About Street Fiction

Street Fiction is dedicated to reviewing street fiction, also known as urban fiction, street lit, or gangsta fiction. One of the fastest growing genres, these books expose the reader to drugs, violence, sex and and the gritty realities of street life in urban America.

Daniel Marcou, creator of this web site, is a corrections librarian, creative writing instructor, and author. Please contact him by EMAIL if you would like to have your book of Street Fiction reviewed here.

Archives

DICE by T.N. Baker

By Daniel | September 28, 2007

Plot Overview (from the back of the book)

Wasaun has two loves: his beautiful girlfriend and rollin’ dice. But when he meets Tone, a dude from the same hood who has just as much game and lots of cash to back it up, the stakes grow high. Wasaun is caught in a choice between his life and his girl.

Readers Review
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Other street fiction titles by T.N. Baker

Topics: Gambling, T.N. Baker, Relationships, St. Martin's Griffin | No Comments

AROUND THE WAY GIRLS 4 by Dwayne S. Joseph, LaJill Hunt, and Roy Glenn

By Daniel | September 28, 2007

Plot Overview (from the back of the book)

There’s a saying that if you come from my part of town, that you’re from around the way. Around the Way Girls 4 is a look at the life of some street-smart women who think they have the world in the palm of their hands, but are about to find out that things aren’t always what they seem.

For talented artist Jovia Grant, life has gone from one extreme to the other. Being raised by a single mother living in a lavish home, her much needed break from home comes when she is accepted into a summer art program where she rediscovers old friends and meets a few new ones. Essence Bestselling Author La Jill Hunt brings the drama in Thug Passion as these two worlds collide and her family discovers she’s been learning more than art.

Once again, Dwayne S. Johnson weaves a dramatic tale of love and betrayal in All for Love. After the turmoil she’d suffered in her twenty years. Rayne is thankful for the safety and companionship given to her by her boo, Love. Unfortunately for Rayne, the drama and heartache are about to come back in her life in a major way, when she finds out she is pregnant with Quincy’s baby.

For Jada West it was All About the Money. From dancing at the best club, to becoming the city’s top Madame, whatever it took to make piles of paper, that’s what she was about. In this tale of power and money, Roy Glenn brings a different flavor to this around the way girl as Jada discovers that in the end, there is something more important than money.

Readers Review
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Get the latest street lit from Urban Books

Topics: Roy Glenn, Urban Books, Dwayne S. Joseph, LaJill Hunt, Brooklyn | No Comments

THEM by Nathan McCall

By Daniel | September 28, 2007

Plot Overview (from the back of the book)

The author of the bestselling memoir Makes Me Wanna Holler presents a profound debut novel – in the tradition of Tom Wolfe’s Bonfire of the Vanities and Zadie Smith’s White Teeth – that captures the dynamics of class and race in today’s urban integrated communities.

Nathan McCall’s novel Them tells a compelling story set in a downtown Atlanta neighborhood known for its main street, Auburn Avenue, which was once regarded as the “richest Negro street in the world.”

The story centers on Barlowe Reed, a single, fortysomething African American who rents a ramshackle house on Randolph Street, just a stone’s throw from the historic birth home of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Barlowe, who works as a printer, otherwise passes the time reading and hanging out with other men at the corner store. He shares his home and loner existence with a streetwise, twentysomething nephew who is struggling to get his troubled life back on track.

When Sean and Sandy Gilmore, a young white couple, move in next door, Barlowe and Sandy develop a reluctant, complex friendship as they hold probing – often frustrating – conversations over the backyard fence.

Members of both households, and their neighbors as well, try to go about their business, tending to their homes and jobs. However, fear and suspicion build – and clashes ensue – with each passing day, as more and more whites move in and make changes and once familiar people and places disappear.

Using a blend of superbly developed characters in a story that captures the essence of this country’s struggles with the unsettling realities of gentrification, McCall has produced a truly great American novel.

