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Activity Detail



Activity No. 155
Activity Title  Railway Service Provision
Start Date  26 Sep 1855
End Date  -
Creation  -
Abolition  -
Descriptive Note  The Railway Traveller
Railway service provision commenced on 26 September, 1855 (1) when the first trains operated on the Sydney-Parramatta or the 'Great Trunk' line. In its first full year of operation 350,724 passengers had used the service. (2) In the Nineteenth Century, passenger traffic was the largest single purpose for train journeys, and accounted for more than half of all train miles traversed. In 1871 of a total of 931, 333 miles travelled 537, 846 miles were by passenger trains (3) In 1880 the Commissioner for railways observed that the number of passengers had risen from 776,707 to 5,440,138 in a decade during which time the miles of railway line had increased from 339 to 849 miles. (4)

The location of the original terminus at Redfern discouraged many passengers, and the construction of a new station in the City was the subject of many petitions to Parliament before the Central Station was erected at the Southern end of the City in 1906.

In 1889 the Commissioners of Railways reported that services for travellers had been improved by new railway timetables, greater speed of trains, an increase in punctuality of trains and reduction of fares on many routes. It was hoped that this would encourage patronage of railway services. (5)

Cheap excursion tickets were introduced in 1891 enabling passengers to travel second class to Bourke or Albury for 35/- or 25/- respectively. (6) An accelerated train service between Sydney and Brisbane commenced on 2 August 1891. (7)

Free rail passes were provided from the commencement of railway service. Recipients included distinguished visitors, judges on circuit, members of the defence forces, senior public servants, the unemployed, immigrants, Aboriginal people, and people on sundry kinds of voluntary service. On application, arrangements were made for free passes to be issued for major events including for the members of the media. In the six years 1901-1907, suburban passenger traffic at Central Station increased 38% and country passenger traffic increased 33% (8)

Passenger journeys on the suburban railways increased by approximately 80,000 passenger journeys a day between the period 1915 and 1920, and the Commissioner believed that it was not possible to increase the services without the electrification of the service. (9)

With the completion of the ‘city circle’ railway line on 22 January, 1956 linking Wynyard to St James via Circular Quay, and the electrification of the Western line to Penrith on 9 October, 1955 electric train travel was very much increased and more direct journeys were available. (10) The City railway promised a train every two minutes in peak hours and every 6 minutes at other times. The completion of the electric railway to Lithgow on 9 June 1957 reduced journey times for passengers by one hour and for goods trains by up to two hours. A cleaner and more comfortable journey was now available for passengers. (11)

Coping with Competition
By 1930 the railways had begun to feel the loss of passenger and freight business to the developing road transport. This affected the efficiency and the income of the railways as initially business fell only about 2-3% - enough to reduce profitability without being sufficient to reduce the number of trains running. (12) Registered motor cars rose from 62,471 in 1924 to 169,495 in 1930. During the same period motor lorry numbers increased from 11,970 to 43,074. The competition from motor traffic continued to impinge on rail transport causing the Commissioners to observe “The use of private motor cars for excursions, for long distance travel, and even for daily suburban travel. Has greatly increased during the last five or six years. In addition to the driver, there is often a full load of friends and relatives, and there is evidence in more recent times that private motor cars are frequently carrying passengers free or for a fare; so that to-day the private car is the railway’s most serious competitor for passenger traffic, although the bus and motor coach are important factors in the situation.’ (13) The railways were left with the lower-paying passengers particularly workers using periodical tickets and schoolchildren and were receiving a low return (more often a deficit) on the investment of the state in providing the infrastructure. The railways continued to seek ways of attracting new custom including extending the range of excursion tickets, including between Sydney and Melbourne. A telephone complaints line was installed to assist in meeting the needs of the travelling public and more competitive services and rates were offered for fruit, stock and grain transportation. (14) For the comfort of passengers more sleeping berths were made available on the longer journeys (15) and railway refreshment room service was improved. (16)

The Sydney Ticket office was transferred to new premises at Challis House with more comfortable facilities for the public. (17) From 1 February 1947 passengers on the Melbourne and Brisbane Expresses were able to book sleeping accommodation 28 days in advance. There were five ‘off line’ booking agencies at major suburban centres including one at David Jones department store. (18) Later off-line booking offices were established in Wagga Wagga, Armidale and other regional centres.

