[ SEC Home ]
the new att
SEC Store SEC Kids SEC Insider Kids College
TV/Radio  Ticket Office  Multimedia  Corporate Sponsors  In The Community  SEC Members  Championships  The SEC 
Multimedia Center SEC Home
  The Standard of Excellence
The Southeastern Conference, with its storied 74-year history of athletic achievements and academic excellence, has built perhaps the greatest tradition of intercollegiate competition of any league in the country since its inception in 1933.

The 2005-06 academic year was another season to remember for the SEC as conference teams captured six national titles and six national runner-up finishes. Since 1990, the SEC has won 113 national team championships for an average of more than six per year.

Arkansas won the conference’s first NCAA title of the year in men’s indoor track & field. Auburn won both the men and women’s swimming & diving titles and Florida won the NCAA men’s basketball championship. Georgia won the NCAA title in women’s gymnastics and Auburn earned the women’s outdoor track and field championship. Florida finished first among Southeastern Conference schools and fourth overall in the Sears Trophy final standings.

Overall, the SEC finished in the top two in 10 of its 20 sponsored sports and in the top five in 16 of the 20 sports. Six SEC teams participated in football postseason bowls with Alabama, Florida and LSU winning the Cotton, Outback and Peach Bowls, respectively. Six men's basketball teams were invited to the NCAA Tournament with Florida winning its first NCAA Men’s Basketball Championship and LSU advancing to the Men’s Final Four. Six women's basketball teams were also invited to the NCAA Tournament with LSU advancing to the Women’s Final Four. An NCAA-high eight teams advanced to postseason play in baseball with Georgia advancing to the College World Series. With 159 teams advancing to NCAA postseason competition, the SEC continued to solidify its place as the nation's premier conference.

In addition to the six team championships, 71 SEC student-athletes garnered individual national championships, while 460 individuals were awarded with first-team All-America honors. Student-athletes around the league continued to excel in the classroom as well with 2,120 earning recognition on the SEC Academic Honor Roll.

