Inflation Conversion Factors for Dollars 1665 to Estimated 2017

by Robert Sahr

Consumer Price Index (CPI) conversion factors to determine the value of dollars of 1665 to estimated 2016 in dollars of 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, CPI (1982-84), and two special CPI measures, CPI-U-X1 (starting 1950), and CPI-U-RS (starting 1947).

To ease understanding of the value of dollar figures over time, the materials on this page “re-base” the official CPI from its current 1982-84 average base (= 1.000) to dollars of more recent years (for example, 2005 = 1.000).

On January 18, 2007 the 2006 inflation conversion factor tables (Excel and pdf) and the download conversion factors (Excel and pdf) were revised to reflect final CPI for 2006, released that day by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.  The inflation estimates on those tables for 2007 through 2016 are from early 2006, not yet 2007.  The tables will be revised and estimates extended to 2017 in February 2007, using updated inflation estimates from the Office of Management and Budget and the Congressional Budget Office.

Graphs will be revised beginning February 2007, to reflect final 2006 CPI.  Graphs now reflect the CPI for various years, as indicated.

The 2006 average CPI of 2.016 (alternately expressed as 201.6) was used to produce 2006 dollar conversion factors.

Note:  All inflation conversion factors use year-to-year inflation, not December-to-December inflation.  Final 2006 price level data are from Table 1A in the Bureau of Labor Statistics publication Consumer Price Index:  December 2006, available from the BLS web site (http://stats.bls.gov/cpi/) and, for convenience, at this link.

Inflation in 2006 was almost exactly what had been estimated early 2006 using the average of Office of Management and Budget and the Congressional Budget Office early 2006 estimates.  The 2006 CPI estimated February 2006 was 201.5, which would result in 2006 inflation of 3.17 percent.  The actual (final) CPI was 201.6, resulting in actual inflation of 3.23 percent.  Both of these round to 3.2 percent inflation, which is the degree of rounding used to produce these conversion factors.  So the final conversion factors differ insignificantly from those estimated early in 2006, based on the average of OMB and CBO inflation estimates for 2006.  This contrasts with early 2005 estimates of inflation for that year to be 2.4%, much lower than the actual 3.4%.  The same occurred in 2004.  The average of OMB and CBO estimates of 2004 inflation early in 2004 was 1.5%.  Actual 2004 inflation was 2.7%.

Inflation assumptions:  Inflation conversion factors for years 2007 and later assume 2.1% in 2007, and 2.2% in each year 2007 to 2016.  Estimates for 2007-2011 are the averages of inflation estimates from the President's Office of Management and Budget and Congressional Budget Office for each year as of early 2006; 2012-2016 are from only CBO because OMB did not project past 2011 in its 2007 Budget proposals.  The OMB and CBO will provide revised inflation estimates by February 2007.

Numerous graphs that use these conversion factors are available in the GRAPHS section.  Most graphs show the year of most recent revision, either with such labels as “[revised 2005]” or by the inclusion of the year in the link name.  All graphs will be revised beginning in February 2007 to reflect the most recent consumer price index and budget numbers.

For each set of graphs, all the graphs in that set have been assembled into pdf files to facilitate saving and printing, located at the end of that set.

Instructions about how to produce conversion factors for any base year are available here.  This might be useful for anyone who needs to produce dollars for a base year not shown here, for example, dollars of 1928 (that is, 1928 = 1.000).

Conversion factors use data from John J. McCusker and colleagues for the period 1665 to 1912.  Conversion factors for the years 1913 and later use CPI-U data from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics.  McCusker's offprint How Much Is That In Real Money?, revised 2001 (ISBN 1-929545-01-1) is available from the American Antiquarian Society for $15 plus shipping and handling through their web site

A journal article using these conversion factors is available at this location.

Adobe Acrobat Reader is needed to read items in pdf format.

