Technologies
AMR
AMR-WB (G.722.2)
VMR-WB
AMR-WB+
G.729
G.723.1
ACELP.net
Audio Samples
Related Standards Specifications

Since its incorporation in 1999, VoiceAge has been active in international standardization activities, participating in competitions for wideband standard codecs at ETSI/3GPP, 3GPP2 and ITU-T. In recognition of their superior quality, VoiceAge speech and audio codecs have consistently been selected as standards in these comparative competitions.

In fact, AMR-WB, G722.2, VMR-WB, and AMR-WB+ have all become standards since 1999, and they are now among the more than 15 international standards based on VoiceAge's flagship ACELP® technology platform.

 


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For the specific standards that recommend the VoiceAge coding technologies, click here, or click one of the following links:

The VoiceAge coding technologies are also specified as mandatory or recommended for a wide variety of applications. For a list of these standards, click here.

In addition, the 3GPP has defined the .3gp file format for use in packet-switched multimedia services like MMS and PSS, and the IETF has defined Real-Time Protocol payload formats for packetizing AMR, AMR-WB, VMR-WB and AMR-WB+ encoded audio signals into the RTP. The IETF recommendations also include media type registrations. For details, click here.

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Benefits of standards

Developed by international organizations that reflect the cooperation of both the public and private sectors, standards best meet the requirements and objectives defined by the industry, so they reduce risk and help to future-proof your products and services. Standards are selected after qualification and selection competitions, assuring that the selected codec is of the highest quality. The selection is then rigorously and extensively tested in a characterization phase, so its performance is well understood. This process creates trust and confidence in products where standards are used. Adhering to standards-based solutions also helps ensure interoperability, thereby encouraging widespread adoption of services and fostering market growth; and by eliminating the need for transcoding, this can reduce overall costs and improve overall quality. Standards have open source code, in both fixed- and floating-point arithmetic, which can be ported, evaluated, tested and used to develop applications. They are ready to implement, reducing time to market and removing the risks associated with depending on a single supplier.

Proprietary solutions, on the other hand, are basically “black box” solutions that are not necessarily widely tested. Their IPR is often unclear or unknown, and they may lock you into dependency on a single source, which can be expensive as well as high risk.

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Codec specification standards

These standards define the specifications of selected VoiceAge codecs:

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Application specification standards naming VoiceAge codecs

These standards require or recommend VoiceAge codecs in various applications:

  • 3GPP (1999) TS 26.111, “Codec for circuit switched multimedia telephony service; Modifications to H.324,” names AMR as the mandatory speech codec for (3G-324H) multimedia telephone handsets, and Release 6 in 2004 recommends support for AMR-WB. http://www.3gpp.org/ftp/Specs/html-info/26111.htm
  • 3GPP (2005) TS 26.140, “Multimedia Messaging Service (MMS); Media formats and codecs,” requires Multimedia Messaging Service (MMS) to support AMR when speech is supported and to support AMR-WB when wideband speech working at 16 kHz sampling frequency is supported. It also recommends that if MMS supports audio, it should support AMR-WB+.
    http://www.3gpp.org/ftp/Specs/html-info/26140.htm
  • 3GPP (2006) TS 26.141, “IP Multimedia Subsystem (IMS) Messaging and Presence; Media formats and codecs,” requires IMS Messaging and Presence to support AMR when speech is supported and to support AMR-WB when wideband speech working at 16 kHz sampling frequency is supported. It also recommends that if these services support audio, they should support AMR-WB+.
    http://www.3gpp.org/ftp/Specs/html-info/26141.htm
  • 3GPP (2005) TS 26.234, “Transparent end-to-end Packet-switched Streaming Service (PSS); Protocols and codecs,” requires packet-switched streaming (PSS) to support AMR when speech is supported and AMR-WB when wideband speech working at 16 kHz sampling frequency is supported. It also recommends that if packet-switched streaming (PSS) supports audio, it should support AMR-WB+.
    http://www.3gpp.org/ftp/Specs/html-info/26234.htm
  • 3GPP (2005) TS 26.235, “Packet switched conversational multimedia applications; Default codecs,” requires 3G packet-switched multimedia terminals supporting audio to support AMR and supporting wideband speech working at 16 kHz sampling frequency to support AMR-WB. In Annex D (Informative), it states that these codecs also apply for Push to talk Over Cellular (PoC).
    http://www.3gpp.org/ftp/Specs/html-info/26235.htm
  • 3GPP (2005) TS 26.346, “Multimedia Broadcast/Multicast Service (MBMS); Protocols and codecs,” states that MBMS clients that support speech should/shall support the AMR decoder, those that support wideband speech working at 16 kHz sampling frequency should/shall support the AMR-WB decoder, and those that support audio should support the AMR-WB+ decoder.
    http://www.3gpp.org/ftp/Specs/html-info/26346.htm
  • OMA (2004) “Multimedia Messaging Service Conformance Document” states that MMS clients that are compliant to the MMS suite of specifications defined by 3GPP must support AMR and those that are compliant to the 3GPP2 specifications must support at least one of 13K or AMR.
    http://www.openmobilealliance.org/release_program/index.html
  • CableLabs® (2006) PKT-SP-CODEC-MEDIA-I01-060406, “PacketCable Codec and Media Specification,” includes AMR as a supported narrowband codec and AMR-WB and VMR-WB as supported wideband codecs. For each of these codecs, the specification notes that using the codec guarantees end-to-end interoperability between User Equipment or Media Gateways and the related codec in the 3GPP or 3GPP2 cellular network.
    http://www.packetcable.com/downloads/specs/PKT-SP-CODEC-MEDIA-I01-060406.pdf

