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Stewart Wallis is nef's executive director

Stewart graduated in Natural Sciences from Cambridge University.  His career began in marketing and sales with Rio Tinto Zinc followed by a Masters Degree in Business and Economics at London Business School.  He then joined the World Bank in Washington DC working on industrial and financial development in East Asia.  His seven years at the World Bank also included a spell as Administrator of the Young Professionals Programme.  He then worked for Robinson Packaging in Derbyshire for nine years, the last five as Managing Director. Stewart joined Oxfam in 1992 as International Director with responsibility, latterly, for 2,500 staff in 70 countries and for all Oxfam's policy, research, development and emergency work worldwide.  He was awarded the OBE for services to Oxfam in 2002. 

After a brief spell as Oxfam's livelihoods Director, Stewart joined nef as executive director in November 2003. His interests include: global governance, the functioning of markets, the links between development and environmental agendas, and new forms of enterprise.

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Stewart Wallis

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executive director

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0207 820 6320

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