An interesting discussion that denominates prices of selected items over time in terms of number of hours, days, or similar worked to purchase is available from the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, at http://www.dallasfed.org/fed/annual/1999p/ar97.pdf

A brief bibliography of books and other materials about cost of living and related concerns during various periods of American history is available here, in pdf format.

Data are revised periodically with adjustments and additions.  Suggestions are welcome.

Upcoming Changes:

All graphs will be revised beginning in February 2007, using final 2006 CPI and final 2006 budget and other data.  Because of the uncertainty of future revenue and spending estimates, most revised budget graphs will include data only through the year of the revision rather than for later years.  In addition, many graphs will include links to underlying data.

Note to users of Firefox and other non-Internet-Explorer web browsers:  In the forthcoming revision I will attempt to make all items accessible to users of non-Internet-Explorer browsers.  In the interim, Firefox users can access items on this page by downloading the “ieview” extension from Firefox.  Then right-click and select “open link target in IE” when opening a link.  Similar extensions might be available for other browsers.

The Excel and pdf files on this page should be accessible to users of all web browsers.

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Download Conversion Factors [all have been revised to reflect final 2006 CPI data but not yet updated for revised inflation estimates 2007 to 2017]

Excel file with column-format conversion factors 1665 to estimated 2016:  CPI (1982-84 Dollars), 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006 (final), CPI-U-X1 (2005 dollars), and CPI-U-RS (an experimental measure, using 2005 dollars).  This file contains conversion factors for each of those years and also inflation rates using CPI-U for years starting 1665, CPI-U-RS for years starting 1947, and CPI-U-X1 for years starting 1950.

For ease of printing, the Excel file also is available in pdf format:  Conversion factors 1665 to estimated 2016 (pdf format) (see below for original data)

These files incorporate analyses by John J. McCusker and others that provide estimates for the entire period starting in 1665.  Their data are the basis for the conversion but those authors do not provide those conversion factors provided here.

Data prior to 1913 are estimates; data for 1913 to the present involve data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, though the specific methods of data collection have changed during that period.  Use special caution concerning data prior to 1913.

It is strongly recommended that all dollar figures using these conversion factors for years prior to 1913 be rounded to no more than three significant digits, e.g., $14,663 becomes $14,700, and preferably—especially for early years—to two digits, that is, to $15,000.  Similarly, dollars derived for years 1913 to the present should be rounded to no more than three significant digits, that is, $14,660.

Stating dollar figure conversions in dollars and cents nearly always suggests more precision than the data allow.

The original data from John J. McCusker and the Bureau of Labor Statistics used to produce these conversion factors and an explanation of the conversion are available in pdf format original data for conversion factors 1665 to estimated 2016 (pdf format) .

See also the discussion by McCusker of the derivation and limits of his data at the Economic History Net.  The Economic History Net site also contains other sets of data, available here.

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Conversion Factor Tables (all have been revised to reflect final 2005 CPI data and early 2006 inflation estimates from the OMB and CBO)

Conversion factor tables are available as Portable Document Format (pdf) files and also in Excel format, for direct use in conversion.  In order to produce tables convenient for printing, the tables of conversion factors below cover only the period 1800 to estimated 2016.  Those wanting conversion factors for the entire period 1665 to estimated 2016 should use the Excel file above.

The 2005 conversion factors are based on final 2005 CPI.  Recommendation:  Use 2005 final conversion factors unless 2006 data are essential.  As noted above, final conversion factors in recent years have differed significantly from estimated conversion factors early in the year.