On the national all-sport level, the SEC placed nine teams in the top 50 of the Sears/NACDA Director's Cup rankings. Florida led the league with a fifth place finish. Georgia placed ninth, while Tennessee was 14th, LSU finished 20th, Alabama 21st, Auburn 25th, Arkansas 28th, Kentucky 33rd and South Carolina finished 43rd to round out the league's top 50 finishes. Vanderbilt (64) and Ole Miss (75) also finished in the top 100 of the Sears Cup Standings.
A brief sport-by-sport summary of the 2003-04 year follows. Simply click on the desired sport for its description.
  Click Here to View all Descriptions    
Baseball
Georgia advanced to the College World Series, finishing tied for seventh in Omaha. The SEC earned eight NCAA Tournament selections (Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Kentucky, Ole Miss, Mississippi State, South Carolina and Vanderbilt). Four teams advanced to the Super Regionals with Georgia advancing to the CWS. An SEC squad has now appeared in the College World Series 21 of the last 22 years. Ole Miss won the SEC tournament title, 9-3, over Vanderbilt. Alabama and Kentucky shared the SEC regular-season title with 20-10 conference records. Kentucky’s Ryan Strieby was named SEC Player of the Year by the league’s coaches, while Arkansas’ Nick Schmidt was the SEC Pitcher of the Year. Alabama’s Emeel Saleem earned SEC Scholar Athlete of the Year honors and Vanderbilt’s Pedro Alvarez was the SEC Freshman of the Year. Kentucky skipper John Cohen was the unanimous selection as SEC Coach of the Year.
Men's Basketball
Florida won the SEC’s ninth NCAA Men’s Basketball Championship with a 73-57 victory over UCLA. The SEC sent six teams to the NCAA Tournament in 2006, including Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Kentucky, LSU and Tennessee. South Carolina won its second straight NIT Championship and Vanderbilt also participated in the NIT. The 2006 NCAA Tournament marked the 17th straight year the SEC had at least one team advance to the Sweet 16. Florida and LSU both advanced to the Final Four. The SEC ended the 2006 regular season with LSU winning the SEC Championship with a 14-2 mark in league play. Florida won their second straight SEC Tournament. LSU’s John Brady won SEC Coach of the Year honors. LSU’s Glen Davis was tabbed the SEC Player of the Year and Florida’s Lee Humphrey earned the SEC Scholar-Athlete of the Year award. LSU’s Tyrus Thomas won SEC Freshman of the Year honors and shared the SEC Defensive Player of the Year award with Florida’s Corey Brewer. Arkansas’ Eric Ferguson was the SEC’s Sixth Man of the Year.
Women's Basketball
The SEC had six teams earn bids to the NCAA Tournament with LSU advancing to the national semifinals for the third straight year. It was the 13th time in 14 seasons the SEC was represented at the Women’s Final Four. LSU’s Seimone Augustus was named SEC Player of the Year for the second straight season. Mickie DeMoss of Kentucky garnered SEC Coach of the Year honors, while Tennessee’s Candace Parker was the SEC Freshman of the Year. Florida’s Sara Lowe was the Scholar-Athlete of the Year, Georgia’s Sherill Baker earned Defensive Player of the Year and Vanderbilt’s Liz Sherwood was the SEC Sixth Woman of the Year. LSU claimed the league title with 13-1 SEC record, while Tennessee won the SEC Tournament title.
Men's Cross Country
Arkansas finished second at the NCAA Cross Country Championships in its quest for a fourth national championship in eight years. Alabama finished 21st, Florida 23rd and Tennessee finished 28th in the race. Arkansas’ men captured their 15th straight SEC crown and their amazing 32nd consecutive conference title, dating back to 17 straight Southwest Conference titles prior to joining the SEC in 1991. Arkansas’ John McDonnell was named SEC Male Cross Country Coach of the Year. The award marked McDonnell’s 11th consecutive honor. Josphat Boit of Arkansas garnered Male Cross Country Athlete of the Year honors for the second straight season and Alabama’s Augustus Maiyo was the SEC Freshman of the Year.
Women's Cross Country
Arkansas came in 19th to lead the SEC at the NCAA Championships. Tennessee won their fifth SEC title. Auburn’s Angela Homan won her third straight SEC Female Athlete of the Year award. Tennessee head coach J.J. Clark earned his fifth SEC Female Cross Country Coach of the Year honor and Arkansas’ Christine Kalmer garnered SEC Freshman of the Year honors.
Football
The SEC sent six of its teams to postseason bowl games in 2005-2006. For the 25th straight season, the SEC has recorded the largest total attendance figure of any conference in the nation, with over six million fans attending games in the conference in 2005. Five SEC teams were ranked in the final Top 25 of the USA Today/ESPN poll. Georgia won the SEC Championship game with a 34-14 victory over LSU. LSU led the conference in both polls (6th-AP/5th-USA Today/ESPN). Alabama (8th-AP/8th-USA Today/ESPN), Georgia (10th-AP/10th-USA Today/ESPN), Florida (12th-AP/16th-USA Today/ESPN) and Auburn (14th-AP/14th-USA Today/ESPN) were also ranked. Georgia’s Mark Richt was named SEC Coach of the Year. Jay Cutler garnered SEC Offensive Player of the Year honors. Alabama’s DeMeco Ryans was named the SEC Defensive Player of the Year and LSU’s Rudy Niswanger earned SEC Student-Athlete of the Year honors. Skyler Green of LSU was named SEC Special Teams Player of the Year and Arkansas’ Darren McFadden was named SEC Freshman of the Year. Auburn’s Marcus McNeill was awarded the Jacobs Blocking Trophy.
