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Roy gets call he's in Hall
Record-setting goaltender says being selected his 'crowning achievement'

Patrick Roy hoists the Stanley Cup after Game 7 of the 2001 Stanley Cup Finals in Denver when the Colorado Avalanche beat the New Jersey Devils 3-1. Roy was elected to the Hockey Hall of Fame today.
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The winningest goaltender in NHL history was heavily involved in the European draft Wednesday for the junior hockey team he co-owns and coaches when his work was interrupted by a fairly significant phone call.

Former Avalanche star Patrick Roy, who, counting the playoffs, won 702 games in 18 NHL seasons, was one of four men selected for the Hockey Hall of Fame. The induction ceremony is set for Nov. 13 in Toronto.

"It's a great day," Roy said from Quebec during a conference call. "It's the crowning achievement for me."

Also named were Dick Duff, an "Original Six" forward who retired in 1972 after an 18-season career in which he collected 283 goals and won six Stanley Cups with Toronto and Montreal; the late Herb Brooks, the "Miracle on Ice" coach who led the U.S. Olympic team to a gold medal in 1980; and Harley Hotchkiss, a Calgary Flames part owner who was a member of the group that moved the franchise from Atlanta in 1980.

Roy, 40, retired after the 2002-03 season and was the only player selected in his first year of eligibility.

Roy said, "2006 has been a really solid year for me." In addition to the news Wednesday, Roy's Quebec Remparts won the recent Memorial Cup tournament - it's the equivalent of the Stanley Cup for junior hockey - for the first time in 35 years.

Roy spent his first 10 1/2 seasons with Montreal and won two Stanley Cups with the Canadiens before the stunning Dec. 6, 1995, trade that sent him to the Avalanche. He won two Cups in 7 1/2 seasons in Colorado and moved past Terry Sawchuk for the most regular-season wins in league history with No. 448 on Oct. 17, 2000.

"I consider myself extremely privileged," said Roy, whose No. 33 sweater was retired by the Avalanche and raised to the Pepsi Center rafters Oct. 28, 2003. "I also was extremely privileged to play with quality players that I had over those years."

Roy left a legacy that will be hard to match, and not just because of his NHL goalie records for regular-season games played (1,029), victories in the regular season (551) and playoffs (151), along with his four Stanley Cups, three Vezina trophies as the league's best goalie and a record three Conn Smythe trophies as most valuable player in the postseason.

The Quebec City native was a pioneer in the art of goaltending, even if he wasn't the first to employ the "butterfly" style in which a goalie splits his pads and drops to the ice to cover the bottom of the net.

Roy is considered the man who perfected it, and many aspiring goalies, especially from French-speaking Quebec, patterned their style after him.

"I remember when I was drafted by Montreal (in the third round in 1984), they were sending me tapes of goal- tenders," he said. "They wanted me to play 'stand up.' My first year, when I started to practice with Montreal, I was on the ice and I was going butterfly and diving for every puck. (Coach) Jacques Lemaire said, 'Do you need a mattress and a pillow?'

"I was a believer in the butterfly. Most of the goals being scored were along the ice, so I felt it was an advantage to use the butterfly."

Roy lived for the playoffs, won his first Stanley Cup as a 20-year-old in 1986 and posted 10 overtime wins on the way to another championship in 1993.

Six months after his trade to the Avalanche, Roy helped lead the team to the Stanley Cup in 1996, making 63 saves in a 1-0, triple-overtime triumph against Florida to complete a four-game sweep in the Finals. Roy helped the Avalanche win again in 2001.

"I always enjoyed the playoffs," he said. "That's what you were playing for, chasing that Stanley Cup. It was a lot easier for me to concentrate and to be focused in the playoffs than it was in the regular season. The outcome of every game was so important."

Roy probably never would have made his way to Colorado if he hadn't lashed out at then-Canadiens coach Mario Tremblay for leaving him in for nine goals on 26 shots in an eventual 11-1 loss to Detroit on Dec. 2, 1995, at the Montreal Forum.