Conversion Factors in final 2006 Dollars for 1800 to estimated 2016

pdf                    Excel

Conversion Factors in 2005 Dollars for 1800 to estimated 2016

pdf                    Excel

Conversion Factors in 2005 Dollars, Using CPI-U-X1 for 1950 to estimated 2016 (CPI-U-X1 applies the post-1982 CPI to the period 1950 to 1982), with comparisons of inflation 1950 to 1982 using both CPI-U and CPI-U-X1 measures

pdf                    Excel  [note:  corrected May 25, 2006]

Conversion Factors in 2005 Dollars, Using CPI-U-RS for 1947 to 2005 (CPI-U-RS is research series, with 1977 = 100, extended to 1947 by the Census Bureau), re-based here to 2005 = 1.000

pdf                    Excel

Conversion Factors in 2005 Dollars, Using both CPI-U-X1 and CPI-U-RS for 1947 to estimated 2016 (combines the previous two tables, but omits inflation comparison 1950-1982)

pdf                    Excel

Conversion Factors in 2004 Dollars for 1800 to estimated 2016

pdf                    Excel

Conversion Factors in 2003 Dollars for 1800 to estimated 2016

pdf                    Excel

Conversion Factors in 2002 Dollars for 1800 to estimated 2016

pdf                    Excel

Conversion Factors in 2001 Dollars for 1800 to estimated 2016

pdf                    Excel

Conversion Factors in 2000 Dollars for 1800 to estimated 2016

pdf                    Excel

Conversion Factors in 1999 Dollars for 1800 to estimated 2016

pdf                    Excel

Conversion Factors in 1998 Dollars for 1800 to estimated 2016

pdf                    Excel

Conversion Factors in 1997 Dollars for 1800 to estimated 2016

pdf                    Excel

Conversion Factors in 1996 Dollars for 1800 to estimated 2016

pdf                    Excel

Conversion Factors in 1995 Dollars for 1800 to estimated 2016

pdf                    Excel

Conversion Factors in CPI [1982-84] Dollars for 1800 to estimated 2016

pdf                    Excel

Original data for the CPI-U-RS are available from the Bureau of Labor Statistics

(Conversion factors for years prior to 1913 should be considered estimates. In addition, CPI measures have changed over time, so data for the entire period are not precisely comparable. Note that conversion factors that apply the post-1982 CPI to the period 1950 to 1982 are available above as the CPI-U-X1, in 2004 dollars.)

A complete list of monthly CPI-U data with semi-annual and annual changes from 1913 to the present is available at this Bureau of Labor Statistics web site

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graphs (except as specifically noted, these have NOT yet been revised to reflect final 2005 CPI data; data for non-revised graphs are from 2004 or earlier years.  Those that have been revised are labeled “[revised 2005]”)

Except as noted, the graphs print best in “landscape” (horizontal, wide) print format.

Charts on the following topics are presented below and are available either by scrolling down or by selecting the appropriate link:

            Price levels and the US economy [nearly all have been revised to reflect final 2005 CPI]

            Millionaires Then and Now

            Pay of Presidents and Members of Congress [revised 2005 to reflect final 2004 data]

      Selected Government-related Items (number of government employees, Social Security and AFDC/TANF; stamp prices, minimum wage, mean and median family income)

            Presidential Election Costs 1860 to 2000

      National Government Budget:  Outlays (Spending), Revenue, Deficits or Surpluses, and National Debt

            Selected Commodity Prices (gasoline and gold) [gasoline revised in 2006 to reflect final 2005 data and gasoline prices to August 2006]

            Movies

            Budget Details

Price Levels and the US Economy

*  Price levels 1665 to 2005, with 2005 = 100 [revised to reflect final 2005 CPI; reminder:  pre-1913 price levels are estimates; BLS CPI data began 1913]

*  Price levels 1665 to 2005, with 2005 = 100 (logarithmic scale to show rate of change) [revised to reflect final 2005 CPI]

*  Price levels 1665 to 1914, with 2005 = 100 [revised to reflect final 2005 CPI]

*  Price levels 1915 to estimated 2014with 2003 = 100 [not yet revised to reflect final 2005 CPI]

*  Yearly price changes (inflation and deflation) 1915 to 2005 (yearly change in price level, in percent) [revised to reflect final 2005 CPI]

*  Yearly price changes (inflation and deflation) 1665 to 1914 (yearly change, in percent) [revised to reflect final 2005 CPI]

*  US gross domestic product (size of economy) 1789 to 2005, in current and constant (2005) dollars [not yet revised to reflect final 2005 CPI]