  • ETSI TS 102 005 V1.2.1 (2006-04), "Digital Video Broadcasting (DVB); Specification for the use of Video and Audio Coding in DVB services delivered directly over IP protocols," specifies AMR-WB+ for use in DVB services delivered over Internet Protocol and IP Datacast.
    http://www.dvb-h.org/technology.htm

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File format and RTP packet format definitions

These specifications define the .3gp file format for use in packet-switched streaming services like MMS and PSS and the Real-Time Protocol (RTP) payload formats for packetizing AMR, AMR-WB, VMR-WB and AMR-WB+ encoded audio signals into the RTP. The RTP payload format definitions enable use of the codecs in RTP packet-switched networks in applications like streaming, and they enable interoperability with existing codec transport formats on non-IP networks.

  • 3GPP (2005) RFC 26.244, “Transparent end-to-end packet switched streaming service (PSS); 3GPP file format (3GP),” defines the 3GPP (.3gp) file format used by PSS and MMS and explains how AMR, AMR-WB and AMR-WB+ audio information can be encapsulated in .3gp files.
    http://www.3gpp.org/ftp/Specs/html-info/26244.htm
  • IETF (2002) RFC 3267, “Real-Time Transport Protocol (RTP) Payload Format and File Storage Format for the Adaptive Multi-Rate (AMR) and Adaptive Multi-Rate Wideband (AMR-WB) Audio Codec,” specifies the payload format for packetizing AMR and AMR-WB encoded speech signals into the RTP. The payload format is designed to enable using the codec in RTP packet-switched networks in applications like VoIP and streaming, and it enables interoperability with existing AMR and AMR-WB transport formats on non-IP networks. In addition, a file format is specified for transport of AMR and AMR-WB speech data in storage mode applications such as email. Two separate MIME type registrations are included, one for AMR and one for AMR-WB, specifying use of both the RTP payload format and the storage format.
    http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc3267.txt
  • IETF (2006) RFC 4348, “Real-Time Transport Protocol (RTP) Payload Format for the Variable-Rate Multimode Wideband (VMR-WB) Audio Codec,” specifies an RTP payload format to be used for the VMR-WB speech codec. The payload format is designed to be able to interoperate with existing VMR-WB transport formats on non-IP networks. A media type registration for VMR-WB RTP payload format is included. This specification also shows how VMR-WB-enabled terminals can interoperate directly with AMR-WB terminals without transcoding.
    http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc4348.txt?number=4348
  • IETF (2006) RFC 4352, “RTP Payload Format for Extended AMR Wideband (AMR-WB+) Audio Codec,” specifies an RTP payload format for Extended AMR Wideband (AMR-WB+) encoded audio signals. The AMR-WB+ codec is an audio extension of the AMR-WB speech codec. It encompasses the AMR-WB frame types and a number of new frame types designed to support high quality music and speech. A media type registration for AMR-WB+ is included.
    http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc4352.txt?number=4352

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