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Wildcard (Screenplay Finalist)
Writer

Life After Greenlight
Episode 1

Come March 15th people will see the first episode of Project Greenlight, and see Wildcard as a 'top three' script fail to win. (I won't write the 'L' word...) They might think that's the end of the road for the script, and maybe for me.

They'd be wrong.

It was just the beginning. Wes Craven offered to buy Wildcard within minutes of the announcement that Feast won. In addition, Alix Taylor, who works with Wes, provided my script to an agent with whom I signed — an excellent agent.

Since then, I have spent spent three to four days a month in L.A., driving around, taking meetings, talking with producers and production executives, pitching ideas and listening to what they might have me work on. I currently have two projects in play — one an original idea of mine, the other an adaptation of a foreign film — on both of which I might actually get paid before I write.

Some impressions, after thirty or so studio meetings...you know that stereotype of the clueless Hollywood executive who doesn't know story but blathers on endlessly? I haven't met him or her yet. Uniformly, every exec and producer I've met has been smart, a student of movies, and is clear about what he or she wants. Sometimes the latter is not good news for me — they want something I'm not interested in doing, or vice versa — but they've all been professional, willing to listen, and good people. Now maybe that speaks to the quality of my agent and the meetings he gets me, rather than to the norm, but this has been my experience.

Secondarily, I've been to every major studio a couple of times. I've walked by Enterprise crewman on the Paramount lot, walked beside Geena Davis on the Disney lot, stood awestruck in front of the Thalberg Building on the Sony lot, and bought first release DVDs for nine bucks a pop in the Warner Bros. company store. Heaven. If my screenwriting career ended tomorrow, I'd have experiences to value for a lifetime.

But I don't expect it to end. Wildcard should go into production this year sometime, I've got two good spec scripts on the burner, and as I said, some deals in the works. By this time next year, words I wrote should be spoken on a screen, in a movie theatre in my town. It just doesn't get any better than that.
 
Related Links:
"Wildcard" Pitch Video
All Episode 1 Blogs
Episode 1 Main
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