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Street Names - And What They Mean



Gradorean

Evan and Grace Clarke and their 9 children settled on the shores of Pumicestone Passage in 1922 where they built Caloundra's first Ice works, founding a year-round commercial fishing industry and providing much needed ice for Caloundra's first residents and holiday makers.

They provided free of charge, essential cold-room storage to the Australian Army garrison stationed in Caloundra during the Second World War - the first line of defence of Australia.

The Clarke Family helped form many of Caloundra's early community services including the Ambulance, School of Arts and Methodist Church.

In 75 years the Clarke Family have participated in over 50 rescues on the Caloundra Bar. As a result of these actions they have been awarded a citation from the Humane Society of Australia.

Today Evan and Grace Clarke's descendants continue in the family tradition, fishing Caloundra's ocean beaches in the winter for export mullet.

Gradorean was the name of a boat used by the Clarke family in their fishing business. It was derived from the names of three of their children, Grace, Doris and Jean.

(Gradorean Street & Grace Court)

Archibald Meston (1851 - 1924)
Archibald Meston (1851 - 1924) journalist and administrator, was born in Aberdeenshire, Scotland. His family migrated to Australia in 1859 and farmed at Ulmarra on the Clarence River in New South Wales.

Meston became Manager of a Brisbane River sugar plantation in 1874. He contributed articles to the Queenslander and from 1876 to 1881 he edited the Ipswich Observer, which became the Brisbane Daily Observer in 1879. He represented Rosewood in the Legislative Assembly (1878 - 1882), and after spending six months of 1881 as editor of the Townsville Herald he was cane-farming on the Barron River for eight years.

He was commissioned in 1894 to prepare plans for improving conditions for Aborigines which became the basis for the "Aboriginal Protection Act of 1895" and the following year he was appointed Protector of Aborigines for South Queensland.

Meston published a Geographic History of Queensland (1895) as a text-book for Queensland schools. For a time he was director of the Queensland Government Tourist Bureau in Sydney. He died in Brisbane in 1924.

( Meston Place)

The Corso Pelican Waters
In late 1946 Portion 27, which was owned by the Estate of Herbert Hemming and managed by the Public Curator, came on the market. Portion 27 was originally owned by William Landsborough as his " Loch Lamerough" estate, and constitutes the present Pelican Waters development. World War II had ended and Roy Henzell obtained the Agency for this large block. People were starting to settle in Caloundra after discharge from the Armed Forces.

Roy Henzell tried to interest a number of people in purchasing this block and subdividing it but they either did not have sufficient capital or could not see its potential. He realised it would be a good investment and the family - Roy, his wife Maisie, their children Joan (Ford) and Bevan - all put capital into buying it. It has remained a family development ever since.

(The Corso)

Friedrich Wilhelm Ludwig Leichhardt (1813 - 1848)
Scholar, naturalist and explorer was born in Prussia. At universities of Berlin and Gottingen he first studied philosophy and languages before switching to medical science. In England later, he studied medical and natural science at the Royal College of Surgeons and the British Museum. In Paris, he studied further natural science at the Jardin des Plantes, while at the same time spending much time on field work both in England and European countries.

From 1842 he began moving through the country, studying and collecting specimens for European museums. During 1842 to 1844 he continued his field studies in the Moreton Bay district, visiting the Pumicestone Passage in company with his hosts the Archer brothers of " Durundur" Station, on the Stanley River

In 1844 Leichhardt set off from Moreton Bay with a private exploratory expedition to cross the continent to Port Essington. This remarkable performance he achieved with the loss of only one life, that of John Gilbert the ornithologist who was speared by Aboriginals on the Gulf of Carpentaria at the river subsequently named after him. The journey of 3000 miles (5000 km) through unknown territory was accomplished in fifteen months. On returning to Sydney by sea he was given a hero's welcome.

Using the money which had been subscribed by the public as a gift for him, he organised a second extensive expedition which ended in miserable failure after proceeding only 500 miles (800 km). Re-organised, he set off once again, planning to cross the continent from the Darling Downs to the west coast. This party completely disappeared and their fate has never been satisfactorily solved.

( Ludwig Place)

Ningi
Oystering came naturally with such an abundance of supply in the Pumicestone Passage in the early 1800's. In September 1843, Ludwig Leichhardt with his hosts John and David Archer spent a couple of days with their friends the Nynga Nynga Aboriginal people at Durval (the Ningi Aboriginal people at Toorbul) feasting on oysters and crabs to which Leichhardt gave high praise. Ningi is the Aboriginal word for oysters.

While there is not the abundance of oysters in the Passage today that existed last century, the records show there are thirty-four areas currently under license as oyster banks in it's waters.

