PROVINCE OF QUEBEC

 

Part of the Teaching & Learning About Canada website

 

 

 - descriptions are also given in English.

 

Quebec

click to enlarge que_new_relief.jpg (154034 bytes) Relief map arcticquebec.jpg (296195 bytes) Arctic Quebec

© 2000. Government of Canada with permission from Natural Resources Canada.

 

  Yahoo! Quebec:Cities
Quebec City Quebec City & Region
  Office de la langue francaise
Quebec  & Cdn History La Page Montré@l
Accueil Montréal : site officiel de la Ville de Montréal  
Les Patriotes de 1837-38
Bienvenue sur le site des Franciscains du Québec  
Leaf Basin, Quebec Gaspe Peninsula
   
Premiers of Quebec- since 1867 Pulp & paper Industry in Quebec
  Quebec Road Maps
Arctic Quebec-Nunavik Quebec's Northern Cree
Quebec City History
  Quebec City      
Quebec City Webquest (UBC) Matagami    

The New Quebec Crater  in Ungava:  It is the most well-defined meteorite impact crater in Canada and it is one of the world's largest craters - a circular depression 260 metres deep in solid granite and over 3 kilometres across, surrounded by walls over 150 metres high.. One of the clearest lakes in the world fills much of the crater. As with anything like this, every site you visit has different measurements and statistics- read carefully.

Highest Tides

tidesque.jpg (226358 bytes)A long-simmering feud between Arctic Quebec and the Maritimes over who has the world's highest ocean tides has been settled by federal scientists, but neither side is happy with the outcome.

Authorities at the Canadian Hydrographic Service, the agency responsible for mapping domestic waterways, have declared a tie between the famous tides of the Bay of Fundy and those of Ungava Bay on the northern coast of Quebec.

... the world's largest tides, "with a range from low to high tide that can exceed 16 metres at the head of the bay," has been wiped out after scientists determined it was in a tidal tie with Leaf Basin in the southwest corner of Ungava Bay.

They say the highest tides in Leaf Basin are 16.8 metres. The latest high tide data from Burntcoat Head, N.S., on the shore of the Minas Basin shows 17-metre tides.

The very highest tides only occur in each location once every 18 years, so these numbers are projected estimates using annual high tide averages. Because the projected difference between Ungava Bay and the Bay of Fundy is only 20 centimetres,  it is a tie.

 

BAY OF FUNDY:

- Measurements at Minas Basin, N.S., were taken at Burntcoat Head, Latitude 45.18N, Longtitude 63.45W.

- Minas Basin is the broadest part of the southeast head of the Bay of Fundy. At its widest, it is 30 kilometres.

- A pressure tide gauge was submerged at one stage for 311 days to record the tides.

- Minas Basin was listed in the Guinness Book of World Records with the highest recorded tide at 16 metres.

- Mi'kmaq folklore suggests the high tides in the Bay of Fundy are caused by a mighty whale splashing its tail in water.

UNGAVA BAY:

- Measurements at Ungava Bay, Nunavik, were taken at Leaf Basin, Latitude 58.44N, Longitude 69.50W.

- Ungava Bay is an inlet of the Atlantic Ocean and is about 320 kilometres long and 257 km wide at its mouth.

- A pressure tide gauge was submerged for 200 days to record the tides.

- A group from Leaf Lake wrote to the Guinness Book of World Records claiming their tide reached 16.76 metres but the record was disputed and never entered.

- The Inuit of Ungava (the word means "toward the open water") have a legend that whales came from the fingers of the goddess Sedna.

 

See: 

Tasiujaq

Leaf Basin, Quebec

Fundy Tides

Hopewell Rocks, New Brunswick

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Longest Place Names


Some of the longest place name in Canada are found in Quebec. The number at the left refers to their rank in length. The number at the right refers to the number of letters.