The railways contribution to the New South Wales sesquicentenary celebrations in 1938 included the exhibition in Martin Place of the original locomotive on the Sydney-Parramatta line and a Departmental exhibition at the Royal Easter Show. This participation was most successful in raising the profile of the railways in the face of strong competition from road transport, (19) Direct advertising and promotional activities became a regular program for attracting railway business.

Competition from air travel became a factor after the mid 1950s and the railways met this challenge by acquisition of more modern rolling stock, and attention to timetables and the provision of fast and efficient service. Passenger travel began to decrease for other sociological reasons including the preference for the family motor car and the development of local shopping centres. Among incentives to travel by rail were the introduction of ‘Shopper’s Excursions’ and family tickets and special rates to tourist destinations. (20)

Passenger steam trains puffed out of history on 24 July 1971 when the final passenger steam train travelled from Singleton to Newcastle (21) Several poorly patronised railway stations (particularly in country areas) were closed during 1975 in order to make more efficient use of rolling stock. (22)

The Railways Enter the Tourism Business
The Railways entered the tourist market by arranging tours for adults and in 1933 this was extended to tours (sometimes called ‘cruises’) for school children. (23)

From 8 February 1953 one day railway tours commenced conveying passengers from Sydney to ‘country centres of tourist attraction’. Tourists received an en-route commentary, leaflets and maps, and in some cases road tours on arrival. These proved popular and it was sometimes necessary to put on a second train. (24)

A Railway Travel Bureau commenced operation on 3 December 1958 in addition to booking rail tickets; tours, accommodation and interstate rail travel could be arranged. (25)

Serving the New Settler
Services to newly arrived immigrants were increased in 1934 when a railway officers boarded ships on arrival at Port Jackson to assist with railway bookings. In July 1934 this service was increased to include facilities for the despatch of luggage for rail passengers. (26) Although this was suspended during the Second World War the service re-commenced in January 1947.

The Challenge of World War II
During the Second World War railway services underwent a number of changes to assist with the war effort. From Friday 19 December 1941 many excursion and concession tickets were suspended to deter the incentive for recreational travel in order to comply with the Government’s undertaking to conserve coal. Country train services (especially to tourist destinations) were reduced from 3 May 1942 so that trains could be made available for the mobilisation of armed forces, military equipment and prisoners of war and their guards. (27) Train travel for the shorter journey however, continued to be encouraged with the wider availability of workmen’s weeklies, family excursions within the metropolitan areas, concessions to invalids, widows and old age pensioners. Concessions became available from 5 January 1942 for the evacuation from the riskier coastal areas. (28) On 23 June, 1942 Restriction of Interstate Passenger Transport Order No. 1 a system of permits for interstate travel which excluded all but essential travel. (29) The railways also assisted with Air Raid Precautions by ‘blacking out’ buildings, installing sirens, allocating buildings as air raid shelters and training staff in emergency procedures. (30) In October Rail services (both passenger and freight) were reduced by 26 2/3% the greatest impact was upon the carriage of passengers, parcels, perishable foodstuffs, mails and newspapers’ particularly on the longer country routes. Some children were unable to attend school or had their education seriously disrupted. A further burden on the service was the necessity to use rolling stock to transport coal to the Victoria border where the shortage was more acute. (31)

The continuing shortage of coal which commenced during the war and continued into the next decade lead the Government to relax road tax on vehicles carrying freight which would otherwise would have been carried by rail. (32) For several years rail service provision had been plagued by staff shortages insufficient locomotives, shortage of coal or supply of inferior coal. In 1951 these factors culminated and in addition to severe flooding in several areas led to the cancellation of 4,454 services. (33)

Sustenance for the Journey
In 1871 the provision of refreshments for passengers was an area in which New South Wales fell behind other colonies. The Commissioner observed " the keepers of what are facetiously termed refreshment rooms on our railways are little more than apple-stall holders, and vendors of lollypops and stale pastry, serving out junks of sandwiches, and messes of tea and coffee to their customers, without any regard to their accommodation or comfort." (34) The introduction of Railway Refreshment Rooms was planned in 1872 with the rooms at Sydney, Mittagong, Penrith, Mount Victoria and Singleton to be leased to vendors who would provide hot beverages, spiritous and fermented liquors, hot and cold meals, take-away baskets for consumption during the journey and catering for group bookings. (35) Temperance groups were alarmed about the ready availability of alcohol, which they postulated had caused many railway accidents in Britain, and parliament received many petitions on this subject.

