Cincinnati.Com
NKY.COM  |  ENQUIRER  |  POST  |  CIN WEEKLY  |  Classifieds  |  Cars  |  Homes  |  Jobs  |  Help
Currently:
75°F
Mostly Cloudy
Weather | Traffic
The Cincinnati Post
POST HOME
NEWS
ENTERTAINMENT
SPORTS
REDS
BENGALS
LOCAL GUIDE
MULTIMEDIA
ARCHIVES
SEARCH
 
DEPARTMENTS 
NEWS 
SPORTS 
BUSINESS 
Motley Fool 
LIVING 
OPINION 
KENTUCKY 

RESOURCES 
Subscribe 
Contact Us 
Search 
Back Issues 
The Post Store 

U.S. & WORLD 
A.P. Top Stories 
A.P. In Depth 

SCRIPPS LINKS 
Do It Yourself 
Fine Living 
Food Network 
Home & Garden 

SPORTS 
Bengals 
Reds 
Golf Guide 
Hockey 

ENTERTAINMENT 
Movies 
Dining 
Menus 
Local Events 
Video Games 

CLASSIFIEDS 
Jobs 
Cars 
Homes 
General 


 

Engine failures cause GE overhaul

By Ken Stammen, Post staff reporter

Engineers at GE Aircraft Engines are reviewing the design of a widely used engine it makes following the latest in a string of mechanical failures the engine experienced.

The National Transportation Safety Board recommended on Dec. 12 that the Federal Aviation Administration conduct a design review of the engine, the CF6, after investigating a Sept. 22 incident in Philadelphia in which an engine on a USAirways 767 blew apart during a maintenance check.

Stock drops
GE stock fell $4.19 to $43.75 Tuesday.

That was down nearly 9 percent from its 2000 year-end closing price.


The NTSB determined that a disk in the engine's high-pressure turbine failed, splitting the engine in half and sending engine parts flying. It said the airplane might not have been able to maintain safe flight if the incident had occurred in the air.

The FAA has not acted on the NTSB's recommendation but GE Aircraft Engines spokesman Rick Kennedy said GE is already doing its own design review. The design and administration of the CF6 is done at GE Aircraft's Evendale headquarters and the engine is manufactured in Durham, N.C.

The engine is one of the most widely used, powering large planes like Boeing's 747, 767 DC-10 and MD-11 and the Airbus Industrie A330.

Kennedy said the cause of the disk's failure has not been determined and there have been no other incidents where that happened.

''There is nothing to suggest a problem with materials or a problem with the design,'' he said.

FAA spokesman Les Dorr Jr. said the agency is likely to order some kind of inspection program to address the disk problem.

Evendale-based GEAE is already spending between $20 million and $30 million to correct other problems with the CF6 that arose earlier last year:

The bulk of that - about $18.8 million - is being spent to comply with an August FAA order that required earlier-than-usual inspections of the compressor spool on CF6 engines built before 1995.

The compressor spool is a high-stress part that compresses air that drives the engines. The order came after cracks in a spool forced a Brazilian airline to abort takeoff in June. GE developed a new compressor spool that it expects to replace the older spools with within five years.

Another problem emerged last year with nozzles that guide air through the back of the CF6. A Continental Airlines DC-10 had to return to Newark airport in April after its CF6 engine disintegrated. CF6 failures forced Continental jets to abort takeoffs in Newark and Amsterdam in September.

Engineers determined that locks on the nozzles had broken, allowing the normally stationary nozzles to rotate and collide with other parts. The FAA issued an order requiring airlines to install a set of pins developed by GE to prevent the nozzles from rotating.

Kennedy said the pins have been installed on all affected aircraft and GE has developed a new nozzle lock that doesn't crack that it expects the FAA require airlines to install later this year.

In a memo circulated to GE employees, GE said the CF6 has logged more than 200 million flight hours on large commercial aircraft and power more than 4,000 takeoffs everyday and sets ''industry leading'' standards for safety, performance and reliability. Kennedy said the incidents have not harmed CF6 sales.

Publication date: 01-03-01
 Email this story to a friend






Post Features
Store at the Post
Store at the Post

Subscribe Online
Subscribe Online

Personal Finance
Personal Finance

HGTV
HGTV

Lottery Numbers
Lottery Numbers

Contact Us
Business Dept

David Holthaus

Bob Driehaus

Greg Paeth

Jon Newberry

Alex Coolidge

LATEST BUSINESS,
TECHNOLOGY NEWS


South Korean Vehicle Sales Hit Record

Independence Air to Discontinue Flights

Euro Lower Against U.S. Dollar

2005: Tough Year for Florida Agriculture

South Korea, U.S. May Hold Beef Talks

Annual Gadget Show Is Biggest Ever

White House Says Web Site Counts Visitors

China Shuts 598 Sites for Online Smut

Intel to Unveil New Branding Strategy

Court OK Sought for Proposed Settlement

Digital Maps Going Beyond the Roads

Correction: Quinn-Resignation Story

S. Korea to Send Notices Via Mobile Phones

Backer of Microsoft Challenge Steps Down

PlayStation Graffiti Ads Spark Controversy

Cincinnati.Com
Search our site by keyword:  
Search also: News | Jobs | Homes | Cars | Classifieds | Obits | Coupons | Events | Dining
Movies/DVDs | Video Games | Hotels | Golf | Visitor's Guide | Maps/Directions | Yellow Pages

  CINCINNATI.COM  |  NKY.COM  |  ENQUIRER  |  POST  |  CIN WEEKLY  |  Classifieds  |  Cars  |  Homes  |  Jobs  |  Help

Need help? | Suggestions | News tips | Letters to editors
Web advertising | Place a classified | Subscribe | Circulation

Copyright 2005 The Cincinnati Post, an E.W. Scripps newspaper.
Use of this site signifies agreement to terms of service updated 12/19/02.

E.W. Scipps