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Punctate Flower Chafer Fact File

Polystigma punctatum






Punctate Flower Chafer Beetle, <I>Polystigma punctatum</I>

Punctate Flower Chafer Beetle, Polystigma punctatum
Photo: R. Mulder

Punctate Flower Chafer Beetle, <I>Polystigma punctatum</I>

Punctate Flower Chafer Beetle, Polystigma punctatum
Photo: Bruce Hulbert





The flower chafers are usually attractively coloured beetles with striking enamelled or metallic patterns. They feed on nectar and are often found among the petals of flowers, particularly Angophora and Eucalyptus blossoms. About 10 species (in the family Scarabaeidae) occur in the Sydney region. The Punctate Flower Chafer is one of the most common.

Flower chafers are unusual beetles because they fly with their wing cases closed (most beetles lift their wing covers well clear of the body). The larvae of flower chafers are white and live in rotting wood or decaying vegetable matter.

Distribution:
From central New South Wales to northern Queensland.

Habitat:
Urban areas, forests and woodlands.

Status:
Common

Size:
1.4-1.8 cm long.