Toolbox
- size +

Search goes on for Hurricane Felix victims

A Miskito woman looks at the rubble around her home which was destroyed by Hurricane Felix in Krukira 430 kms northeast of Managua 06 September 2007. Authorities scoured Friday the Caribbean coastline of Nicaragua and Honduras for more victims of Hur ...
A Miskito woman looks at the rubble around her home, which was destroyed by Hurricane Felix in Krukira, 430 kms northeast of Managua, 06 September 2007. Authorities scoured Friday the Caribbean coastline of Nicaragua and Honduras for more victims of Hurricane Felix, which has left at least 100 dead so far.

Authorities scoured Friday the Caribbean coastline of Nicaragua and Honduras for more victims of Hurricane Felix, which has left at least 100 dead so far.
Another nine people have been found dead in Mexico after the country was struck on its Pacific Coast by Hurricane Henriette.

In Nicaragua, whose Mosquito Coast took a direct hit from the monstrous hurricane on Tuesday, President Daniel Ortega indicated that rescuers could make more grisly discoveries.

"It is worse than we previously thought," he said during a meeting with government and military officials on Thursday.

"Many families stayed in their homes. There are many victims, many dead," he said without disclosing a toll.

The bodies of 52 Miskito Indians living in Nicaragua's coast were found floating in Honduran waters on Thursday.

"We have found 52 bodies so far, but the people conducting searches in the sea say there are many more," Marco Burgos, the head of the Disaster Prevention Committee, told AFP.

The latest discovery brought the death toll from the storm to at least 100 people, while another 120 people remained missing, Nicaraguan and Honduran officials said.

But residents of Nicaragua's impoverished North Atlantic Autonomous Region believe the number of people who have disappeared is in the hundreds.

Rescuers and aid workers have struggled to reach remote villages, making it difficult to determine the full extent of the death and destruction.

The storm at its peak Tuesday reached the highest possible category five strength on the Saffir-Simpson scale.

Nicaragua's government has appealed to the international community for help, estimating that reconstruction would cost 30 million dollars.

Ortega said 10,000 homes have been destroyed or damaged, while 50,000 people had lost everything they owned. He said the extent of the destruction will likely go up.

The European Union announced it would send 1.3 million dollars in emergency aid to help the relief effort in Nicaragua, while the World Food Program has delivered more than 200,000 tonnes of provisions.

Water wells are contaminated while the region has remained without power since Tuesday.

The remnants of Felix, meanwhile, continued to pour rain over Central America, raising fears of deadly flooding.

A few streets and markets of Tegucigalpa were flooded, killing at least two people in the Honduran capital.

In northwest Honduras, the Ulua and Chamelecon rivers overflowed in the wealthy Valle de Sula farming and industrial region, flooding and isolating some villages without causing any immediate deaths.

In Guatemala, more than 850 people were evacuated from the Caribbean coast town of Izabal due to flooding.

In Mexico, nine people were killed in the wake of Hurricane Henriette, which swept across Baja California's popular Cabo tourist areas before plowing into the country's northern regions, slowing as it crossed the US border. Some 5,000 people remained in shelters in Mexico.

© 2007 AFP
» Next Article in Space & Earth science - Environment: Great Lakes cleanup may reap big benefits

would you recommend this story?

 

User Rating

Not rated yet
  • not at all
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • highly

Leave a Comment

You need to be registered at PhysOrgForum to add your comments.
If you do not have a username / password please register here !
Registration is very simple and will not take much time!