Most Railway Refreshment Rooms were taken over by the Department on 1 July 1917. Alterations were undertaken to improve the service for the public and to provide better accommodation for the staff. (36)

In 1948 a mobile tea and light refreshment buffet commenced service on the steam platforms at Central Railway Station. (37)

Buffet dining cars were inaugurated in 1950 when they were added to the new eight car Riverina Expresses. (38) The following year the same service was added to the Northern Tablelands Expresses. The role of Railway refreshment rooms changed gradually after the war when it became increasingly difficult to recruit suitable staff. Table service was replaced by counter service, set menus were encouraged for time economies. Modern kiosks were introduced to a number of suburban stations. Fruit for sale was brought direct from the Griffith Packing Sheds. In journey meals increased on long-distance trains. Buffet service included the supply of newspapers and magazines for the traveller.

Several railway refreshment rooms were closed and others were modified to exclude table accommodation from 1956 (39)

Some Railway Refreshment Rooms were leased to private enterprise form 1959 (40) Eventually all inefficient rooms and catering services on board trains were closed.

Misadventures
From the outset the railway travel was relatively accident-free with only two passenger deaths and 6 injuries between 1858 and 1864 (41) Railway travel was by 1871 considered to be safer for passenger both because it was free from the perils of the highwayman and because the railway was better placed to traverse inhospitable terrain than was a horse-drawn carriage. (42) Taking the train was also faster and more cost effective than the coach. For example the Picton to Goulburn journey, a distance of 75 miles occupied 13 ½ hours by road but 3.49 hours by rail. The fair was 8d per mile by road and 3 ¼d first class and 2 ½d second class by rail. (43) These advantages aside, the passenger was nevertheless advised to travel if possible by day and in clear whether when accidents were less likely to occur. (44)

A serious railway accident occurred at Peat’s Ridge on 21 June 1887 when a Special Train carrying passenger to Queen Victoria’s Jubilee celebrations ran out of control on a steep grade but was diverted into a siding. The engine fell into the water and several carriages were destroyed. Five people died and 73 were injured in the accident, which was found to have been caused by the driver’s inexperience in using the Westinghouse brake. (45)

On 31 October 1894 two passenger trains collided at Redfern Station owing to driver error. 43 people were injured and 13 died as a result of their injuries. The main cause of injury was scalding by steam escaping into the carriages when a boiler was damaged. (46)

On 18 January, 1977 a train derailment near Granville Station led to the locomotive colliding with a stanchion of the Bold Street Bridge causing several carriages to be crushed by bridge and the loss of 83 lives. The subsequent inquiry found that poorly maintained infrastructure was the cause and a program of maintenance ensued.

Faster and More Comfortable Trains
A new ‘mountain climbing’ Caves Express commenced operation in 1937 with side corridor carriages and extra wide windows. (47) The 80lb rails between Sydney and Newcastle were replaced 107lb rails reducing the journey time between the two cities to 2 ½ hours, and two fast trains were available on Saturday morning to suit patrons of sporting events and other activities (48)

The Silver City Comet (the first fully air-conditioned Diesel train), which ran from Parkes to Broken Hill commenced on 27 September 1937 maintained a speed of 45 miles per hour over the journey of 422 miles. (49) Other fast trains in service included The Fish (Sydney to Mount Victoria), and the Southern Highlands Express (Sydney to Goulburn,) (50) To add to passenger comfort photographs showing scenic views of New South Wales were placed in distance train carriages, booking services improved and more comfortable sleeping cars were made available (51)