*  Regarding the size of the US economy, see also Economic History Net

*  Summary pdf file with all charts in this price level and economy section [not yet revised to reflect final 2005 CPI]

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Millionaires Then and Now

*  Dollars Needed Each Year 1850 to 2003 to Equal in Value $1 Million in Dollars of the Year 2002

*  Value in Dollars of the Year 2002 of $1 Million Each Year 1850 to 2003

*  Net Worth of Selected Wealthy Americans 1831 to 1996 in Inflation-adjusted (2002) Dollars

*  Number of US Millionaires and Value of $1 Million in Dollars of the Year 2002 for Selected Years 1848 to 1988

*  Summary pdf file with all charts in this millionaire section

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Pay of Presidents and Members of Congress [revised 2005]

*  Presidential Pay 1789 to 2005, in Current and Constant (2004) Dollars

*  Average Pay of Each President George Washington to George W. Bush, in Current and Constant (2004) Dollars  [Note:  prints best in portrait format]

*  Ranked Average Pay of Each President George Washington to George W. Bush, in Constant (2004) Dollars  [Note:  prints best in portrait format]

*  Presidential Pay in Dollars of 2004 and Ratio of CEO Compensation to Presidential Pay, Selected Years 1960 to 2003

*  Pay of Members of Congress 1789 to 2005, in Current and Constant (2004) Dollars

*  Ratio of the Pay of Members of Congress to Median Family Income, 1947 to 2003

*  Ratio of the Compensation of Top 500 CEOs to Pay of Members of Congress and Median Family Income, 1960 to 2003

*  Presidential and Vice Presidential Salaries 1789 to the present, from Congressional Quarterly’s Guide to the Presidency, are available here

*  Summary pdf file with all charts in this pay of presidents and members of Congress section

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Selected Government-Related Items

*  Change in Number of National Government Executive Branch Civilian Employees by Presidential Term, 1950 to 2002

*  Average Monthly Benefits for Social Security Couple and AFDC/TANF Family 1936 to 2004, in Inflation-Adjusted (2004) Dollars [revised 2005]

*  Stamp Prices 1863 to 2003, in Current and Constant Cents

*  Minimum Wage 1938 to 2003, in Current and Constant (2002) Dollars

*  Mean and Median Family Income 1947 to 2001, in Current and Constant (2002) Dollars

*  Inflation-adjusted Mean and Median Family Income 1948 to 2000, actual and extrapolated as if 1947-1972 trends had continued to 2000, in Constant (2000) Dollars (Census Bureau Data)

*  Summary pdf file with all charts in this selected government-related items section

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Presidential Election Costs in Current and Constant (2002) dollars, 1860 to 2000 and Value of 1974 Contribution Limits

*  Total spending by both parties in presidential election campaigns 1860 to 2000, in current and constant (2002) dollars

*  Spending by Republican and Democratic parties in presidential election campaigns 1860 to 2000, in constant (2002) dollars

*  Value Needed to Equal Campaign Contribution Limits of 1974 in Inflation-Adjusted Dollars of Each Year 1975 to 2003

*  Inflation-adjusted Value of 1974 Campaign Contribution Limits Each Year 1975 to 2003

*  Summary pdf file with all charts in this presidential election costs and campaign contribution limits section

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National Government Budget:  Outlays (Spending), Revenue, Deficits or Surpluses, and National Debt

Note that the inflation conversion factors are based on calendar year rather than national government budget year (fiscal year, often abbreviated FY).  Because this applies to all years, no distortions should result from the minor divergence.  The national government budget year begins October 1 and is named after the calendar year in which it ends.  Until 1976 the national government budget year began July 1.  (The period July 1 to September 30, 1976 is called the “transitional quarter,” sometimes abbreviated TQ.)

