Temple University Department of Film and Media Arts

traveling to & from philadelphia

Philadelphia is the second largest city on the East Coast of the United States and ranks fifth in the nation, with a metropolitan population of 5.8 million. Philadelphia is conveniently located in the middle of the Northeast Corridor, 100 miles south of New York, 133 miles north of Washington, D.C., and 55 miles from Atlantic City. More than 63 million people — approximately a quarter of the U.S. population — live within a 5.5-hour drive from Philadelphia.

Of course, there are many ways to get to and from Philadelphia.

Flying to Philadelphia

Fly into Philadelphia International Airport (PHL), which located seven miles from the center of the city. If you don't have a ride from the airport, you can take a taxi or take the R1 SEPTA train.

Taxis are a flat $25 airport rate (plus tip) to anywhere in Center City, Philadelphia. Rates to other places around the city will be more.

The R1 train is an easy and affordable way to get into town. There is a station for the R1 in each terminal of the airport. Follow signs to find the platform. The train heads into the center of the city, where you can transfer to other parts of the SEPTA system.

Driving to Philadelphia

Philadelphia is a major city on the Northeast Corridor of the United States. It's on the southeastern edge of Pennsylvania, across the river from New Jersey. But, a lot of people who are familar with the trip between D.C. and New York aren't sure where Philadelphia is since it's not directly on NJ Turnpike.

Driving directions from North: from the NJ Turnpike

· Follow New Jersey Turnpike South to Exit 4
· Follow 73 North to 38 West to 30 West
· Follow signs for Ben Franklin Bridge
· Staying in center lane, follow signs for Vine Street/Local Traffic
· Follow Vine Street to Broad Street (after 13th Street)
· Turn Right onto Broad Street
· Take Broad until Diamond Street, Turn Right onto Diamond
· Annenberg Hall is the second building on the right

Driving directions from the South: from I-95

· Follow 95 North to Exit 22 (Central Philadelphia)
· Follow signs for 676 West
· Continue on 676 to the Broad Street Exit
· Exit and turn right onto Broad Street
· Take Broad until Diamond Street, Turn Right onto Diamond
· Annenberg Hall is the second building on the right

Parking can be expensive in Philadelphia, but a bit of persistance and planning can save you from having to park in garages. Just be sure to obey all the signs explaining the parking regulations to prevent a ticket or getting towed.

Parking at Temple

At Temple, you can park on the street or in campus lots. On-the-street parking is available throughout campus, but it can be very hard to find a spot. Many of us who study and work in Annenberg park on the streets north of our building and walk the several blocks back to campus. On street parking in the area is free. An easier alternative is to park in the Temple University parking lots. Guests can park in Lot 4, (near Annenberg Hall and accessible from Diamond Street), for $9 per car per day. You can download a campus parking map for more details. There are also many on-the-street handicapped parking locations.

Public transportation from New York
(and cities north of Philadelphia):

From New York City, there are many options. These are the favorites:

1) Take the Chinatown bus. For $12 you can get a bus from Chinatown in NYC to Chinatown in Philadelphia. It's the cheapest form of public transporation, and takes 2 hours in light traffic, longer if traffic is slow (and traffic can get really backed-up).

2) Take New Jersey Transit (NJT) train from New York Penn Station to Trenton (on the Northeast Corridor Line). In Trenton, transfer to SEPTA (Southeastern Pennsylania Transportation Authority) . It's inconvenient to transfer trains in Trenton, but easy enough to do. Most of the people on the train will be doing the same thing and the conductors can tell you where to go. The NJT Train is $11.50, and the SEPTA train is $7.00 for a total of $18.50. Buy the ticket for the second half of your trip in Trenton, either on the train platform from a machine (safer/faster) or inside at the ticket counter (which can be risky because the second train will leave without you if you are running late. If you miss the connection, just wait for the next train). You can also buy a ticket on the train for an extra surcharge.

3) Take an Amtrak train from Penn Station in NYC to 30th Street Station in Philadelphia. This is more convenient than the other options, but also the most expensive. Tickets start at $42 each way. The regular train takes 1 hour 20 mins. The Acela Express (the high speed train) takes just over a hour, with tickets running $109 each way.

(This information was current in November 2005, based on weekday travel. Be sure to check the appropriate websites for weekend info, updated fares and schedules.)

Public transportation from D.C.
(and cities south of Philadelphia):

From D.C., the options are very similar:

1) Take the Chinatown bus. For $15 you can get a bus from Chinatown in Washington D.C. to Chinatown in Philadelphia.

2) Take an Amtrak train from Union Station in D.C. to 30th Street Station in Philadelphia. Tickets start at $40 each way. The regular train takes 2 hour 10 mins. The Acela Express (high speed train) takes 1 hour 45 mins, with tickets running $123 each way.

(This information was current in Spring 2006, based on weekday travel. Be sure to check the websites for updated fares and schedules.)

Getting Around Philly on Public Transportation

Philadelphia has a complex public transportation system that services much of the city fairly well. Buses, subways, trolleys and trains are all run by SEPTA.

Temple University is on the Broad Street Subway line, marked on SEPTA maps in orange. Two stops service Temple, the Cecil B Moore Station on the southwest corner of campus) and the Susquehanna-Dauphin Station (a couple blocks north of Diamond Street). The Susquehanna-Dauphin Station is closer to Annenberg Hall, yet at night many people prefer to walk to the Cecil B Moore Station. The subway takes a token, which can be bought (in packs) for $1.60 each, or you can pay $2.00 in cash. You can buy tokens at some subway stations, but not all. You can also buy tokens at the 7-11 in the middle of campus.