2. Cours d'eau du Cordon des Terres des Sixième et Septième Rangs 52

3. Cours d'eau de la Concession Sud-Est du Rang Saint-David 48

4. Ruisseau Katakuschuwepaishit Kachikuschikepaisham 47

5. Décharge des Neuvième Dixième et Onzième Concessions 46

7. Embranchement des Rangs Saint-Georges et Séraphine 45

8. Rivière Eistustikwepaich Kaschewekahikanistikw 44

9. Cours d'eau des Cinquième et Sixième Rangs de Milton 44

10. Embranchement de la Deuxième Concession Foucault 43

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FRANCOPHONES IN QUEBEC

charts7.gif (6318 bytes)

92% of Allophones live in Ontario, B.C. , Quebec or Alberta.

 

Increase in rate of English-French bilingualism nationally

About 5,231,500 people reported to the 2001 Census that they were bilingual, compared with 4,841,300 five years earlier, an 8.1% increase. In 2001, these individuals represented 17.7% of the population, up from 17.0% in 1996.

Nationally, 43.4% of francophones reported that they were bilingual, compared with 9.0% of anglophones.

Within Quebec, the growth in the bilingualism rate from 1996 to 2001 was even greater than in the previous five-year period. In 2001, two out of every five individuals (40.8%) reported that they were bilingual, compared with 37.8% in 1996 and 35.4% in 1991.

Outside Quebec, however, the rate remained almost unchanged at 10.3% in 2001 compared with 10.2% in 1996.

The bilingualism rate increased in every province except Manitoba and Saskatchewan. However, in almost every case, the rate of increase was slower than or equal to the gain between 1991 and 1996. The decline in Manitoba and Saskatchewan was related to the decrease in their francophone populations.

In New Brunswick, 34.2% of the population reported that they were bilingual in 2001, compared with 32.6% in 1996 and 29.5% in 1991.

Ontario's rate edged up from 11.6% to 11.7%. In Prince Edward Island, it rose a full percentage point, from 11.0% to 12.0%. - Stats Canada

 

 

NEXT ?

NFLD NS NB P.E.I. QUEBEC
ONTARIO MANITOBA SASK. ALBERTA BC
YUKON NW TERR. NUNAVUT CANADA CITIES

 

 

For more information, see Graphs and Tables Based on Canadian Statistics

 

QUEBEC 15.5% of Canada's Area 24.61% of Canada's Population

 

Where the names came from

QUEBEC

The name was applied first to the region of the modern city and the word is of undoubted Algonquin origin. Early spellings: Quebecq (Levasseur, 1601); Kébec (Lescarbot, 1609); Quebec (Champlain, 1613). Champlain wrote of the location in 1632: "It ... is a strait of the river, so called by the Indians" - a reference to the Algonquin word for "narrow passage" or "strait" to indicate the narrowing of the river at Cape Diamond. The term is common to the Algonquin, Cree, and Micmac languages and signifies the same in each dialect.

QUÉBEC

Derived from the Amerindian word kebek, indicating a strait or channel that narrows. The name was applied first to the region of the modern city and the word is of undoubted Algonquin origin. Early spellings: Quebecq (Levasseur, 1601); Kébec (Lescarbot, 1609); Quebec (Champlain, 1613). Champlain wrote of the location in 1632: "It...is a strait of the river, so called by the Indians" - a reference to the Algonquin word for "narrow passage" or "strait" to indicate the narrowing of the river at Cape Diamond. The term is common to the Algonquin, Cree, and Micmac languages and signifies the same in each dialect.

 

 

 


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QUEBEC
Bagotville AP 48° 20' N 71° 0' W
Chicoutimi 48° 25' N 71° 5' W
Drummondville 45° 53' N 72° 29' W
Granby 45° 23' N 72° 42' W
Hull 45° 26' N 75° 44' W
Megantic AP 45° 35' N 70° 52' W
Montreal AP (S) 45° 28' N 73° 45' W
Quebec AP 46° 48' N 71° 23' W
Rimouski 48° 27' N 68° 32' W
St Jean 45° 18' N 73° 16' W
St Jerome 45° 48' N 74° 1' W
Sept. Iles AP (S) 50° 13' N 66° 16' W
Shawinigan 46° 34' N 72° 43' W
Sherbrooke Co 45° 24' N 71° 54' W
Thetford Mines 46° 4' N 71° 19' W
Trois Rivieres 46° 21' N 72° 35' W
Val D'or AP 48° 3' N 77° 47' W
Valleyfield 45° 16' N 74° 6' W