Men's Golf
Seven SEC Men’s Golf teams advanced to postseason play with five making the NCAA Championships. Florida finished second, Kentucky fifth, Georgia sixth, Auburn was tied for 19th and South Carolina finished tied for 22nd. Alabama and Tennessee also competed in NCAA Regionals. Georgia won the 2006 SEC Men's Golf Championship. Florida’s Brett Stegmaier took home individual medalist honors at the SEC Championships. Georgia’s Chris Haack earned SEC Coach of the Year honors. Chris Kirk of Georgia was named SEC Player of the Year and Alabama’s Joseph Sykora earned the Scholar-Athlete of the Year award. Georgia’s Brian Harman won SEC Freshman of the Year honors.
Women's Golf
Ten SEC Women’s Golf teams advanced to the postseason with seven making the NCAA Championships. Florida and Georgia finished tied for sixth to lead all SEC teams at the NCAA Championship. Arkansas finished 10th, Auburn finished 12th, Tennessee was tied for 13th, LSU finished 23rd and Alabama was 24th. Mississippi State, South Carolina and Vanderbilt all participated in NCAA Regionals, as well. Auburn won the 2006 SEC Women's Golf Championship. Auburn’s Maria Martinez took home individual medalist honors at the SEC Championships. Tennessee’s Judi Pavon was named SEC Coach of the Year. Auburn’s Maria Martinez earned SEC Golfer of the Year honors. South Carolina’s Whitney Simons garnered the SEC Scholar-Athlete of the Year award. Georgia’s Taylor Leon was tabbed SEC Freshman of the Year.
Gymnastics
Georgia posted a score of 197.750 to win their second straight National Championship and seventh overall. Alabama (196.725) finished third, Florida finished fourth, LSU finished eighth and Arkansas was 12th at the Gymnastics Championships. Georgia’s Courtney Kupets won the all-around title, sharing both the uneven bars and balance beam titles. Alabama’s Ashley Miles won the vault title. Georgia won its third consecutive and 15th SEC Championship scoring a 197.275. Auburn’s Julie Dwyer earned SEC Athlete of the Year honors. Georgia’s Courtney Kupets was named SEC Freshman of the Year and Auburn’s Nicole Barnett was named the SEC Scholar Athlete of the Year. Florida head coach Rhonda Faehn was named the SEC Coach of the Year.
Soccer
Four teams, including Florida, Ole Miss, Tennessee and Vanderbilt appeared in the 2005 NCAA Tournament, marking the 39th appearance by SEC teams in the NCAA Tournament. Tennessee lost in the second round to lead all SEC squads and Tennessee won the SEC Tournament. The Lady Vols were also the SEC Champion after posting a 10-1 regular-season mark. Auburn’s Rhonda Brooks was named MVP of the SEC Tournament. Tennessee’s Angela Kelly and Vanderbilt’s Ronnie Hill shared SEC Coach of the Year honors. Georgia’s Ali Williams was named SEC Offensive Player of the Year. Vanderbilt’s Tyler Griffin was named SEC Defensive Player of the Year. Libby Probst of Alabama earned the SEC Scholar-Athlete of the Year award and Jennifer Hance of Ole Miss was the SEC Freshman of the Year.
Softball
Alabama, Auburn, Florida, Georgia, LSU and Tennessee represented the league in the NCAA Tournament with Alabama and Tennessee advancing to the Women’s College World Series and the Lady Vols finishing third. LSU advanced to the Super Regionals of the NCAA Tournament. Alabama was the SEC Regular Season Champion, as Tennessee claimed the SEC Tournament Championship. Alabama’s Patrick Murphy and LSU’s Yvette Girouard were named SEC Co-Coach of the Year. Florida’s Kristen Butler earned SEC Player of the Year honors. Alabama’s Stephanie VanBrakle earned SEC Pitcher of the Year, while teammate Brittany Rogers earned Freshman of the Year honors. South Carolina’s Ashley Smith was tabbed SEC Scholar-Athlete of the Year.
Men's Swimming & Diving
The Auburn men’s swim team won their fourth straight and sixth overall national title at the NCAA Championships. Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky and Tennessee finished in the top 25. Auburn won its 10th straight SEC Championship and 12th in 13 years. Ryan Lochte of Florida was named SEC Men's Swimmer of the Year and Diver of the Year was Georgia’s Chris Colwill, both for the second straight season. Taking home the Men's Freshman Swimmer of the Year award was Bradley Ally of Florida and the SEC Men's Freshman Diver of the Year honor was awarded to Nathan Schreiber of LSU. Alabama’s Vlad Polyakov was also honored as the Scholar-Athlete of the Year. Auburn's David Marsh and Georgia’s Dan Laak earned the men's awards as SEC Swimming and Diving Coach of the Year, respectively.
Women's Swimming & Diving