The majority of these are worked only in a desultory fashion although there are good stocks of oysters on the more suitable banks. Most of the licensed banks have been in existence for a great number of years - in some instances since the early 1900's.

( Ningi Court)

H.M.S. Investigator
Matthew Flinders (1774 - 1814) navigator, hydrographer and scientist was born at Donington, Lincolnshire. He joined the navy in 1789 and in 1791 served under William Bligh as midshipman on a voyage to Tahiti.

In 1795 he first came to Australia in H.M.S. Reliance in which ship George Bass was the surgeon. With Bass he made several hazardous voyages in open boats, exploring the south coast of New South Wales. In 1798, again in company with Bass he circumnavigated Tasmania, proving it to be an island. In the same sloop, the " Norfolk" the next year he followed the coastline northwards visiting Moreton Bay, including the Pumicestone Passage.

He was given the command of the "H.M.S. Investigator" in 1801 and for the next two years sailed around the continent of Australia, charting its coastline.

Returning to England as a passenger in H.M.S. Porpoise in 1803, he was wrecked on an island east of the Great Barrier Reef but managed to navigate a cutter more than 700 miles (1120 km) back to Port Jackson. He set off once again for England in a leaky schooner of 29 tons (26 tonnes), the "Cumberland" and in putting in to the French island of Mauritius found war had broken out again between Britain and France, was arrested and held prisoner there for six years.

Arriving back in England in 1810 in bad health, he began his monumental task of writing the account of his voyages, which was published on 18 July 1814, the day before he died

( Investigator Place)

Durundur
David, John and Alexander Archer were three of the nine Archer brothers who spent some time in Australia. They were sons of William Archer of Perth, Scotland, who moved to Norway in 1825.

David (1816 - 1900) came to Australia in 1834. John (1814 - 1857) was a later arrival, having first gone to sea. David and John, with another brother Thomas, took up Durundur Station on the Stanley River.

Alexander (1828 - 1890) did not come to Australia until 1852, spending all his life here with the Bank of New South Wales. Both he and his wife lost their lives in the wreck of the Quetta in February 1890.

The Archer brothers played very prominent roles in Queensland development; pioneering the pastoral industry; in politics Archibald was M.L.A. and held portfolios of Treasury and Education, Thomas was Agent-General for Queensland in London and Colin obtained a much wider distinction as ship-designer and builder, having built the "Fram" the ship in which Nansen explored the North Polar Sea in 1893.

( Durundur Street & Archer Court)


Toorbul Street & Godwin Place
Fishing, both professional and amateur has always been a feature of life on the Passage. So bountiful were the supplies in the early days of settlement, several fish canneries were established at different times and in different places between the late 1890s and 1914.

The first of these were at " Toorbul Point", a business owned by Messrs. James Clark and Reginald Hockings. This was sold to Charles Godwin in 1899 and shifted to the northern tip of Bribie soon afterwards. While it was still in operation, Maloney Bros. erected a second cannery right alongside it in 1906. The following year Godwin sold out to Lionel Landsborough, son of William Landsborough.

In 1910 it changed ownership again having been bought by Mrs Sarah Balls, who shifted it back to the southern end of the island, opposite to where it was originally established. It was operating there until 1914.

Toorbul came from the name of a locality group of the Yugarabul nation. This group inhabited the area covered by the present cities of Brisbane and Redcliffe, the Shire of Pine Rivers and part of Caloundra Shire. From Yugarabul "tar/au" meaning loose stones and "bul" meaning a population group or subdivision. Toorbul Point marked Yugarabul nation's limit of their territory

The idea of Toorbul Point being used as a port appears a quite few times in the mid 1800s. First Dr Lang, then Alexander Archer, later William Landsborough and then during the Second World War by the United States Defense Forces who investigated Toorbul Point as a possible site for a port because they were frustrated by the tedious four-hour journey from the entrance to Moreton Bay to the wharves in Brisbane.

( Toorbul Street)

Dr Thomas Lane Bancroft (1860 - 1933)
Dr Thomas Lane Bancroft (1860 - 1933) scientist was born at Nottingham, England, the son of Joseph Bancroft, a leading scientist of his time who took an active part in all medical and scientific associations in Queensland. The Bancroft family migrated to Queensland in 1864.

Thomas Lane Bancroft was educated at the Brisbane Grammar School and the University of Edinburgh where he graduated in medicine in 1883. As his father had done before him, he combined a medical practice with scientific research and gained international recognition for his studies of the Queensland lungfish.

He also discovered that a species of mosquito was the carrier of dengue fever. Another interest was in the hybridization of plants developing new kinds of peach, grape, castor-oil plant and cotton.

He died at Wallaville, Queensland in 1933.

