Home
About Mac1
Gallery
Safety Program
Used Airguns
Retail Prices
Order Form
Links

Mac1 Shop

     Services
     Service Agreement
     Venom Accessories

Airguns

     LD Pistol
     600 Mac1 Style
     Steroid Airgun         (Benj/Sheridan)
     Career Air Rifles
     Air Force Talon         (Stealth)
     Bulk CO2
        Tanks & Guns
     Mac1 Droopers
     Mac1 MatchBarrels
     Crosman Mac1Style
     Maintenance Tips
     PCP Components

Steroid Airguns



"Steroid Modified" BENJAMIN/SHERIDAN
Operators Supplement:


How to shoot the Gun:


1) Open the bolt and cock the gun 
2) Leave the bolt open while you are pumping the gun. 
3) Hold the gun with your left hand on the top of the receiver just behind the sight 
4) Pump it with your right hand as close to the lever end as is comfortable. 
5) Lefties do the opposite. Try to pump directly in front of your chest for best leverage.


Lubrication

EVERY TIME YOU TAKE IT OUT TO USE IT YOU WANT TO MAKE SURE THAT THE LEVER PIVOTS ARE MOIST WITH SECRET SAUCE.

Don't over do it, a drop at each pivot is all you need in 3 spots only; At the front pivot, the rivet, and where the link connects with the pump piston. All else will get taken care of by blow through. Never put lubricant in the airhole. Do NOT use gun cleaning solvents anywhere on the gun ... Slick Fifty, Airtool oil, or FP10 can be used to clean the barrel via patches pulled through if desired. 


Storage:

STEROIDS PREFER TO BE LEFT PUMPED UP. 

It is far better to leave 14 in it than to leave it empty, but this can eventually damage the check valve if overdone. Keep at least 2-4 pumps at all times, it will keep this way for years. Never try to pump gun if its not cocked.  If you want to leave it uncocked you can stroke it a few times while holding the bolt PARTIALLY open the bolt when you are going to put it away and make sure it took the air. My trick is to pull the bolt back just a little so it doesn't cock but the hammer is pulled away from the valve. It finds alignment better without the hammer touching the stem. This can result in intermittent valve misalignment. 


Shooting the gun:

For the best possible shot consistency, and to avoid damaging stress on the gun. It should be cleared after a 14 pump max power shot by pumping it one more time and firing it to dump all the air. The alternative is to only pump it 13 times on the next shot. The different weights of pellets offer differing amounts of back pressure. This decides whether it passes all the air or not. When you try a new pellets make notes of how much residual air left when the system is maxed out with each type of pellet. Heavies will not allow as much to release and result in higher energy figures. There should be no residual air below 12 Pumps regardless of pellet type.  First be very deliberate and consistent with your pump strokes. If it is hard to pump at the low number of pumps the gun is starving for lube and shouldn't be used further as damage can occur. Try not to twist the lever while pumping. 

As long as this airgun is well maintained it should last for many years of shooting enjoyment. If something appears to failing it is best to take action before it causes further damage. In extremely cold climates it is extra important to leave your steroid pumped. Plastics tend to expand and contract with hot and cold and the best way to keep the seat is to keep it seated. If valve seepage occurs you can remove the stock and warm the action at the valve area below a hot water faucet and usually this will promote enough compliance in the plastic to reseat. Once you have got a seal maintain it with pressure. The pressure is what holds the valve shut. Use it to your advantage. 

 

Enjoy your rifle:

If you have any problems, contact Mac-1 and we will do our best to see to your needs. Do NOT attempt to dismantle and repair the gun, or have others repair it without considering this is a custom gun with special components. Your warranty can, and usually will will be voided by unauthorized repairs.


Steroid Airgun Tips

 

Mac-1 has modified Sheridans for around 2 decades.

My approach changes as the guns evolve. I could at one point many years back simply install an adjustable piston, a better check valve, and a beefier hammer spring and we could coax 900 out of most 5mm's. Things have changed a great deal. To get that type of performance nowadays from an early dan as I call Sheridans you would need to machine the valve, remanufacture the lever or replace with billet, fabricate custom inlet and outlet seals as well as do the custom piston. It actually is a little easier to start with the new gun and go billet/steroid/williams straight away and You don't have to fuss with whether the gun can take the stress etc. But it isn't cheap and if you have an old C laying around with a blown check or leaky valve you just might have a gem in the rough.