Readers Review
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More books by Nathan McCall

Topics: Race Issues, Nathan McCall, Atlanta | No Comments

AROUND THE WAY GIRLS 3: DOUBLE TROUBLE by Alisha Yvonne, Thomas Long, and Pat Tucker

By Daniel | September 28, 2007

Plot Overview (from the back of the book)

There’s a saying that if you come from my part of town, that you’re from around the way. Around the Way Girls 3: Double Trouble is a look at the life of some street-smart women who think they know it all, but are about to get the lesson of their lives.

Sugar and Candy Cane are twenty-four-year-old identical twins from around the way. These ladies aren’t as sweet as their names imply, and people quickly come to know them as double trouble. The Cane twins have a love-hate relationship which keeps them at odds, but when all hell breaks loose, there’s no question as to whether they’ll have each others backs.

As the daughters of the infamous gangster, Timmy Barnes, it was only natural that Tamara and Tamia would follow in his footsteps. However, in their pursuit of the spoils of the fast life, a family secret is unraveled that may tear their lives apart.

Twin sisters, Paris and Porsha McCain have a score to settle. When their sister, Alex, is found brutally beaten and dead on the streets of South Central L.A. in stead of waiting for the police to catch the killer, Paris and Porsha set out to exact their own kind of justice.

Readers Review
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More street lit from Urban Books

Topics: Pat Tucker, Los Angeles, Alisha Yvonne, Thomas Long, LA, Urban Books, Brooklyn | No Comments

Two New Urban Fiction Books for Teens

By Miranda D. | September 28, 2007

Im so glad that authors are starting to write urban fiction especially for teens. The urban fiction, or street lit, genre is a relatively new one, and one that interests me because so many of my students ask for it. Many of the gritty adult titles, though, have graphic sex, rough language, and other content that makes it difficult to defend for my middle school audience. But new street lit titles aimed specifically at teens make my job much easier I can give students what they want books with urban characters, dramatic problems, and authentic language without getting into hot water.

K.C. Taylor is one such author of teen urban novels. She was kind enough to send me two of her books, Easier Without and Any Possible Outcome: A Book of Urban Tales. Both are published by GND Publishing.

Easier Without has two main characters Cell, a homeless boy with a troubled past, and the privileged Myla, who nevertheless has problems of her own. The two teens fall for each other, but face challenges. Myla discovers that an old boyfriend is HIV positive, and that she may be infected. Cell must struggle to survive and take care of his twin sister, while dealing with his mothers long-ago death and his incarcerated fathers criminal past. The story is fast-paced, and the writing has a feel that is very similar to that of adult urban fiction sometimes less polished than more mainstream fiction, but always full of emotion and brimming with the drama readers crave. Though the characters deal with mature situations, the language is appropriate for teenagers. Readers will root for Myla and Cell as they struggle to overcome their problems and make their love last.

Any Possible Outcome: A Book of Urban Tales is a book of short stories. In one story, a boy regrets involving his younger brother in gang activity. In another, a new girl in school deals with middle school friendships and intrigue. Poems, instant messaging, diary entries, and lots of dialogue spice up the narration. I especially enjoyed Minus 15, a story from the point of view of a teenage boy describing his involvement in selling drugs and how he ended up in a correctional facility. His regrets are clear without becoming preachy.

I know both of these books will be a hit with my students, and I hope to see more titles for teens from K.C. Taylor and other writers in the future.

If you are interested in urban fiction or library service for teens, check out Miranda Doyle’s website, www.teenlibrarian.com.

Topics: Miranda Doyle, K.C. Taylor, Books for Teens, Librarians, Guest Reviewer | No Comments

THE LAST STREET NOVEL by Omar Tyree (Interview)

By Daniel | September 26, 2007

Omar Tyree talks about his most recent novel The Last Street Novel

Check out all of the street fiction by Omar Tyree

Topics: Interview, Omar Tyree, YouTube, Video | No Comments

HOOD: AN URBAN EROTIC TALE by Noire

By Daniel | September 26, 2007

Plot Overview (from the back of the book)

Lamont “Hood” Mason is a fearless nineteen-year-old gansta who was born and raised in the projects of Brooklyn, New York. He was an abandoned child who roamed the cold city streets and fought hard for his survival. The only thing constant in his young life was the safety of a Brownsville barbershop owned by a father figure called Fat Daddy.

