CNHI News Service Inland ocean port marks ‘35s’
Submit Story

Homepage
All CNHINS News
    Crime
    Disasters
    Education
    Environment
    General news
    Latino
    Military
    Government
    Politics
    Weather
Lifestyle
    Arts
    Automotive
    Books
    Entertainment
    Faith
    Family
    Fashion
    Fitness
    Food
    Garden
    Health
    Homes
    How-to
    Local history
    Medicine
    Science
    Seniors
    Technology
    Travel
Opinion
    Columns
    Editorials
Sports
    Sports, college
    Sports, high school
    Sports, local
    Sports Opinion
    Outdoors
    Sports, pro
Business
    Agriculture
    Energy / Oil and Gas
    Finance
    Real estate
CNHIns Originals
Talkers

News & reporting
Page design
Photography
On the Web
Ethics and Standards
Management and culture

Tom Lindley
national editor
812-282-1012 tlindley@cnhi.com

J.B. Blosser Bittner
deputy national editor
405-255-2985
jbittner@cnhi.com

Bill Ketter
CNHI vice president for editorial
978-946-2233
wketter@cnhi.com

May 03, 2006 12:36 pm

Photos


Barges await processing, docked at the Port of Catoosa. In addition to being an inland ocean port, the Port of Catoosa is also a 2,000-acre industrial park with 62 businesses employing approximately 3,500 persons. (Claremore DAILY PROGRESS PHOTO / Clarice Doyle) CLARICE DOYLE, Claremore (OK) Daily Progress

Inland ocean port marks ‘35s’

Nation's most inland ocean port expects 35,000th barge to dock this month.


CNHI News Service

CLAREMORE, Okla.The first significant “35” at the Tulsa Port of Catoosa took place 35 years ago when a single hopper barge loaded with 650 tons of newsprint docked at the Port of Catoosa’s general dry cargo wharf.
It was January 1971, and this was the first shipment of any kind to traverse the entire McClellan-Kerr Arkansas River Navigation System. Arriving from the Bowater Paper Co. in Calhoun, Tenn., 1,800 rolls of newsprint were destined for the Newspaper Printing Corporation, the company that printed the Tulsa World and Tulsa Tribune newspapers. People came from miles around to watch the barge approach.
One month later, William Verity, president of Armco Steel Co. officially dedicated the Port of Catoosa. By this time approximately 3,500 tons of cargo had already been handled at Port terminals.
Waterway transportation continued to grow.
Today, approximately 2 million tons of waterborne cargo pass over the port’s docks every year. Over the past 35 years, 56 million tons of cargo have been transferred at the Port of Catoosa in 35,000 barges.
“We can’t predict the exact date the 35,000th barge will arrive,” said Steve Kissee, chair of the Rogers County Port Authority, but it will be sometime in May.”
In addition to being the nation's most inland ocean port, the Port of Catoosa is also a 2,000-acre industrial park with 62 businesses employing approximately 3,500 people.

Claremore (Okla.) Progress

Story Title

Story Body

Pick your state

© 2007 Community Newspaper Holdings, Inc.CNHI News Service
3500 Colonnade Parkway, Suite 600, Birmingham, AL 35243; (205) 298-7100