Daylight express trains were introduced in 1941 (to cope with the limited supply of sleeping carriages. These trains included the Riverina Express (Sydney to Albury) Northern Tablelands Express (Sydney to Armidale) and the Central West Express (Sydney to Dubbo). (52)

The first of four new Sydney-Newcastle trains commenced service on 30 April 1948. The Commissioner for Railways noted "In addition to air-conditioning, features of the new Express include fluorescent lighting, panelling of polished timbers, stainless steel fittings, hot and cold water, facilities for serving light refreshments, improved seats, and a public address system for broadcasting interesting information during the journey. Externally the train is painted tuscan red and russet relieved with chrome yellow bands, and has a streamlined appearance." The train had capacity for 101 first class and 185 second class passengers. (53)

A two-car diesel rail motor train commenced service on the Dubbo to Coonamble line in 25 January 1949. A total of ten such trains for use on country branch lines was on order. Each was capable of carrying 28 first class and 56 second-class passengers. (54)

The Alco diesels manufactured in Canada in 1951 were used when available to pull the Brisbane Express and could deduct 3 hours from the travelling time. (55)

On 9 May 1955 the diesel Canberra-Monaro Express to Canberra and Cooma replaced the steam Federal City Express. (56) The Sydney-Melbourne Daylight Express was inaugurated on 27 March 1956. The air-conditioned trains (one from Sydney and one from Melbourne) were hauled by diesel electric locomotives and covered the journey in 13 ½ hours. (57) On the adoption of the uniform railway gauge the two divisions of the Southern Aurora which were owned jointly by the two governments and which commenced nightly operation between the two capitals on 16 April 1962. The train contained sleeping accommodation of various standards, a club car and dining car. The Victorian owned ‘Spirit of Progress’ was converted to standard gauge for the same journey. The Intercapital Daylight express continued to operated twice weekly for those who preferred daytime travel. (58)

New Trains for a New Era
Passenger comfort and safety on the suburban lines was assisted with the introduction of the air conditioned Tangaras. The existing fleet was refurbished to include improved lighting and seating. A program of installing electronic ticket barriers commenced from December 1993. Some Tangaras were modified for the outer suburban and interurban routes to include wheelchair facilities, disabled toilets and reversible seating. Railway stations were upgraded to include improved seating and lighting, more sheltered waiting areas, and disabled access (including ramps and lifts). (59) In November 1993 the ‘Night Safe’ program commenced in which after 9pm suburban passengers travellers in only two carriages in proximity to the guard to reduce the violence and drunken behaviour which plagued the late night traveller. (60)

From March 1994 the Endeavour Trains replaced diesels on the South Coast, Southern tablelands and Hunter Valley Services. These were capable of carrying 177 passengers in 2 carriages and were suitable for disabled passengers. (61)

The XPT replaced diesel and electric locomotives on the intrastate and interstate journeys. These new vehicles further reduced travelling time for example travelling time between Sydney and Melbourne was reduced from 13 hours to ten. (62) High speed. XPLORER trains replaced locomotives on the Sydney- Canberra and North-West Tablelands routes. (63)

Provision of Freight Services
From the outset it was considered that, because of the small population of Australia the main purpose of railway traffic would be the transport of goods. The main goods carried were wool, coal, livestock, grain hay, straw and chaff. In 1880 the Commissioner of railways observed that in a decade the weight of good transported had increased from 766,523 to 1,712,971 (64)

The railway conveyed mail for the Post Office but also provided a parcel transportation service between railway stations. In the final quarter of 1890 the transport of both minerals and wool increased dramatically to 441,824 tons (more than quadrupling the amount carried in the previous two months) and 321,952 bales (over a third of that freighted in the previous months). (65)

The goods traffic at Darling Harbour increased 56% between 1901 and 1907 and a loop line was constructed to connect this via to the abattoirs at Homebush Bay to the Western line near Campsie (66) In the second half of the Twentieth century coal was by far the largest commodity shipped followed by ‘general goods’ and other1/01/1860 ores and minerals for example in the year ended 30 June, 1948 31.39% of freight was coal, 27.78 ‘General Goods’, 6.58% wheat and 4.74% ores and other concentrates (67)

