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Frequently Asked Questions
Chiropractic Division Menu
For Dr. Jerry Bailey
- What kinds of problems or injuries do you treat?
- Will you tell me exactly what my problem is?
- How long will treatment take?
- Will treatment hurt?
- Will my condition return?
- Can I just treat myself?
- What is the pop sound I hear during the manipulation?
- Do I need a referral from my doctor or insurance before I see you?
Naturopathic/Chinese Medicine Division Menu
For Dr. Pamela Langenderfer
- What is Naturopathic Medicine?
- Philosophy of Naturopathic Medicine
- Education of Naturopathic Doctors
- Conditions Naturopathic & Oriental Medicine Can Help
- Finding a Qualified Naturopathic Doctor
- What is acupuncture?
- How does acupuncture work?
- Does acupuncture hurt?
- Is acupuncture safe?
- What conditions does acupuncture treat?
- What is cupping?
- What should I expect on my first visit?
- How does moxibustion work? Does it hurt?
- What is moxibustion used for?
- Why do acupuncturists use mugwort? Why not use some other herb?
- Are there any precautions I should be aware of?
- How do I find an acupuncturist who practices moxibustion in my area?


What kinds of problems or injuries do you treat?
Dr. Bailey strictly treats musculoskeletal disorders, meaning conditions that effect the joints and muscles, as well as the related tissues and nerves. This includes disorders such as lower and upper back pain, neck pain, disc herniations, headaches, shoulder and arm pain, knee, hip, ankle and foot injuries and related conditions.

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Will you tell me exactly what my problem is?
Of course. We will discuss with you in detail what your problem is so that you will understand your condition. It is important that you have a clear understanding of what your condition is, what we will do for you to help you achieve recovery, and also what you will be doing at home to aid in recovery. We will also show you how to prevent reoccurrence of the same condition and control your own health.

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How long will treatment take?
Treatment for various conditions can range from a few days up to 12 weeks. This depends on numerous variables such as diet, general health, current physical fitness level, work conditions and the length of time you have had the condition. Your commitment to your health and ability to do the prescribed exercises is also paramount to recovery.

Treatment itself may range from a few visits over a couple days in simpler cases to a few weeks for more complicated cases. The average length of treatment is between three to ten visits. The goal is to get you well as quickly as possible, give you the tools needed to prevent reoccurrence and prescribe appropriate rehabilitation exercises for you to perform.

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Will treatment hurt?
Most patients report that the treatment procedures used are comfortable. However, like most procedures used in medical offices there may be some increased discomfort for a day or so after the first one or two treatments. This typically subsides within a few minutes to a couple hours. The most reported experience is mild discomfort or soreness comparable to working out for the first time. We make every attempt to use procedures that work quickly and are effective, yet are as gentle as possible.

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Will my condition return?
Research suggests that between 50% and 70% of back pain suffers will see the problem return at some point in their lives. This reoccurrence is the biggest issue. Experience has found that many times the return of the problem is often within the patients control. Following successful treatment with therapy and exercises, if the patient faithfully performs their exercises and improves general lifestyle choices, the likelihood of future reoccurrence is greatly diminished.

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Can I just treat myself?
No. A chiropractic physician studies for years to understand where, when, and how to provide the appropriate manipulative therapy along with exercise prescription. However, even with this knowledge can a chiropractor perform the procedure on himself? No. It is impossible to treat with manipulation by yourself. But with the appropriate exercises, following treatment, you can attempt to relieve the problem if it acts up.

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What is the pop sound I hear during the manipulation?
When a joint gets manipulated, tiny gas bubbles within the fluid inside the joints �pop�. This is a normal occurrence and is similar to the sound you make when you crack your knuckles. This may or may not indicate success with the manipulation. We look at how the joint moves after the procedure to see if it worked or not and do not use the pop as an indicator of success for treatment. Typically it is much more complicated than the simple pop sound.

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Do I need a referral from my doctor or insurance before I see you?
Chiropractors are considered �portal of entry� physicians and, generally speaking, no referral or permission is needed to receive care at this clinic. However, there are some insurance plans that require a referral from the primary care physician before you see a specialist. In this care you would need to see them to get the referral, since on these plans we are considered specialists. In an emergency situation you can always schedule with our clinic.