Auburn won its fourth women’s NCAA Championship in the last five years with 518.5 points. Georgia was second with 515.5 points in the second closest NCAA Championship ever. Georgia’s Kara Lynn Joyce was named SEC Women's Swimmer of the Year while Taryn Ignacio of Kentucky earned Women's Diver of the Year for the second straight season. Jessie Cole of Georgia was tabbed Women's Freshman Swimmer of the Year. Auburn’s Corey Gerlach claimed the corresponding award for a freshman diver. Georgia's Jack Bauerle was named Women's Swimming Coach of the Year and Mike Lyden of Kentucky won Women's Diving Coach of the Year. Florida’s Vipa Bernhardt was honored as the Scholar-Athlete of the Year.
Men's Tennis
Nine SEC teams advanced to NCAA postseason action with three moving onto the round of 16 at the NCAA Men's Tennis Championships. Georgia finished as the National Runner-up to lead all SEC squads. The SEC has had a team in the semifinals in 13 of the last 14 years. Georgia won both the SEC Championship and SEC Tournament titles. Georgia’s Manny Diaz received SEC Coach of the Year honors. Josh Isner of Georgia was tabbed as the SEC Player of the Year, while Bruno Agostinelli of Kentucky was named SEC Freshman of the Year. Ole Miss’ Bran ten berge earned SEC Scholar-Athlete of the Year.
Women's Tennis
Eight SEC teams advanced to NCAA postseason action with three moving onto the round of 16 at the NCAA Women's Tennis Championships. Florida advanced to the national semifinals. Florida won both the SEC Championship and SEC Tournament titles. Florida’s Roland Thornqvist earned SEC Coach of the Year honors. Taka Bertrand of Vanderbilt garnered SEC Player of the Year honors. Ole Miss’ Kseniia Tokarieva and South Carolina’s Gira Schofield were named Co-SEC Freshman of the Year. Alabama’s Ashley Bentley received SEC Scholar-Athlete of the Year.
Men's Indoor Track & Field
Arkansas scored 53 points to clinch their 19th indoor national crown and its 42nd national championship overall. LSU finished off the pace in second with 45 points. Arkansas' claimed its 13th SEC indoor championship in 15 tries since entering the league in 1992. LSU’s Xavier Carter claimed SEC Men's Runner of the Year. Florida’s Mike Morrison was named the SEC Men's Field Event Athlete of the Year, as his gator teammate, Willie Perry, was tabbed as the SEC Men's Freshman Runner of the Year. Arkansas’ Nkosinza Balumbu earned the SEC Men's Freshman Field Event Athlete of the Year, while John McDonnell of Arkansas was named SEC Men's Indoor Track and Field Coach of the Year.
Women's Indoor Track & Field
The SEC had three teams finish in the top 10 at the NCAA Indoor Championships with Georgia finishing fifth, LSU seventh, Auburn eighth and South Carolina in 10th. Georgia won its first SEC Indoor title in school history. Georgia claimed three of the five SEC honors for the season. Jenny Dalhgren was tabbed as the SEC Women's Field Event Athlete of the Year, while teammate Levern Spencer was named SEC Women's Freshman Field Event Athlete of the Year. Georgia’s Wayne Norton was named SEC Women's Indoor Track and Field Coach of the Year. South Carolina’s Shalonda Solomon was named the SEC Women's Runner of the Year and Florida’s Shannon Leinert was tabbed SEC Women's Freshman Runner of the Year.
Men's Outdoor Track & Field
LSU was the National Runner-up at the NCAA Championships, posting 51 points. Arkansas and Tennessee posted top-10 finishes, with the Razorbacks (33 points) taking fifth and the Vols (32 points) sixth. LSU sophomore Xavier Carter was honored in four events on the NCAA Division I Men's Outdoor Track and Field All-America Team and was also named the 2005-06 Roy F. Kramer SEC Male Athlete of the Year. Arkansas scored 137.50 points to win its fourth straight SEC outdoor title. The Razorbacks have claimed 13 SEC Outdoor titles out of 15 since joining the conference in 1991-92.
Women's Outdoor Track & Field
Auburn women's track and field team won its first ever national title at the NCAA Outdoor Track and Field Championships, scoring 57 points. The Tigers posted All-American performances in nine events, including two individual national champions and three second-place finishers, and broke two school records during the four-day event. For Auburn, it was the first-ever national championship in men's or women's track and field. Tiger Coach Ralph Spry was named the NCAA Division I Outdoor Track and Field Coaches of the Year. South Carolina finished third at the NCAA Championships, while LSU and Georgia posted top 10 finishes at seventh and ninth respectively. Georgia claimed the SEC Outdoor title, holding off an Auburn rally to finish one point ahead of the Tigers.
Volleyball
The SEC sent a record-breaking six teams to the NCAA Tournament as Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Kentucky, LSU and Tennessee earned bids tournament berths. It marks the 16th straight year of sending at least two teams to NCAA postseason play. Tennessee fell in its first appearance in the NCAA National Semifinals to Washington 3-0. Florida claimed both the regular-season and tournament championships, as LSU and Arkansas shared the Western Division crown. Florida’s Jane Collymore was named SEC Player of the Year, while Kentucky’s Jenni Casper was named SEC Defensive Player of the Year. LSU’s Marina Skender was tabbed as the SEC Freshman of Year. Kentucky coach Craig Skinner was named the 2005 SEC Women's Volleyball Coach of the Year. Kentucky also claimed the SEC Scholar-Athlete of the Year award with Danielle Wallace earning the award.