The parcel service developed by the addition of a ‘heavy parcels’ counter at the Sydney Parcels Depot. 400,000 parcels were handled in December 1936 with express trains to eleven major towns (and some stations in between) being necessary to cope with the workload (68)

The greater carrying power and speed of diesel locomotives brought increased freight and the capacity for new classes of freight including perishables. However, the container methods of transportation placed pressure on the railways to improve their freight-handling infrastructure. Co-ordination between rail and road transport for the delivery of freight services commenced. (69)

The first ‘through’ freight trains from Melbourne to Brisbane commenced on 2 January 1962 taking only 45 ¾ hours, with the journey from Sydney to Melbourne taking 16 hours (express) or 20 hours for other goods trains. (70)

Business increased in transporting containers a ‘Liner Service’ was introduced to move shipping containers between Sydney and other capital cities. (71)

Endnotes:
(1) Report on the origin and progress of the Railways of New South Wales from 1846 to 1864, inclusive by John Rae (Commissioner for Railways), 1866. p. 14
(2) Ibid. Appendix. p. 66
(3) Report on the construction and progress of the Railways of New South Wales from 1866 to1871 inclusive by John Rae, Commissioner for Railways, 1873. Appendix p.146
(4) Report of the Commissioner for Railways, 1880 p. 18 in NSW Parliamentary Papers 1881, Vol 4 p. 18
(5) Report of the Commissioners for Railways for the year ended 30 June 1889 p. 2-3 in NSW Parliamentary Papers Second Session 1889 vol 2. p. 244-5
(6) Report of the Commissioners for Railways for the quarter ended 31 December, 1890 in NSW Parliamentary Papers, 1891 Vol. 2 p. 658
(7) Report of the Commissioners for Railways for the quarter ended 30 September 1891 p. 2 in NSW Parliamentary Papers1891-2 Vol. 5. p. 98
(8) Report of the Royal Commission for the Improvement of the City of Sydney and its Suburbs, 1909, p. xxxv in NSW Parliamentary Papers 1909 Vol. 5 p. 413
(9) Report of the Commissioners for railways for the year ended 30 June 1920 p. 10 in NSW Parliamentary Papers, Second Session 1920 Vol 4 p. 687
(10) Report of the Commissioner for Railways for the Year ended 30 June 1956 p. 26.
(11) Report of the Commissioner for Railways for the Year ended 30 June, 1957 p. 23
(12) Annual report of the Commissioner Report of the Commissioners for Railways for the year ended 30 June 1929 p. 5. in NSW Parliamentary Papers 1929-30 vol. 4 p. 7.
(13) Annual report of the Railway Commissioners for New South Wales for the year ended 30 June 1930 p. 5 in NSW Parliamentary papers 1930-31-32 vol 4. p. 901
(14) Report of the Commissioner for Railways for the year ended 30 June, 1933 p. 13- 14 in NSW Parliamentary Papers 1933-34 vol 1 p. 13-14
(15) Report of the Commissioner for Railways for the year ended 30 June, 1934 p. 4-5 in NSW Parliamentary Papers 1934-35 vol 3 p. 182-183
(16) Ibid. p.12-13
(17) Report of the Commissioner for Railways for the year ended 30 June, 1937 p. 10 in NSW Parliamentary Papers 1937-38 vol 4 p. 702
(18) Department of Railways report for the year ended 30 June 1947 p. 20 in NSW Parliamentary Papers 1947-48l. 2 p. 830
(19) Report of the Commissioner for Railways for the year ended 30 June 1938 p. 6-7 in NSW Parliamentary Papers 1938-39-40 vol 6. p. 982-3
(20) Report of the Commissioner for Railways for the Year ended 30 June, 1960 p. 14
(21) Report of the Commissioner for Railways for the Year ended 30 June, 1972 p. 14
(22) Report of the Public Transport Commission for the year ended 30 June. 1975 p. 6 in NSW Parliamentary Papers 1975-76 vol 6 p. 122.
(23) Report of the Commissioner for Railways for the year ended 30 June, 1933 p. 12-13 in NSW Parliamentary Papers 1933-34 vol 1 p. 12-13
(24) Report of the Commissioner for Railways for the Year ended 30 June, 1953 p. 13-14
(25) Report of the Commissioner for Railways for the Year ended 30 June, 1959 p.16
(26) Report of the Commissioner for Railways for the year ended 30 June 1935 p. 6. in NSW parliamentary Papers 1935-36 Vol. 3 p. 362
(27) Report of the Commissioners for Railways for the year ended 30 June 1942 p. 8 in NSW Parliamentary Papers 1942-43 vol 1. p. 1972