We send a report to your physician to inform them of your condition and what the treatment is.

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What is Naturopathic Medicine?
Naturopathic medicine blends centuries-old natural, nontoxic therapies with current advances in the study of health and human systems, covering all aspects of family health from pediatric to geriatric care.

Naturopathic medicine concentrates on whole-patient wellness, tailoring treatment to the patient and emphasizing prevention and self care. Naturopathic medicine attempts to find the underlying cause of the patient�s condition rather than focusing solely on symptomatic treatment. Naturopathic physicians cooperate with all other branches of medical science, referring patients to other practitioners for diagnosis or treatment when appropriate.

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Philosophy of Naturopathic Medicine
First Do No Harm
Naturopaths use the least forceful & least invasive therapies first to minimize risks and harmful side effects that other methods can have.

The Healing Power of Nature
By using natural therapies, Naturopaths work to help maintain or restore the body�s inherent ability to heal itself.

Identify & Treat the Cause
Symptoms are not the disease, but rather an indication of an underlying cause creating imbalance. Naturopaths work to find the cause and remove obstacles which can prevent cure.

Treat the Whole Person
Illness is often due to many factors in a person�s life. Naturopathic Doctors take all of these into consideration when determining the best course of treatment for the individual.

Doctor as Teacher
One of the goals of Naturopathic Medicine is to educate people about how to take an active role in creating health by learning how their bodies function and what causes malfunction.

Prevention is the Best Cure
Naturopaths educate patients about a healthy lifestyle in order to prevent minor illnesses from developing into more serious or chronic degenerative conditions.

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Education of Naturopathic Doctors
(N.D.) attend an accredited four-year post graduate Naturopathic medical school. Naturopaths are educated in all the same basic sciences as Medical Doctors (M.D.), but also study holistic approaches to therapy with a strong emphasis on disease prevention and optimal wellness.

In addition to a standard medical curriculum, Naturopathic physicians are required to complete four years of training in clinical nutrition, homeopathy, botanical medicine, physical medicine, psychology and counseling. Clinical training occurs at naturopathic and community based clinics under the direct supervision of licensed Naturopathic Doctors.

A Naturopathic physician takes rigorous professional board exams so that he or she may be licensed by a state or jurisdiction as a primary care general practice physician.

Education includes such courses as:
*Anatomy *Pharmacology *Physiotherapy
*Physiology *Cardiology *Radiology
*Biochemistry *Pediatrics *Neurology
*Immunology *Gynecology *Dermatology
*Microbiology *Minor Surgery *Nutrition
*Pathology *Lab Diagnosis *IV Therapy
*Homeopathy *Herbal Medicine *Hydrotherapy
*Naturopathic Manipulation
*Clinical & Physical Diagnosis, and more...

Treatment Options Naturopathic Doctors start with safe, gentle yet effective treatment options. A a brief list includes...

Herbal (Botanical) Medicine
Nutritional/Dietary Counseling
Vitamin & Mineral Supplements
Homeopathy, Homeopathic Drainage
Physical Medicine
Flower Essences
Hydrotherapy
Preventive Medicine & Lifestyle Counseling
Detoxification and cleansing diets

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Conditions Naturopathic & Oriental Medicine Can Help
Naturopathic & Oriental Medicine can help a variety of acute, chronic, and unusual conditions affecting various body systems. The body does not get sick in parts, it is a complex interconnection of body, mind and spirit.

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Finding a Qualified Naturopathic Doctor
Currently, there are only four recognized accredited Naturopathic medical schools. These schools have been accredited by the Council of Naturopathic Medical Education (CNME), a division of the U.S. department of Education.

A Naturopathic Doctor that has attended one of these schools has undergone 4 years of post graduate training at an accredited Naturopathic medical school and has been supervised under a licensed Naturopathic Doctor.

Bastyr University; Kenmore, WA.

The National College of Naturopathic Medicine; Portland, OR.

Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine & Health Sciences; Tempe, AZ.

University of Bridgeport College of Naturopathic Medicine; Bridgeport, CT (candidate for accreditation)

The Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine; North York, ON.