  Leadership
  Mike Slive, Commissioner

From his early days as an athletic administrator to his current post as commissioner, Mike Slive has maintained an integral role in the ever-changing world of intercollegiate athletics. He was named the seventh commissioner of the Southeastern Conference on July 2, 2002.

"I am keenly aware that to be the Commissioner of the SEC is both a privilege and a challenge," said Slive at the announcement of his appointment as the SEC Commissioner. "It's a privilege because the SEC is the premier conference in the country - with outstanding academic institutions, unsurpassed winning athletic traditions as well loyal, dedicated and passionate fans, outstanding athletic directors and coaches, and, of course, national championship-caliber student-athletes."

Since becoming SEC Commissioner, Slive has created committees within the SEC that are designed to assist member institutions in the operations of its athletics department as well as how its athletics operations fit within the academic mission of its universities.

Slive was instrumental in the development of the Sportsmanship and Fan Behavior Summit, a national forum held in February 2003, which brought together athletic, community and civic leaders as well as specialists to talk about sportsmanship and how to prevent inappropriate fan behavior.

Slive also has developed an initiative to ensure gender and ethnic diversity in the SEC. For the last three years, the SEC office distributed a database to its institutions containing the names and biographies of every Division I-A and National Football League head and assistant coach.

The SEC Task Force on Compliance and Enforcement issued its first report to the league at the 2004 SEC Spring Meetings. The task force has developed policies and procedures to assist league schools in NCAA & SEC compliance and enforcement matters.

The creation of the SEC Academic Consortium, an effort to increase academic cooperation across the league by linking the resources of the dozen universities in the SEC, was announced earlier this year.

In 2002-03, Slive served on the Commission of Athletic Opportunity, set up by the U.S. Secretary of Education to review the workings of Title IX. He was one of 15 panelists that consisted of former and current athletes, athletic and academic administrators and college professors from around the nation.

As Commissioner of the SEC, Slive has been instrumental in the operations of the Bowl Championship Series.

Since his arrival in Birmingham, Slive has not passed up many opportunities to speak to community, civic and business groups about the positive attributes of intercollegiate athletics and the SEC.

Prior to joining the SEC, Slive was the Commissioner of Conference USA. He was named the first-ever Commissioner of the newly-formed league on April 24, 1995. Under his direction, Conference USA has quickly emerged as one of the nation's top conferences.