The barbershop is where Hood comes of age, but cutting hair isn’t the only thing Fat Daddy has going on. His daughter, Egypt, is the love of Hood’s young life, and the one person whose dreams of a stable future can lead him off the grimy urban corners and out of the hustling life.

But when Fat Daddy gets caught slippin and crosses paths with Xanbar, a notoriously brutal drug kingpin, his vices threaten to bring death down on the family Hood loves. In an effort to protect his own, Hood and his best friend and hustling partner, Dreko, take to the streets on a bloody mission that doesn’t go exactly as planned. Hood returns to find his world turned upside down by a wave of sex, violence, and betrayal. No longer the starving kid on the street, he’s now a man seeking vengence and retribution, and he might be forced to choose between bending or breaking as he picks up the shattered pieces of his life, one by one.

Readers Review
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More urban erotica from Noire

Topics: Urban erotica, Drug Dealing, Erotica, Atria Books, Brooklyn, New York, Noire | No Comments

AROUND THE WAY GIRLS 2 by KaShamba Williams, Thomas Long, and LaJill Hunt

By Daniel | September 26, 2007

Plot Overview (from the back of the book)

There’s a saying in Brooklyn that if you come from my part of town that you’re from around the way. Well Lyric, Juicy and Precious are all from around the way. They all live in Crown Heights, one of the most notorious sections of Brooklyn, but to them it’s just a place they call home. Around the Way Girls 2 like it’s predecessor Around the Way Girls is a fast paced look at the life of some street smart women who think that they know it all but are about to get the lessons of their lives.

Lyric Crenshaw has been playing the game so long that she’s mastered it. Her motto has always been to use what you got to get what you want. With a face and a body like hers, the possibilities are endless. But when a love struck co-worker teaches her otherwise and she meets a man that sees right through her, she may just have to open her eyes and see that winning the game ain’t everything.

If Juicy Brown were to die today, her obituary would read, “Another Welfare Recipient Bites the Dust,” but things have got to change. She may agree with some of the rumors buzzing around the neighborhood about her but one, is straight up scandalous! And she’s about to clear it up by any means necessary.

Precious Paine, a ghetto jewel haunted by memories of a troubled childhood. Her and her crew have the game on smash, but trouble lurks around her corner. Can the love of a good man make precious leave behind her hustle in the streets or will she become another victim of inner city life that’s marked for self destruction? These questions and many more will be answered in this high-energy urban street saga.

Readers Review
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Read all the Around the Way Series

Topics: Thomas Long, KaShamba Williams, Urban Books, LaJill Hunt, Brooklyn | No Comments

DANGEROUS by Leo Sullivan

By Daniel | September 26, 2007

Plot Overview (from the back of the book)

Gina Thomas is a gangsta’s girl, down for whatever. Even after her man, Jack Lemon, is cased up, Gina does what she has to do, holding it down for herself and her man. When Jack wins his appeal, vengence is no longer just for the Lord.

A vindictive cycle of mayhem and murder catapults Jack and Gina to the Forefront of DieHard Records, a multi-million dollar empire. But when the headless body of industry rival Damon Dice is discovered, Top Cop Anthony Brown finds himself pursuing both the truth behind the crime and one of the suspects – as he and Gina flirt in a deadly game of cat and mouse.

The twists continue as Gina meets Georgia Mae, a.k.a. Game, a crazy –sexy-cool white chick and exotic dancer with a bodacious body and a fetish for chocolate men. If Gina and her girl Monique only knew what lengths Game would go to get a man…

With time running out and the feds closing in, Jack and Gina have one last dangerous trick up their sleeves. Will it work?

Readers Review
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More urban fiction by Leo Sullivan

Topics: Leo Sullivan, Strippers, Music, Triple Crown Publications, Brooklyn | No Comments

Ghetto Literature 101 (video)

By Daniel | September 24, 2007

Heres an interesting video thats critical of ghetto lit that I found on YouTube. What do you think?

 Ghetto Literature 101 (YouTube)

Topics: Criticism, YouTube, Video, Street Fiction | No Comments

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