Early model C and CB.


The basic tune is $55 which uses upgraded factory components and Mac-1's check valve. What gets done on a $75 steroid tune? 

For the additional $20 I remachine the valve body to receive Mac-1's delrin outlet valve, install a custom adjustable piston, beef up the factory lever, and tune the gun to around 900 fps.
 

What's a billet lever?

$45

The factory discontinued the levers for the C and CB several years ago. I tooled up to remanufacture the factory lever with new pivot bearing. When buckled levers came in we could not fix the guns. We were forced to do a billet lever cause we were completely out of levers. Billet anything is defined as made from solid stock. In this case the lever arm is machined from solid steel and the part is far more rigid than the stock item. Made with a replaceable hardened steel bushing at the primary pivot this lever is what I call the lastlever because it will literally last forever. Billet levers are available for new and old model guns but when fitting the billet to any C or CB the customer is advised to also replace the early front plug with a late model brass plug($5) to make sure the front end is solid and the pins don't slip out. So the total to do a billet steroid to an early Sheridan is $125. These will shoot over 900 in .20 with light ammo at 14 pumps.


Late Model C9A or CB9A or 392.


Steroid Tune $75 on your gun. Adds $45 to the price of a new gun. The late model gun gets a little different treatment. I do the custom piston, delrin stem, and beef the factory lever. I also do a bolt probe modification to enhance airflow and of course the two stage trigger is tuned to a 1 lb. take up and 2-3 lb. break. The billet lever(adds $45) is especially popular with the new guns. It makes the lever feel like a quality car door shutting. So a billet/steroid tune including trigger, piston, bolt, and valve work cost $115 for YOUR late model gun. It costs $90 on top of the price of a new gun purchase.


Williams Peep Option

(add $25 to gun purchase or repair).


Extended Billet option is when we cut off four inches of the front of the buttstock wood and move the forearm back for better leverage with a longer arm. This option is $30.

 

In the last 8 years the Benjamins/Sheridans have had predrilled holes on the right side of breech. If your gun doesn't have holes on the right side you will have to have them drilled and tapped for an additional $10 to fit the peep.


Integramount Option
Adds $35. 

Purchased separately it is $44.95


Dovetail Option

(Add $25 to gun purchase or repair).


For the last four years or so the breech has been produced from round material and is wide enough for us to cut dovetails directly in the breech for a sure grip between gun and scope. It is fairly awkward to fit a scope to any underlever pump pneumatic because the most favorable spot for holding the gun is being taken by the scope. I highly recommend the peep for that reason. If you must fit a scope you want to glue the factory base on if you choose to use that. The better approach is to dovetail the breech but as both will force you into extremely short scopes and/or high mounts it seems a poor choice at best. The cheekpiece will become a chin piece, plus cocking and pumping effort will increase.

Third Pin Modification
All new guns we sell get the beefy lever modification.  This is essentially a third pin in the forearm to help take the stress off the lever. The steroid/billet lever gun doesn't need the third pin because the lever is so strong.  If it is for a collection and you're not going to shoot it, let us know.  We won't do the beefy lever mod.  The third pin will detract from the collector's value to the terminally anal.  It is standard for guns sold at Mac1 to shooters who plan to shoot.


Prices for guns:

Benjamin 392 or 397 *

$130.00

Black .22 or .177 pump rifle

Benjamin S397

$135.00

Chrome plated .177 pump rifle

Sheridan CB9A*

$140.00

Black .20 pump rifle

Sheridan C9A

$150.00

Chrome plated .20 pump rifle

EB 17 or 20 **

$  99.95

Black .177 or .20 CO2 pistol

HB 17, 20, or 22 **

$109.95

Black .177, .20, .22 pump pistol

H17 or 20

$116.95

Chrome plated .177 or .20 pump pistol

 

* Polished Brass option $50.00 for rifles, includes clearcoat

** Polished Brass option $40.00 for pistols, includes clearcoat


All contents of this website are copyright �2001 by Mac1 Airgun Distributors/McMurray & Son. All rights reserved.