Slive served as chair of the first NCAA Infractions Appeals Committe and is presently on the National Letter of Intent Steering Committee and chair of the Board of Directors of NCAA Football USA. He served as president of the Collegiate Commissioners Association (CCA) from 2001-03 and was also on the NCAA Management Council from 1997-2004. He is on the Executive Committee of the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics (NACDA) and also serves on the Board of Advisors of the Marquette Sports Law Institute. He begins his second year on the NCAA Men’s Basketball Committee.

The 65-year old Slive has also served on the Board of Directors of the Sports Lawyers Association from 1997-2001 and was chair of the Division I-A Commissioners from 1999-2001. He also was a member of the NCAA Division I Working Group to Study Basketball Issues in 1998-99.

Slive has an extensive administrative and legal background in intercollegiate athletics. He served as commissioner of the Great Midwest Conference since its formation in 1991, and played a pivotal role in the Great Midwest becoming one of the most successful and exciting conferences in the nation in the 1990's.

His previous athletic administrative experiences include: assistant director of athletics at Dartmouth College (1968-69), assistant Executive Director of the Pacific-10 Conference (1979-81), and Director of Athletics at Cornell University (1981-83), prior to developing his sports practice specializing in representing colleges and universities in athletic-related matters.

A native of Utica, N.Y., Slive was senior partner and founder of the Mike Slive-Mike Glazier Sports Group. Prior to the formation of the Slive-Glazier Sports Group in 1990, Slive was a partner in the Chicago law firm of Coffield Ungaretti Harris & Slavin. He operated his own practice in Hanover, N.H., and served as judge of the Hanover District Court from 1972-77.

Slive graduated from Dartmouth College with a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1962. He earned a Juris Doctor from the University of Virginia Law School in 1965 and an LLM from the Georgetown University Law Center in 1966.

Slive and his wife, Elizabeth, are the parents of a daughter, Anna.

Member Institutions
Service/Education/Commitment
National Prominence
SEC Office Staff
Compliance
Fall Sports
Winter Sports
Spring Sports
The SEC Student-Athlete Experience
Academic Consortium
Task Force Report on Compliance and Enforcement
December 8 and 9, 1932
At the annual Southern Conference meeting in Knoxville, Tenn., the 13 members west and south of the Appalachian Mountains reorganized as the Southeastern Conference.
November 30, 1933
Alabama defeats Vanderbilt 7-0 to finish 5-0-1 in the conference and capture the SEC's first football title.
August 21, 1940
Martin S. Conner, former governor of Mississippi, takes office as the first commissioner of the SEC in Jackson, Miss.
February 21, 1948
Former LSU coach Bernie H. Moore appointed the SEC's second commissioner and conference office moves to Birmingham, Ala.
October 20, 1951
The Alabama-Tennessee football game, played at Birmingham's Legion Field, becomes the first televised event in SEC history.
April 1, 1966
A.M. (Tonto) Coleman succeeds Moore as the conference's third commissioner.
August 1, 1972
Dr. H. Boyd McWhorter becomes the league's fourth commissioner.
July, 1983
The SEC signs agreement with the Turner Broadcasting System to begin airing a "Game of the Week" beginning in the fall of 1984.
September 1, 1984
Women's athletics come under the auspice of the SEC.
September 15, 1986
Dr. Harvey W. Schiller succeeds McWhorter as SEC Commissioner.
January 10, 1990
Roy F. Kramer becomes the conference's sixth commissioner.
May 31, 1990
SEC presidents unanimously recommend that the commissioner be authorized to enter discussions with interested institutions for the purpose of expansion.
August 1, 1990
Arkansas accepts invitation to become the SEC's 11th member.
September 25, 1990
South Carolina accepts invitation to become 12th member of the SEC.
November 29, 1990
SEC presidents announce divisions and vote to adopt an eight-game football schedule to begin in 1992.
February 27, 1992
SEC signs agreement with Jefferson Pilot Sports to televise SEC football games annually through the 1995 season. On November 7, 1994, the League extended its agreement with JP Sports through the 2000 season.
April 15, 1992
ABC Sports announces a four-year contract to nationally televise the SEC Football Championship Game. On October 13, 1994, ABC extended its agreement with the conference to televise the Championship Game through 2000.
December 5, 1992
SEC hosts the nation's first Division IA conference football championship game at Legion Field. Alabama defeats Florida 28-21 to win the 1992 SEC crown and the league's USF&G Sugar Bowl berth.
Febuary 11, 1994
SEC announces multi-sport television agreement with CBS Sports to televise SEC football (1996-2000), men's basketball and women's basketball (1994-95 through 2000-2001).
February 2, 1998
SEC announces it has reached a multi-year extension with CBS Sports to broadcast its football and men's and women's basketball games, beginning in 2001. In the new agreement, CBS will expand its current SEC football commitment and provide exclusive national network broadcasts of SEC home games and its basketball coverage will continue to expand nationally.
June 7, 1999
SEC announces it has reached a multi-year extension with ESPN to televise football and men's and women's basketball for the next eight years. The agreement calls for ESPN/ESPN2 coverage of up to 18 football games per year as well as up to 20 men's and up to six women's basketball games and up to three additional women's sports annually.
March 12, 2002
Roy Kramer announces his retirement as the SEC's sixth commissioner. During his tenure, the league won 85 national championships and the league distributed more than $654 million back to its member institutions.
May 31, 2002
SEC announces it will distribute a league-record $95.7 million back to the 12 member institutions under the 2001-2002 revenue sharing plans.
August 1, 2002
Michael L. Slive takes office as the seventh commissioner of the SEC.
May 2004
The SEC Task Force on Compliance and Enforcement issues its report at the 2004 Spring Meetings
February 23, 2005
The SEC announces the formation of its Academic Consortium, which will link academic resources of its 12 member institutions
June 2, 2006
SEC announces it will distribute a league-record $116.1 million back to the 12 member institutions under the 2005-06 revenue sharing plans.





