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JULY ยท 1 go3 but would encourage him most emphatically to lay the foundations of future prosperity in these primary, original, and wealth-producng occupations. ''Right here let me say that the seeming difference in opinion as to whether the negro shall receive a college or industrial education is a mere quibble. All those who are engaged in the work of education at the south realize that he needs both parts of education just as any other people do. But for the masses emphasis should be placed upon industrial education. ''We need not go far to find examples of colored men who have themselves practiced what I am emphasizing. Right here in Boston, in the persons of Mr. I. H. Lewis, and of scores of others, we find colored men and women who have begun at the bottom in some industry, trade or commercial enterprise, and who have worked themselves up to a place where they are independent, and have the respect of all classes of their fellow citizens. ''We complain a great deal, and rightly, about the treatment accorded us on the railroads of public carriers in some parts of our country. We should remember, however, that the securities that largely govern these public carriers are on the market, and are as easily bought by black men as by white, and that the men who own the securities in the Tong run control the policy of the public carriers. ''In the last analysis the world cares very little what you or I know, but it does care a great deal about what you and I do. An educated man on the streets, with his hands in his pockets, is not worth one whit more than an ignorant man with his hands in his pockets. It is the application of our knowledge in such a way as to help the world onward materially, mentally and spiritually, that is in the long run recognized and applauded by mankind. EDUCATION AND WORK ''Every colored parent in Boston should see to it that his child secures the very best, and completest, education; and with that education, a sense of the dignity and beauty of labor, a conviction of the disgrace of idleness, together with the mastery of some special trade or calling, by which at all times, if necessary, a living may be earned. Mere literary education whether of a black, or of a white 235