disease prevention and optimizing wellness. In addition to a standard medical curriculum, the naturopathic physician is required to complete four years of training in clinical nutrition, oriental medicine, homeopathic medicine, botanical medicine, psychology, and counseling. A naturopathic physician takes rigorous professional board exams prior to being licensed in a jurisdiction that regulates the practice of naturopathic medicine. A licensed ND/NMD belongs to a regulatory body that oversees standards of practice, complaints and discipline. Naturopathic physicians must maintain continuing education and carry malpractice insurance.
 

 

Question: Where may Naturopathic doctor's practice?

Answer: Currently, 14 states, the District of Columbia, two US territories and four Canadian provinces have licensing laws for naturopathic doctors. In these regions, naturopathic doctors are required to graduate from a four-year, residential naturopathic medical school and pass and extensive postdoctoral board examination (NPLEX) in order to receive a license. Licensed naturopathic physicians must fulfill state-mandated continuing education requirements annually, and will have a specific scope of practice defined by their state's law. In many states without licensure, there are naturopathic medical organizations working with legislators to pass licensing laws.  The states, territories and Canadian provinces that currently have licensing laws for naturopathic physicians are: Alaska, Arizona, British Columbia, California, Connecticut, Hawaii, Idaho, Kansas, Maine, Manitoba, Montana, New Hampshire, Ontario, Oregon, Saskatchewan, Utah, Vermont, and Washington. Washington, D.C., Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

 

Question: What diagnostic & treatment services do Naturopathic Physicians provide?
 

Answer: Naturopathic physicians conduct a comprehensive health history. Physical examinations are performed as indicated. The use of standard diagnostic instruments and laboratory tests are utilized to assist in diagnosis making. Specialty examinations and functional testing may also be used for further assessment.   Core naturopathic medical therapies include, nutritional medicine, botanical medicine, homeopathic medicine, traditional Chinese medicine, physical medicine, psychological counseling and preventative medicine. However, many NMD.s provide a variety of other treatments appropriate to their level of training like Heavy Metal Detoxification, Intravenous therapy, Neural Therapy and Facial Rejuvenation.
 

 

Question: Can Naturopathic Doctors prescribe medications?
 

Answer: Naturopathic physicians licensed in Arizona are authorized to prescribe pharmaceutical prescriptions. Although NMD's prefer to use more natural therapies, prescriptions will be made when necessary. Naturopathic doctor's are also able to work with compounding pharmacists to formulate bio-identical hormones and other compounded medications.

 

Question: What types of conditions do Naturopathic Physicians address?

Answer: Most naturopathic physicians address health concerns that cover all aspects of family health from prenatal to geriatric care. Both acute and chronic conditions are routinely treated, however, some naturopathic doctors may have a practice that only focuses on certain conditions. Medical emergencies are referred to the local hospital. Although NMD's do not perform major surgery, they can offer pre and post surgical support to promote healing and recovery.

 

Question: Do Naturopathic Physicians cooperate with other practitioners?

Answer: Naturopathic physicians cooperate with other health care providers and recognize the opportunity co-treatment and open communication can provide. They refer patients to other practitioners for diagnosis or treatment when appropriate and in a patient’s best interest.  Dr. Jeni welcomes working with other health care providers including medical doctors, chiropractors, dentists, massage therapists etc. She believes that an integrated approach to health care is often the most effective.
 

 

Question: What would be a typical office visit with Dr. Jeni?

Answer:
In general, for long standing chronic conditions, the first visit is scheduled for 90 minutes. In advance, you will be asked to fill in a comprehensive intake form, which Dr. Jeni will refer to during the visit. An initial consultation comprises a thorough history taking which includes chief complaints, current signs and symptoms, past medical history, family medical history, diet & lifestyle and a physical examination. A Bio-impedance Analysis will be performed during this first visit. Lab test or other assessments required will be ordered as necessary. The second visit is when Dr. Jeni reviews the collected data and a specific, individualized treatment program is outlined. This visit is scheduled for 30 minutes. Subsequent follow-up appointments are scheduled as needed.
Acute and minor concerns can usually be diagnosed and treated in one visit with follow up visits scheduled as needed.
 