( Bancroft Street)

Norfolk
In 1799 Matthew Flinders was given command of the Sloop " Norfolk" and instructed to explore the Glasshouse and Hervey Bays, two large openings to the north, which were the only two entrances known at the time.

Flinders, writing in his journal commented:

"I had some hope of finding a considerable river discharging itself at one of these openings, and of being able by its means to penetrate further into the interior of the country than had hitherto been effected."

After exploring the southern part of Moreton Bay, he returned to the Pumicestone River and while a leak in the " Norfolk" was being repaired on the beach we now know as White Patch, Flinders and a few of his men took a boat up the Passage and into Glass Mountain Creek, from where they walked to the Glasshouses, climbing Beerburrum but failing to climb Tibrogargan.

( Norfolk Court)

Richard Parsons, Thomas Pamphlett, John Finnegan
Richard Parsons, Thomas Pamphlet and John Finnegan were ticket-of-leave convicts who were travelling south from Sydney to the Illawarra district to buy cedar, when they were caught in a storm and eventually wrecked on the shore of Moreton Island in 1823.

They spent five months travelling by canoe up the Brisbane River (un-named at the time), and then to Bribie Island where the Aborigines supplied them with fish and showed them how to dig for, treat and cook fern roots.

After a time, anxious to get back to Sydney, they set off north again, but Pamphlet and Finnegan returned and Parsons kept going. Two months later in November of the year of 1823, Pamphlet and Finnegan were rescued by John Oxley in the "Mermaid". Parsons had to wait another year for his rescue, until Oxley returned.

( Parsons Court)


Waterhen
In the late 1930's, Thomas Maloney and his brother owned a flat bottom barge called the " Waterhen". It was made flat bottom, so it could float over the shallow sandbanks in the Pumicestone Passage. It took shellgrit to Brisbane to a wharf at Newstead. The shellgrit was bagged and sent to poultry farmers on the Darling Downs.

The " Waterhen" returned with cargo for Caloundra - potatoes, petrol, flour, beer, kerosene, sugar, tea, furniture, timber and iron. All goods were changed about 3 times to other barges because part of Pumicestone Passage is so shallow that the barge couldn't pass. The shallow part is called the Skids - still today.

( Waterhen Place)

Matthew Flinders (1774 - 1814)
Matthew Flinders (1774 - 1814) navigator, hydrographer and scientist was born at Donington, Lincolnshire. He joined the nay in 1789 and in 1791 served under William Bligh as midshipman on a voyage to Tahiti.

In 1795 he first came to Australia in H.M.S. Reliance in which ship George Bass was the surgeon. In 1798, again in company with Bass he circumnavigated Tasmania, proving it to be an island. In the same sloop, the " Norfolk" the next year he followed the coastline northwards visiting Moreton Bay, including the Pumicestone Passage.

On 12 th July 1799, Flinders dropped anchor at what he called " Glasshouse Bay" and on 16 th July 1799 he entered Pumicestone Passage and called it " Pumicestone River" because of all the pumicestone floating on the edge. He climbed Mount Beerburrum on 26 th July 1799. Flinders and his party camped at the foot of Mt Tibrogargan, where the railway bridge crosses the creek.

Arriving back in England in 1810 in bad health, he began his monumental task of writing the account of his voyages, which was published on 18 July 1814, the day before he died

( Matthew Crescent)

H.M.S. Reliance
In 1795 Matthew Flinders (1774 - 1814) first came to Australia in H.M.S. Reliance in which ship George Bass was the surgeon. With Bass he made several hazardous voyages in open boats, exploring the south coast of New South Wales. In 1798, again in company with Bass he circumnavigated Tasmania, proving it to be an island. In the sloop the " Norfolk" the next year he followed the coastline northwards visiting Moreton Bay, including Pumicestone Passage.

On 12 th July 1799, Flinders dropped anchor at what he called " Glasshouse Bay" and on 16 th July 1799 he entered Pumicestone Passage and called it " Pumicestone River" because of all the pumicestone floating on the edge. He climbed Mount Beerburrum on 26 th July 1799. Flinders and his party camped at the foot of Mt Tibrogargan, where the railway bridge crosses the creek.

(Reliance Close)

Edmund Lander
The Unoccupied Crown Lands Occupation Act 1860 had opened the area to pastoral runs as well as for timber-getting, and the first person to take advantage of this was a migrant from Devonshire, Edmund Lander. He grazed cattle at Kedron Brook in Brisbane.

Edmund Lander also grazed his cattle on Bribie Island, presumably by holding Occupational Licences on Vacant Crown Land. There is a spot south of the Lighthouse Reserve on the Island known as Landers' Camp. The cattle were swum across the Passage or walked across at low tide in the more shallow sections. Descendants of Edmund Lander still have cattle on Bribie. Now they are moved in trucks.