Roy was humiliated. He stormed past Tremblay on the bench after finally getting pulled, walked up to team president Ronald Corey in his front-row seat and said: "This is my last game for Montreal."

Roy joined the Avalanche four days later, along with forward Mike Keane, in a trade that sent goalie Jocelyn Thibault and two forwards, Martin Rucinsky and Andrei Ko- valenko, to Montreal.

The deal reunited Roy with Avalanche general manager Pierre La- croix, his former agent.

"The opportunity to go to Colorado, being with Pierre Lacroix as the GM and knowing that his mission was to win a Stanley Cup, it was the perfect fit for me," he said, adding that the trade "gave me a second wind to my career.

"I was really fortunate to be traded with Mike Keane. He became my next-door neighbor and he really helped me a lot. I remember going on the plane and being nervous about the trade and the challenge of going there and the expectations. Mike said, 'Just be yourself, people will love you in Colorado.' I felt he was a really big support to me."

Lacroix, who has stepped down as Avalanche GM but remains as team president, said in a statement:

"Patrick Roy is a true legend of the game. He is a unique inductee for the Hockey Hall of Fame as one who truly influenced and redefined the goaltending position.

"The contributions he made to our organization and community will never be forgotten, and the images of Patrick hoisting the Cup in 1996 and 2001 will live in our minds forever."

Patrick Roy's statistics

Regular season

Season Team GP W L T GA SO AVG

1984-85 Montreal 1 1 0 0 0 0 0.00

1985-86 Montreal 47 23 18 3 148 1 3.35

1986-87 Montreal 46 22 16 6 131 1 2.93

1987-88 Montreal 45 23 12 9 125 3 2.90

1988-89 Montreal 48 33 5 6 113 4 2.47

1989-90 Montreal 54 31 16 5 134 3 2.53

1990-91 Montreal 48 25 15 6 128 1 2.71

1991-92 Montreal 67 36 22 8 155 5 2.36

1992-93 Montreal 62 31 25 5 192 2 3.20

1993-94 Montreal 68 35 17 11 161 7 2.50

1994-95 Montreal 43 17 20 6 127 1 2.97

1995-96 Mon/Col 61 34 24 2 165 2 2.76

1996-97 Colorado 62 38 15 7 143 7 2.32

1997-98 Colorado 65 31 19 13 153 4 2.39

1998-99 Colorado 61 32 19 8 139 5 2.29

1999-00 Colorado 63 32 21 8 141 2 2.28

2000-01 Colorado 62 40 13 7 132 4 2.21

2001-02 Colorado 63 32 23 8 122 9 1.94

2002-03 Colorado 63 35 15 13 137 5 2.18

Totals 1029 551 315 131 2546 66 2.52

Playoffs

Season Team GP W L GA SO AVG

1985-86 Montreal 20 15 5 39 1 1.92

1986-87 Montreal 6 4 2 22 0 4.00

1987-88 Montreal 8 3 4 24 0 3.35

1988-89 Montreal 19 13 6 42 2 2.09

1989-90 Montreal 11 5 6 26 1 2.43

1990-91 Montreal 13 7 5 40 0 3.06

1991-92 Montreal 11 4 7 30 1 2.62

1992-93 Montreal 20 16 4 46 0 2.13

1993-94 Montreal 6 3 3 16 0 2.56

1995-96 Colorado 22 16 6 51 3 2.10

1996-97 Colorado 17 10 7 38 3 2.21

1997-98 Colorado 7 3 4 18 0 2.51

1998-99 Colorado 19 11 8 52 1 2.59

1999-00 Colorado 17 11 6 31 3 1.79

2000-01 Colorado 23 16 7 41 4 1.70

2001-02 Colorado 21 11 10 52 3 2.41

2002-03 Colorado 7 3 4 16 1 2.27

Totals 247 151 94 584 23 2.28

or 303-892-2587

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