Commisioner Mike Slive's Personal Profile

  Personal
  • Full Name: Michael Lawrence Slive
  • Born: July 26, 1940
  • Hometown: Utica, N.Y.
  • Family: Wife: Elizabeth
  • Daughter: Anna
  Education
  • Undergraduate: Dartmouth College - B.A., 1962
  • Graduate: University of Virginia - JD, 1965
  • Georgetown University - LLM, 1966
  • E. Barrett Prettyman Fellowship in Trial Advocacy
  Athletic Administration Experience
  • 1968-1969 Assistant Director of Athletics, Dartmouth College
  • 1979-1981 Assistant Executive Director, Pacific-10 Conference
  • 1981-1983 Director of Athletics, Cornell University
  • 1991-1995 Commissioner, Great Midwest Conference
  • 1995-2002 Commissioner, Conference USA
  • 2002- Commissioner, Southeastern Conference
  Legal Experience
  • 1969-77 Partner, Stebbins & Bradley, Hanover, N.H.
  • 1972-77 Judge of Hanover (N.H.) District Court
  • 1977-79 Judicial Master & Clerk of Grafton County (N.H.) Superior Court
  • 1983-86 Founder, Law Offices of Michael L. Slive, Hanover, N.H.
  • 1986-91 Partner, Coffield Ungaretti & Harris, Chicago, Ill.
  • 1990-91 Senior Partner and Founder, Slive-Glazier Sports Group, Chicago, Ill. & Kansas City, Mo.
  Membership on Boards and Committees
  • Commission on Athletic Opportunity (Reviewing Title IX)
  • NCAA Management Council [1997-2005]
  • NCAA Infractions Appeals Committee (Chair) [1993-2002]
  • NCAA Football USA (Chair, Board of Directors) [1998- 2003]
  • NCAA Division I Working Group to Study Basketball Issues [1998-99]
  • National Letter of Intent Appeals Committee (Chair) [1993- ]
  • Collegiate Commissioners Association (President) [2001-03]
  • Division I-A Commissioners (Chair) [1999-2001]
  • Sports Lawyers Association (Board of Directors) [1997-2001]
  • Board of Advisors of Marquette Sports Law Institute [1999- ]
  • NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Committee [2004- ]
  • Bowl Championship Series Coordinator (2006 - )
 

SEC Baseball

CWS