*  National Government Outlays (Spending), Revenues, and Resulting Deficits or Surpluses in Billions of Constant (2002) Dollars, 1792 through 1902

*  National Government Outlays (Spending), Revenues, and Resulting Deficits or Surpluses in Billions of Constant (2002) Dollars, 1902 through 2002

*  National Government Outlays (Spending) in Constant (2002) Dollars and as Percent of the National Economy, 1792 to 2002

*  Per Person National Government Outlays (Spending) and National Debt (Accumulated Deficits) in Constant (2002) Dollars, 1792 to 2002

*  Change in National Government Outlays (Spending) by Presidential Term 1952 through estimated 2004, in Constant Dollars, Using CPI-U-X1, which applies the post-1982 CPI measure to the entire period

*  National Debt in Billions of Current and Constant (2002) Dollars and as Percent of the National Economy, 1792 through 2002

*  Change in National Debt by Presidential Term, 1952 through estimated 2004, in Constant Dollars, Using CPI-U-X1, which applies the post-1982 CPI measure to the entire period

*  National Government Outlays, Revenues, and Resulting Deficits or Surpluses as Percent of the National Economy, 1930 through 2002

*  Mandatory and Discretionary Composition of National Government Budget Outlays as Percent of Total Outlays, 1962 to estimated 2004

*  Yearly Inflation-adjusted Change in Discretionary Outlays, 1962 to estimated 2004, in Percent

*  Yearly Inflation-adjusted Change in Mandatory and Net Interest Outlays, 1962 to estimated 2004, in Percent

*  Inflation-adjusted Change in Mandatory, Discretionary, and Interest Outlays by Presidential Term, 1964 to estimated 2004, in Percent

*  Composition of Mandatory Spending, by Percent, 1964 to estimated 2008, in Percent

*  Composition of Discretionary Spending, by Percent, 1964 to estimated 2008, in Percent

*  Composition of National Government Budget Outlays for “Big Five” (Social Security, Defense, Interest, Medicare, Medicaid) and for Everything Else, 1962 to estimated 2004

*  Inflation-adjusted Change in Outlays for Selected Categories of National Government Spending per Person, by Presidential Term Johnson to George W. Bush, in percent (this examines inflation-adjusted spending per person, that is, total spending divided by US population, not per recipient; the changes are examined in more detail at the bottom of this page, or via this link)

*  Summary pdf file with all charts in this national government budget section

*  Detailed examination of National Government Budget Outlays for “Big Five” and other items is available at the bottom of this page, or via this link

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Selected Commodity Prices

*       Price of Gasoline 1950 to 2006, in Current and Constant (2005) Cents [pdf file, revised August 2006 to reflect final 2005 data and gasoline prices to August 2006]

NOTE:  Gasoline prices in inflation-adjusted dollars in 2006 approach the previous peak, in 1981.  To exceed the inflation-adjusted 1981 price, gasoline prices in 2006 must reach $3.08 if 2006 inflation is 3% and $3.14 if inflation is 5%.

*  Price of Gold 1786 to 2005, in Current and Constant (2004) Dollars [revised 2005]

*  Regarding the price of gold, several series, starting 1257, see also the Economic History Net

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Movies

*  Movie ticket prices for selected years 1948-2002 (from the National Association of Theatre Owners)

      Box office receipts for various movies in current and constant dollars can be obtained from several sites:

*  The-Movie-Times

*  Mr. Showbiz

      The following site discusses difficulties of calculating movie box office receipts in inflation-adjusted dollars:

*  Movieweb

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Budget Details

            The following sections show national government spending for the “Big 5” items (Social Security, defense, net interest, Medicare, and Medicaid) and selected other components of the national government budget in the following details:  (1) Outlays in current and constant (2002) dollars 1940 to estimated 2008; (2) Year-by-year changes in outlays in constant (2002) dollars and, in most instances, as percent of outlays and as percent of mandatory or discretionary outlays (the division of national government outlays into “mandatory” and “discretionary” categories began with the 1962 budget year; discretionary spending is that part of the budget controlled through yearly appropriation bills of president and Congress); and (3) changes in outlays by presidential term, 1940 to estimated 2004.  The current-dollar (non-inflation-adjusted) data for most of these tables are drawn from Budget of the United States 2004 Historical Tables, which is available here. (Data from the 2005 Budget are available here and will be used in revising these graphs.)  Also used is the Congressional Budget Office Budget and Economic Outlook 2004-2014, available at the CBO web site.