Currently, only the following states have licensing laws for Naturopathic Doctors (ND). In these states ND�s are required to graduate from an accredited 4 year Naturopathic medical school and pass board exams in order to receive a license. These states include:

Alaska, Arizona, California, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Hawaii, Idaho, Kansas, Maine, Montana, New Hampshire, Oregon, Utah, Vermont, Washington, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands.

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What is acupuncture?
Acupuncture is one of the oldest and most commonly used system of healing in the world. Originating in China some 3,500 years ago, only in the last three decades has it become popular in the United States. In 1993, the Food and Drug Administration estimated that Americans made up to 12 million visits per year to acupuncture practitioners and spent upwards of half a billion dollars on acupuncture treatments.

Acupuncture points on the human body are connected by pathways called meridians. These meridians conduct energy, also known as qi (pronounced "chi"), between the surface of the body and its internal organs. Each point has a different effect on the qi that passes through it. Acupuncture is believed to help balance the body by allowing the normal flow of qi .

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How does acupuncture work?
Several theories have been presented as to exactly how acupuncture works. One theory suggests that pain impulses are blocked from reaching the spinal cord or brain at various "gates" to these areas. Since a majority of acupuncture points are either connected to (or are located near) neural structures, this suggests that acupuncture stimulates the nervous system.

Another theory suggests that acupuncture stimulates the body to produce narcotic-like substances called endorphins, which reduce pain. Other studies have found that other pain-relieving substances called opiods may be released into the body during an acupuncture treatment.

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Does acupuncture hurt?
Unlike hypodermic needles, acupuncture needles are solid, flexible, and hair-thin. They are not designed to cut the skin. Acupuncture needles are generally inserted a half-inch to an inch deep depending on the type of treatment being delivered.

While each person experiences acupuncture differently, most people feel only a minimal amount of pain as the needles are inserted. Some people reportedly feel a sensation of excitement, while others feel relaxed.

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Is acupuncture safe?
When practiced by a licensed, trained acupuncturist, acupuncture is extremely safe. Properly administered, acupuncture does no harm. However, there are certain conditions you should notify an acupuncturist about before undergoing treatment. If you have a pacemaker, for instance, you should not receive electroacupuncture due to the possibility of electromagnetic interference with the pacemaker. Similarly, if you have a tendency to bleed or bruise easily, or if you are a hemophiliac, you may want to consider a different type of care.

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What conditions does acupuncture treat?
In the late 1970s, the World Health Organization recognized the ability of acupuncture and Oriental medicine to treat nearly four dozen common ailments, including neuromusculoskeletal conditions (such as arthritis, neuralgia, insomnia, dizziness, and neck/shoulder pain); emotional and psychological disorders (such as depression and anxiety); circulatory disorders (such as hypertension, angina pectoris, arteriosclerosis and anemia); addictions to alcohol, nicotine and other drugs; respiratory disorders (such as emphysema, sinusitis, allergies and bronchitis); and gastrointestinal conditions (such as food allergies, ulcers, chronic diarrhea, constipation, indigestion, intestinal weakness, anorexia and gastritis).

In 1997, a consensus statement released by the National Institutes of Health found that acupuncture could be useful by itself or in combination with other therapies to treat addiction, headaches, menstrual cramps, tennis elbow, fibromyalgia, myofascial pain, osteoarthritis, lower back pain, carpal tunnel syndrome and asthma. Other studies have demonstrated that acupuncture may help in the rehabilitation of stroke patients and can relieve nausea in patients recovering from chemotherapy.

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What is cupping?
Cupping is the use of glass cups to stimulate blood flow to a particular area. In a typical cupping session, a cotton ball soaked in alcohol is lit on fire and placed inside a glass cup. Burning a substance inside the cup removes all the oxygen, thus creating a vacuum.

As the substance burns, the cup is turned upside-down so that the practitioner can place the cup over a specific area. The vacuum created by the lack of oxygen anchors the cup to the skin and pulls it upward on the inside of the glass as the air inside the jar cools. Drawing up the skin is believed to open up the skin's pores, which helps to stimulate the flow of blood, balances and realigns the flow of qi, breaks up obstructions, and creates an avenue for toxins to be drawn out of the body.

