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mohawk.bmp (166482 bytes)Geronimo Henry started a non-profit foundation in 1997, called "The Lost Generation" to raise money for more students. The foundation's symbol is three ribbons of three colours. The red, black, and white ribbons stand for hope and unity for all residential survivors. Anyone who contributes to the Foundation receives the symbolic ribbons. For donations call 519-445-2837.

Henry describes the significance of the ribbons colours, Red, he says, is for the colour of natives' skin, white is for the former students purity and innocence and black is for the hell they suffered at the residential school. The circle has no significance, as this was added only for identification purposes.

The Mohawk Institute was established in 1831 by the New England Co, a Protestant missionary society based in Britain, to convert and civilize the "wild" native. The school was later run by the Anglican Church and controlled by the federal Department of Indian and Northern Affairs. It wasn’t until the latter part of the 1800s that Ottawa took a leading role in the "education" of native children and made residential schools part of government policy.

When it opened, the Mohawk Institute was only meant to accommodate Six Nations' children, but its doors were later opened to all native students. The Institute, which now houses the Woodland Culture Centre, was among 80 residential schools across the country.

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Lorna McNaughton is one of hundreds of former students of the Mohawk Institute involved in a lawsuit against the Anglican Church of Canada


See Also the Aboriginal Healing Foundationheader.gif (16036 bytes)


LOST GENERATIONS

Victims of Residential Schools – Restoring Balance

Project Coordinator: Geronimo Henry

 

Funded By: Delivered By:

Aboriginal Healing Foundation Six Nations Health Services

PRESENTS

Traditional & Western/Conventional Healing Circles

 

Place: Odrohekta – “The Gathering Place” Six Nations Tourism located on Hwy #54 & Chiefswood Road

When: Every Wednesday evening starting September 26 to February 27, 2002

Time: 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.

 

1st half – Topic Presentation Sessions – All Ages Welcome

2nd half - Sharing Circles – Separate, Confidential discussion groups for Survivors

who must be 18 years of age & over

*Support Counsellors will be in attendance at each session*

Ida Martin, Cam Bomberry, Melba Thomas

 

Date Topic Presenter(s)

Week 1 – September 26 “Herbal Medicines”………………… …………….……..Roger Hill

Week 2 – October 3 Residential School Survivor”.…………………………..Calvin Sault

Week 3 – October 10 “Sharing & Meaning of Dreams”…………………….….Wendy Hill

Week 4 – October 17 ……………..……………………………………………… T.B.A.

Week 5 – October 24 “Meaning & Purpose of Treaties”………….…………..Beverly Jacobs

Week 6 – October 30 “Ceremonies” ……………………….…………Norma General & Winnie Thomas

Week 7 – November 7 “Clan Mothers” ……………………………………………Carol Bomberry

Week 8 – November 14 “Reclaiming the Spirit, After Sexual Abuse”……Sandy Montour & Peggy Logan

Week 9 – November 21 Traditional Parenting”…………………………………Christine Sky

Week 10 – November 28 “Various Fasting” ……………………………Jan Longboat, I da wa da di Project

Week 11 – December 5 Healthy Eating & Healthy Living”……Sandra Juutilainen,A/Health Promotion Advisor/Dietician

Week 12 – December 12 “Children of Alcoholics” …………………………Glenn Forrest, New Directions

Week 13 – January 9, 2002 “Intergenerational Survivor” …………………………Lyle Henry

Week 14 – January 16 Six Nations Mental Health Services ……….Dr. Cornelia Wieman, M.D., FRCPC

Week 15 – January 23 “Adoption”…………………………Elaine Vanevery, Children’s Aid Society-Native Services Branch

Week 16 – January 30 “Effects of Child Abuse”…………… Leslie Thomas, Children’s Aid Society-Native Services Branch

Week 17 – February 6 “Working Through Sexual Abuse”………….…Sandy Montour & Peggy Logan

Week 18 – February 13 “Replacing The Inner Child”…………………….Wanda Smith, Native Horizons

Week 19 – February 20 …………………………………………………………. T.B.A.