(28) Loc. Cit.
(29) Report of the Commissioner for Transport for the year ended30 June, 1943 p. 8 in NSW Parliamentary Papers 1943-44 Vol 1 p. 1040
(30) Ibid. p. 9
(31) Report of the Commissioner for railways for the year ended 30 June, 1944 p.9 in NSW Parliamentary Papers 1944-45 vol. 1 p. 1033
(32) Report of the Commissioner for Railways for the year ended 30 June, 1949 p. 16-17 in NSW Parliamentary Papers 1948-49-50 Vol 3 p. 422-23
(33) Report of the Commissioner for Railways for the year ended 30 June, 1951 p. 13 in NSW Parliamentary Papers 1950-51-52 Vol 4 p. 603
(34) Report of the Commissioner for Railways for the year ended 30 June 1938 p. 10 in NSW Parliamentary Papers 1938-39-40 vol 6. p. 986
(35) Ibid. p. 11
(36) Annual report of the Chief Commissioner of Government Railways and Tramways for the year ended 30 June 1918. p. 4 in NSW Parliamentary Papers vol. 6 p. 7
(37) Report of the Commissioner for Railways for the year ended 30 June, 1948 p. 60
(38) Report of the Commissioner for Railways for the year ended 30 June, 1950 p. 64 in NSW Parliamentary Papers 1950-51-52 Vol 4 p. 568
(39) Report of the Commissioner for Railways for the Year ended 30 June, 1957 p. 27
(40) Report of the Commissioner for Railways for the Year ended 30 June, 1959 p.26
(41) Report on the origin and progress of the Railways of New South Wales from 1846 to 1864, inclusive by John Rae (Commissioner for Railways), 1866. Appendix .p. 71
(42) Report on the construction and progress of the Railways of New South Wales from 1866 to1871 inclusive by John Rae, Commissioner for Railways, 1873. p.25 in NSW Parliamentary papers 1872-73. Volume 2 p. 513
(43) Ibid. p. 26
(44) Ibid. p. 27
(45) Report of the Commissioner for Railways for the year ended 30 June, 1948 p. 60
(46) Annual Report of Railway Commissioners for the year ended 30 June, 1894 p. 4 in NSW Parliamentary Papers 1895 Vol 3 p. 416
(47) Report of the Commissioner for Railways for the year ended 30 June, 1937 p. 7 in NSW Parliamentary Papers 1937-38 vol 4 p. 699
(48) Ibid p. 8
(49) Report of the Commissioner for Railways for the year ended 30 June 1938 p. 10
(50) Ibid. p.11
(51) Ibid p. 11-12
(52) Report of the Commissioner for Railways for the year ended 30 June, 1941 p. 9 in NSW Parliamentary Papers 1941-42 Vol 1 p. 523
(53) Report of the Commissioner for Railways for the year ended 30 June, 1948 p. 18 in NSW Parliamentary Papers 1948-49-50 Vol 3 p. 340
(54) Report of the Commissioner for Railways for the year ended 30 June, 1949 p. 15 in NSW Parliamentary Papers 1948-49-50 Vol 3 p. 421
(55) Report of the Commissioner for Railways for the Year ended 30 June, 1952 p. 26 in NSW Parliamentary Papers 1952-53 p. 938
(56) Report of the Commissioner for Railways for the Year ended 30 June, 1955 p. 21-22
(57) Report of the Commissioner for Railways for the Year ended 30 June 1956 p 26-27.
(58) Report of the Commissioner for Railways for the Year ended 30 June, 1962 p. 15-161
(59) Report of the Public Transport Commission for the year ended 30 June. 1975 p. 6 in NSW Parliamentary Papers 1975-76 vol 6 p. 122.
(60) State Rail Authority Annual Report 30 June, 1994 p. 17
(61) State Rail Authority Annual Report 30 June, 1993 p. 21
(62) State Rail Authority Annual Report 30 June, 1994 p. 18
(63) Ibid. p. 21
(64) Report of the Commissioner for Railways, 1880 p. 18 in NSW Parliamentary Papers 1881, Vol 4 p. 18
(65) Report of the Commissioners for Railways for the quarter ended 31 December, 1890 in NSW Parliamentary Papers, 1891 Vol. 2 p. 658)
(66) Report of the Royal Commission for the Improvement of the City of Sydney and its Suburbs, 1909, p. xxxv in NSW Parliamentary Papers 1909 Vol. 5 p. 413
(67) Report of the Commissioner for Railways for the Year ended 30 June, 1948 p. 19 in NSW Parliamentary Papers 1948-49-50 Vol 3 p. 341)
(68) Report of the Commissioner for Railways for the year ended 30 June, 1937 p. 9 in NSW Parliamentary Papers 1937-38 vol 4 p. 701
(69) Report of the Commissioner for Railways for the Year ended 30 June, 1959 p.9
(70) Report of the Commissioner for Railways for the Year ended 30 June, 1962 p. 11
(71) Report of the Public Transport Commission for the year ended 30 June. 1975 p. 6 in NSW Parliamentary Papers 1975-76 vol 6 p. 122.