Depending on the condition being treated, the cups will be left in place from 5 to 10 minutes. Several cups may be placed on a patient's body at the same time. Some practitioners will also apply small amounts of medicated oils or herbal oils to the skin just before the cupping procedure, which lets them move the cups up and down particular acupoints or meridians after they have been applied.

In China, cupping is used primarily to treat respiratory conditions such as bronchitis, asthma, and congestion; arthritis; gastrointestinal disorders; and certain types of pain. Some practitioners also use cupping to treat depression and reduce swelling. Fleshy sites on the body, such as the back and stomach (and, to a lesser extent, the arms and legs), are the preferred sites for treatment.

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What should I expect on my first visit?
As with most health practitioners, the first visit to an acupuncturist usually begins with the practitioner taking a detailed history. Since traditional Chinese medicine takes a more holistic approach to patient care than Western medicine, you may be asked questions that appear unimportant (questions about your sleep habits, your ability to tolerate heat or cold, your dietary habits, etc.) but are actually vital to the type of care you will receive.

An examination of the tongue and pulse is then conducted. Using all of the information obtained during the history, tongue and pulse examination, a chinese diagnosis is made. Depending on the condition, needles are inserted into specific acupuncture points on the body. The acupuncturist may use moxa or electrical stimulation to enhance acupuncture's therapeutic effect. The first visit usually takes between 30-60 minutes. It may take several visits to see significant improvement or cure your condition.

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How does moxibustion work? Does it hurt?
There are two types of moxibustion: direct and indirect. In direct moxibustion, a small, cone-shaped amount of moxa is placed on top of an acupuncture point and burned. This type of moxibustion is further categorized into two types: scarring and non-scarring. With scarring moxibustion, the moxa is placed on a point, ignited, and allowed to remain onto the point until it burns out completely. This may lead to localized scarring, blisters and scarring after healing. With non-scarring moxibustion, the moxa is placed on the point and lit, but is extinguished or removed before it burns the skin. The patient will experience a pleasant heating sensation that penetrates deep into the skin, but should not experience any pain, blistering or scarring unless the moxa is left in place for too long.

Indirect moxibustion is currently the more popular form of care because there is a much lower risk of pain or burning. In indirect moxibustion, a practitioner lights one end of a moxa stick, roughly the shape and size of a cigar, and holds it close to the area being treated. The patient will feel a mild warming sensation. Another form of indirect moxibustion uses both acupuncture needles and moxa. A needle is inserted into an acupoint and retained. The tip of the needle is then wrapped in moxa and ignited, generating heat to the point and the surrounding area. After the desired effect is achieved, the moxa is extinguished and the needle(s) removed.

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What is moxibustion used for?
In traditional Chinese medicine, moxibustion is used on people who have a cold or stagnant condition. The burning of moxa is believed to expel cold and warm the meridians, which leads to smoother flow of blood and qi. In Western medicine, moxibustion has successfully been used to turn breech babies into a normal head-down position prior to childbirth. A landmark study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in 1998 found that up to 75% of women suffering from breech presentations before childbirth had fetuses that rotated to the normal position after receiving moxibustion at an acupuncture point on the Bladder meridian. Other studies have shown that moxibustion increases the movement of the fetus in pregnant women, and may reduce the symptoms of menstrual cramps when used in conjunction with traditional acupuncture.

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Why do acupuncturists use mugwort? Why not use some other herb?
Mugwort, also known as artemesia vulgaris or ai ye in Chinese, has a long history of use in folk medicine. Research has shown that it acts as an emmenagogue, an agent that increases blood circulation to the pelvic area and uterus. This could explain its use in treating breech births and menstrual cramps.

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Are there any precautions I should be aware of?
Although moxibustion has been safely used in traditional Chinese medicine for centuries, it is not for everyone. Because it is used specifically for patients suffering from cold or stagnant constitutions, it should not be used on anyone diagnosed with too much heat. Burning moxa also produces a great deal of smoke and a pungent odor. Patients with respiratory problems may request that their practitioner use smokeless moxa sticks as an alternative.

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How do I find an acupuncturist who practices moxibustion in my area?
Moxibustion is usually taught as part of a qualified acupuncture or traditional Chinese medicine degree program. Although there are no licensing or accreditation requirements associated with the practice of moxibustion, in the United States a practitioner must have an acupuncture license to be allowed to perform moxibustion.

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