Week 20 – February 27 Performance by The New Orators Youth Project …..Darren Thomas, Project Manager

 

For more information please call:

LOST GENERATIONS/ Geronimo Henry, Project Coordinator

Six Nations Health Services, P.O. Box 5000, Ohsweken, ON N0A 1M0 Telephone: 519-445-1331 Fax: 519-445-0368

the above page from Six Nations Council - Lost Generation

Six Nations Council

 


armm1.gif (3804 bytes)Gathering Strength
Canada's Aboriginal Action Plan

Statement of Reconciliation

Learning from the Past

As Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Canadians seek to move forward together in a process of
renewal, it is essential that we deal with the legacies of the past affecting the Aboriginal peoples
of Canada, including the First Nations, Inuit and Métis. Our purpose is not to rewrite history but,
rather, to learn from our past and to find ways to deal with the negative impacts that certain
historical decisions continue to have in our society today.

The ancestors of First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples lived on this continent long before
explorers from other continents first came to North America. For thousands of years before this
country was founded, they enjoyed their own forms of government. Diverse, vibrant Aboriginal
nations had ways of life rooted in fundamental values concerning their relationships to the
Creator, the environment, and each other, in the role of Elders as the living memory of their
ancestors, and in their responsibilities as custodians of the lands, waters and resources of their
homelands.

The assistance and spiritual values of the Aboriginal peoples who welcomed the newcomers to
this continent too often have been forgotten. The contributions made by all Aboriginal peoples to
Canada’s development, and the contributions that they continue to make to our society today,
have not been properly acknowledged. The Government of Canada today, on behalf of all
Canadians, acknowledges those contributions.

Sadly, our history with respect to the treatment of Aboriginal people is not something in which
we can take pride. Attitudes of racial and cultural superiority led to a suppression of Aboriginal
culture and values. As a country, we are burdened by past actions that resulted in weakening the
identity of Aboriginal peoples, suppressing their languages and cultures, and outlawing spiritual
practices. We must recognize the impact of these actions on the once self-sustaining nations that
were disaggregated, disrupted, limited or even destroyed by the dispossession of traditional
territory, by the relocation of Aboriginal people, and by some provisions of the Indian Act. We
must acknowledge that the result of these actions was the erosion of the political, economic and
social systems of Aboriginal people and nations.

Against the backdrop of these historical legacies, it is a remarkable tribute to the strength and
endurance of Aboriginal people that they have maintained their historic diversity and identity.
The Government of Canada today formally expresses to all Aboriginal people in Canada our
profound regret for past actions of the federal government which have contributed to these
difficult pages in the history of our relationship together.

One aspect of our relationship with Aboriginal people over this period that requires particular attention is the Residential School system. This system separated many children from their families and communities and prevented them from speaking their own languages and from learning about their heritage and cultures. In the worst cases, it left legacies of personal pain and distress that continue to reverberate in Aboriginal communities to this day. Tragically, some children were the victims of physical and sexual abuse.

The Government of Canada acknowledges the role it played in the development and
administration of these schools. Particularly to those individuals who experienced the tragedy of sexual and physical abuse at residential schools, and who have carried this burden believing that in some way they must be responsible, we wish to emphasize that what you experienced was not your fault and should never have happened. To those of you who suffered this tragedy at residential schools, we are deeply sorry.


In dealing with the legacies of the Residential School system, the Government of Canada
proposes to work with First Nations, Inuit and Métis people, the Churches and other interested
parties to resolve the longstanding issues that must be addressed. We need to work together on a
healing strategy to assist individuals and communities in dealing with the consequences of this
sad era of our history.

No attempt at reconciliation with Aboriginal people can be complete without reference to the
sad events culminating in the death of Métis leader Louis Riel. These events cannot be undone;
however, we can and will continue to look for ways of affirming the contributions of Métis
people in Canada and of reflecting Louis Riel’s proper place in Canada’s history.

Reconciliation is an ongoing process. In renewing our partnership, we must ensure that the
mistakes which marked our past relationship are not repeated. The Government of Canada
recognizes that policies that sought to assimilate Aboriginal people, women and men, were not
the way to build a strong country. We must instead continue to find ways in which Aboriginal
people can participate fully in the economic, political, cultural and social life of Canada in a
manner which preserves and enhances the collective identities of Aboriginal communities, and
allows them to evolve and flourish in the future. Working together to achieve our shared goals
will benefit all Canadians, Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal alike.

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10/08/2000


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