 

Question: Does Insurance cover Naturopathic care and what are the fees?

Answer: Health insurance coverage varies with each insurance company, the patients plan within the company and the naturopathic physician’s affiliation with that company. Fortunately, insurance companies are beginning to realize the savings to health care costs possible with naturopathic medicine, so please inquire with your insurance company about any coverage they might provide. Standard lab tests ordered by a naturopathic doctor in Arizona are usually paid for by an individual's health insurance. Dr Jeni does not process insurance claims, but at your request, she can provide the necessary paperwork for you to submit your expenses to your insurance provider.  At this time, Dr Jeni is pleased to announce her affiliation with United Healthcare's Complementary Care Network and offers a 20% discount on office visits to participants.  For fees, please contact the office for a fee schedule so that you are familiar with the costs of the individual tests and services.
 

 

Question: Is there a difference between the N.D. and the N.M.D. degree?

Answer: Universities and colleges may choose to call the naturopathic degree they confer either the “Doctor of Naturopathy” or the “Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine” degree. These are two different names for the same degree. By either name, the degree is usually abbreviated “N.D.,” but an institution that refers to its naturopathic credential as the “Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine” degree may abbreviate it either “N.D.” or “N.M.D.” Presently, all colleges and universities with accredited or candidate naturopathic medicine programs confer the Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine degree or, in Canada, the Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine diploma. In all states and provinces that regulate naturopathic medicine, except Arizona, naturopathic physicians use the N.D. initials after their names. In Arizona, they may use either the N.D. or N.M.D. initials; the different sets of initials do not indicate a difference in scope of practice, but only a preference by the individual physicians.
 

 

Question: What is the difference between a naturopath and a naturopathic physician?
 

Answer: A naturopath is a term that has been used to sometimes inaccurately refer to a naturopathic physician. In modern times, the term naturopath refers to non-medically trained natural health providers from correspondence/long distance education programs, short term naturopathy schools, and grandfathered in practitioners of varied backgrounds. Typically, naturopaths practice in unlicensed, unregulated jurisdictions and do not have the same training or privileges as that of a naturopathic physician. A licensed naturopathic physician (ND or NMD) attends a four-year graduate level naturopathic medical school after completing a minimum of 3 years undergraduate pre-medical studies. A naturopathic physician is educated in all of the same basic sciences as a M.D. but also studies holistic and nontoxic approaches to therapy with a strong emphasis on disease prevention and optimizing wellness. In addition to a standard medical curriculum, the naturopathic physician is required to complete four years of training in clinical nutrition, oriental medicine, homeopathic medicine, botanical medicine, psychology, and counseling. A naturopathic physician takes rigorous professional board exams prior to being licensed in a jurisdiction that regulates the practice of naturopathic medicine. A licensed ND/NMD belongs to a regulatory body that oversees standards of practice, complaints and discipline. Naturopathic physicians must maintain continuing education and carry malpractice insurance.


Question: What is the difference between a naturopathic doctor and a homeopath?
 

Answer: Naturopathic doctors are generalists in alternative medicine. They receive at least 3-years pre-medical training at university, then 4-years at an accredited naturopathic medical college. They are primary care physicians with the ability to order lab tests and prescribe pharmaceuticals in Arizona. They can choose from a variety of therapies, including homeopath, according to each patient's need.  Homeopaths are considered specialists in alternative medicine. They receive extensive training in homeopathy and would only prescribe a homeopathic medicine to treat their patient.  Homeopaths and naturopathic doctors are licensed as health care practitioners in Arizona.

 

Question: Can you describe what homeopathy is in more detail?
 

Answer: Yes. Homeopathy is a highly systematic, scientific method of therapy that respects the wisdom of the body. It is a method based on the implementation of a pharmacological law called Similars. A German doctor, Samuel Hahnemann first pronounced this law, in 1796. He described it in this manner:
"Any substance which, when given in a strong dose, produces specific symptoms in a healthy person, is likely, if given in a homeopathic [i.e., infinitely small] dose, to cause those same symptoms to disappear in a sick person."
Homeopathic medicine will not result in toxic or allergic side effects. Homeopathy stimulates the body's natural healing mechanisms. Proper nutrition, rest and exercise will enhance its effectiveness.