Note:  Because of the uncertainty about future spending, budget details include data only through final 2004 or estimated 2005 rather than for later budget years, as was presented in previous versions of this page.

Social Security and Medicare (trust fund items, paid by “contributions,” which are “pigeon-holed” for these programs); in recent years Social Security is the largest category of national government spending and Medicare usually is the third largest

*  Outlays for Social Security and Medicare, 1940 to estimated 2008, in Billions of Current and Constant (2002) dollars

*  Social Security and Medicare:  Yearly inflation-adjusted Change and as Percent of Outlays, 1940 to estimated 2004

*  Inflation-adjusted Change in Social Security and Medicare by Presidential Term, 1940 to estimated 2004 in Percent

*  Summary pdf file with all charts in this Social Security and Medicare section

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National Defense (the largest general fund—also called “federal fund”—budget category, paid from general revenues, not trust funds); in recent years it is the second largest category (after Social Security) of national government spending; with additional spending added in future years, national defense might again become the largest category

*  Outlays for National Defense, 1940 to estimated 2008, in Billions of Current and Constant (2002) dollars

*  National Defense:  Yearly inflation-adjusted Change and as Percent of Outlays, 1952 to estimated 2004

*  Inflation-adjusted Change in National Defense by Presidential Term, 1944 to estimated 2004, in Percent

*  Summary pdf file with all charts in this national defense section

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Net Interest and Medicaid (both are federal fund budget items, paid from general revenues, not trust funds); in recent years net interest is the fourth or fifth largest category of national government spending, alternating with Medicaid

*  Outlays for Net Interest and Medicaid, 1940 to estimated 2008, in Billions of Current and Constant (2002) dollars

*  Interest on the National Debt:  Yearly inflation-adjusted Change and as Percent of Outlays, 1940 to estimated 2004

*  Medicaid:  Yearly inflation-adjusted Change and as Percent of Outlays, 1960 to estimated 2004

*  Inflation-adjusted Change in Interest and Medicaid Outlays by Presidential Term, 1940 to estimated 2004

*  Summary pdf file with all charts in this net interest and Medicaid section

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Health Care (includes both trust funds [Medicare] and Federal Funds [Medicaid and others])

*  National Government Outlays for Health Care, 1940 to estimated 2008, in Billions of Current and Constant (2002) dollars

*  National Government Health Care Outlays:  Yearly inflation-adjusted Change and as Percent of Outlays, 1940 to estimated 2004

*  Inflation-adjusted Change in National Government Health Care Outlays by Presidential Term, 1940 to estimated 2004

*  Summary pdf file with all charts in this health care section

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Social Insurance and Public Assistance (includes both trust fund and federal fund items)

*  National Government Outlays for Social Insurance and Public Assistance, 1940 to estimated 2008, in Billions of Current and Constant (2002) dollars

*  National Government Social Insurance and Public Assistance Outlays:  Yearly inflation-adjusted Change and as Percent of Outlays, 1940 to estimated 2004

*  Inflation-adjusted Change in National Government Social Insurance and Public Assistance Outlays by Presidential Term, 1940 to estimated 2004

Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC), changed to Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) by 1996 legislation, and Food Stamps (both are federal fund items, paid from federal funds; each is about 1 percent of national government outlays); AFDC-TANF usually is labeled as the main national government “welfare” program

*  National Government Outlays for AFDC-TANF and Food Stamps, 1940 to estimated 2008, in Billions of Current and Constant (2002) dollars

*  National Government AFDC-TANF and Food Stamp Outlays:  Yearly inflation-adjusted Change and as Percent of Outlays, 1940 to estimated 2004