 
Functions containing this activity 
11 Infrastructure and Communications 11 Sep 1848 ~   Detail
 
Record series documenting this activity 
401 Auditor-General's working papers relating to the investigation of contracts entered into by the Department of Railways and the Department of Road Transport and Tramways 1 Jan 1947 ~ 31 Dec 1951   Detail
998 Copies of letters to the Railway Companies and Commissioners of Railways 26 Sep 1855 ~ 4 Nov 1856   Detail
1475 Records of the Commission (correspondence, draft reports, etc.) [Royal Commission of Inquiry into Railway Administration] 1 Jan 1905 ~ 31 Dec 1906   Detail
5473 Miscellaneous papers re Standard Hours for Government Railways and Tramways 1 Jan 1927 ~ 31 Dec 1933   Detail
7757 Notebooks: Government Railways and Tramways (Tramway) Board [Chief Justice P. W. Street] 1 Jan 1908 ~ 31 Dec 1908   Detail
12407 Annual reports [Public Transport Commission] 1 Jan 1973 ~ 1 Jul 1980   Detail
12883 Letters received by Superintendent H. Richardson, Traffic Inspector for the Great Southern, Great Western and Richmond railway lines 1 Nov 1880 ~ 31 Dec 1884   Detail
12884 Letters sent by Superintendent H. Richardson 1 Jan 1881 ~ 31 Dec 1881   Detail
12887 Registers of correspondence received [Department of Railways] 1 Jan 1896 ~ 31 Dec 1936   Detail
12888 Miscellaneous Register Book [Department of Railways] 1 Jan 1937 ~ 31 Dec 1938   Detail
12889 Works and miscellaneous files 1 Jan 1919 ~ 31 Dec 1958   Detail
12890 Estate Branch Registers of correspondence received 1 Jan 1921 ~ 31 Dec 1935   Detail
12891 Staff registers [Department of Railways] 1 Jan 1936 ~ 31 Dec 1953   Detail
12892 Staff files [Department of Railways] 1 Jan 1953 ~ 31 Dec 1958   Detail
12893 Traffic files [Department of Railways] 1 Jan 1952 ~ 31 Dec 1958   Detail
12894 Purchase and sales files 1 Jan 1953 ~ 31 Dec 1958   Detail
12895 Real estate files 1 Jan 1953 ~ 31 Dec 1958   Detail
12896 Correspondence received at Bargo railway station 1 Jan 1963 ~ 31 Dec 1970   Detail
12897 Electricity Supply Association of Australia: proceedings of Section Conference no. 2 on transmission, distribution and metering 1 Jan 1941 ~ 31 Dec 1953   Detail
12898 Accounts journal [Railways Branch] 1 Oct 1856 ~ 17 Oct 1863   Detail
 



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