*  Inflation-adjusted Change in National Government Outlays for AFDC-TANF and Food Stamps by Presidential Term, 1940 to estimated 2004

*  Summary pdf file with all charts in this social insurance and public assistance section

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Change in Various Categories of National Government Spending—total outlays, defense, net interest, means-tested social spending, non-means-tested social spending, and other—adjusted for inflation and population (spending for each divided by total US population, not spending per recipient), 1962 to estimated 2004.  This follows the suggestion of candidate George W. Bush, who said during the 2000 election campaign that state, and presumably national, government spending over time should be adjusted both for inflation and population growth.  The current-dollar data are from the Congressional Budget Office (the report is available at the CBO web site) and begins with the 1962 budget year; change is from final year of previous term to final year of current term.

*  National Government Inflation-adjusted Spending (Outlays) per Person for Defense, Net Interest, Means-tested Social, Non-means-tested Social, “Other” (residual category), and Total National Government Spending 1962 to estimated 2004, in Constant (2002) dollars

*  National Government Inflation-adjusted Total Spending (Outlays) per Person, Each Year 1962 to estimated 2004, in Constant (2002) dollars

*  Inflation-adjusted Change in Total National Government Outlays per Person by Presidential Term, Johnson to George W. Bush, in percent

*  Inflation-adjusted Defense Spending (Outlays) per Person, Each Year1962 to estimated 2004, in Constant (2002) dollars

*  Inflation-adjusted Change in Defense Outlays per Person by Presidential Term, Johnson to George W. Bush, in percent

*  Inflation-adjusted Net Interest Spending (Outlays) per Person, Each Year1962 to estimated 2004, in Constant (2002) dollars

*  Inflation-adjusted Change in Net Interest Outlays per Person by Presidential Term, Johnson to George W. Bush, in percent

*  Inflation-adjusted Means-tested Social Spending (Outlays) per Person, Each Year1962 to estimated 2004, in Constant (2002) dollars (the largest means-tested social program is Medicaid)

*  Inflation-adjusted Change in Means-tested Social Outlays per Person by Presidential Term, Johnson to George W. Bush, in percent

*  Inflation-adjusted Non-means-tested Social Spending (Outlays) per Person, Each Year1962 to estimated 2004, in Constant (2002) dollars (the largest non-means-tested social programs are Social Security and Medicare)

*  Inflation-adjusted Change in Non-means-tested Social Outlays per Person by Presidential Term, Johnson to George W. Bush, in percent

*  Inflation-adjusted “Other” Spending (Outlays) per Person, Each Year1962 to estimated 2004, in Constant (2002) dollars (this is a residual category, and includes all national government spending not included in defense, net interest, means-tested social, and non-means-tested social categories; most of the items in this category are in the discretionary spending category)

*  Inflation-adjusted Change in “Other” Outlays per Person by Presidential Term, Johnson to George W. Bush, in percent

*  Inflation-adjusted National Government Outlays for Defense, Net Interest, Means-tested Social Spending, Non-means-tested Social Spending, and “Other,” in Billions of 2002 Dollars (Total Spending, Not Per Capita)

*  Summary pdf file with all charts in this Per Capita Government Spending section

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The Columbia Journalism Review uses the data from these pages to provide a “dollar conversion calculator” that calculates dollar figures by simply entering several numbers. To use that conversion calculator, go to:

http://www.cjr.org/tools/inflation

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Additional information about the Consumer Price Index, including recent and proposed changes, can be obtained from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics at Consumer Price Indexes Home Page, which includes a link to their “inflation calculator” that calculates inflation-adjusted dollar figures by simply entering several numbers.

Two additional sources of data are the Statistical Abstract of the United States and Statistical Resources on the Web (from the University of Michigan), both excellent starting points for statistics on a very wide range of topics.

 

Please send suggestions and corrections to Robert Sahr

*  Robert Sahr’s Homepage

*  The Political Science Department Homepage

*  The Oregon State University Homepage