( Lander Street)

Thomas Maloney (1889 - 1976)
Boatman, oysterman and fish-cannery owner was born in Normanton, North Queensland in 1889. As a teenager Thomas Maloney first came to the Pumicestone Passage to live in a bark hut on the northern tip of Bribie Island in 1905.

Through most of his life, he traded for the family fish-cannery business of Maloney Bros., which operated between Brisbane and Caloundra. In the early days he was dealing in crabs, fish and oysters. In the later years his barge left Caloundra to return to Brisbane laden with bags of shell-grit from his shell-grit leases Caloundra's beaches.

Tom Maloney was much loved by the local children to whom he gave rides on his horse-drawn sled between the beach and his old truck.

His retirement was spent in Caloundra where he died in September 1976.

( Maloney Street)

Campbellville
In 1881, James Campbell & Sons established a sawmill by Coochin Creek, about four miles (6 km) upstream from where it enters the Passage. This grew into a settlement named " Campbellville".

From the beginning of the mill's operation, until early 1883, the timber was transported from Campbellville to Brisbane by sailing cutter, then a paddle steamer named "Mavis", which had been especially built for James Campbell's use in the Passage operation of their business, began trading on Australia Day in 1883 and remained in service until the mill closed down in 1890.

( Campbellville Street) REJECTED. Campbelleville Circuit accepted.

Koopa
From 1860 to 1890 there was notable commercial expansion in Queensland. As this was an era of water transport, the Passage was admirably suitable for development and acquired its first settlers and industry. But then, in 1890 the railway arrived at Landsborough, and water transport for Pumicestone Passage industry was reduced to the minimal.

For some years there ensued another period of almost complete isolation from the world until the Brisbane Tug Company, which began operations in 1903 and subsequently became active throughout Moreton Bay, gave a kiss of life to the southern end of Bribie, especially when the popular ferry ship the " Koopa" began its service to the island in 1911.

With the improvement of road and the growing popularity of motor transport, the boat ferries lost custom to private car owners who crossed the Passage by barge from the mainland at Toorbul Point to Bongaree. That too was made obsolete when the bridge was built in 1963.

( Koopa Street) REJECTED Koopa Place accepted for Glasshouse Bay

John Dunmore Lang (1799 - 1878)
The Reverend John Dunmore Lang (1799 - 1878) Presbyterian clergyman, politician and writer was responsible for the presence of the missionaries on the outskirts of the convict colony. When he was in England in 1837 he had arranged with the Home Government for the establishment of a mission to the Aborigines at Moreton Bay. There was already present a German Protestant Chaplain, the Rev. Johann Christian Simon Handt, who was also a missionary to the Aborigines. This new group came under the recently formed Presbyterian Synod of New South Wales of which Dr Lang was Moderator.

The mission comprised of clerical and lay members, who with few exceptions had been trained as missionaries in Germany. Tragically, one of the clerks, who had also been trained in medicine, died of typhus fever at the quarantine station before arrival in Sydney. That left the complement of the staff as one minister of religion, a bricklayer, cabinet-maker, blacksmith, farmer, weaver, tailor, two shoemakers and a gardener, all but the last three having wives. Eleven children accompanied them.
( Lang Street)

Agincourt & Tripcony
Thomas Martin Tripcony (1828 - 1896) sailor, shearer, oysterman was born in Cornwall, England. He served in the Royal Navy during the Crimean War and later joined the merchant marine. When serving in the ship " Agincourt" he arrived in Melbourne in 1859, obtained a discharge and went to the goldfields, but failed to make a fortune. He next tried shearing and worked his way to Brisbane where he was employed on the construction of the Normal School.

In Brisbane in 1861, he married Catherine Buchanan (1835 - 1903) and went to work for Captain Whish on his sugar plantation on the Caboolture River plain. From Caboolture he moved on to Deception Bay, lime-burning for James Campbell and Sons, and moved from there to Toorbul Point and finally to Cowiebank, where he obtained an oyster licence and took up land and settled for the remainder of his life - oystering. He died in 1896.

( Agincourt Street & Tripcony Court)

Christopher Eipper (1813 - 1894)

The Reverend Christopher Eipper was one of the missionaries from the German Mission at Zion's Hill near Brisbane Town who were the first to attempt to convert the "pagans" of the Passage to Christianity. These were the first missionaries to have an acquaintance with the Passage blacks.

This community settled just a few kilometres to the north of early Brisbane in 1838. The clerical missionary the Rev. Christopher Eipper who had been educated at the Missionary College at Basle in Switzerland and ordained by the German and French Protestant clergy in London, has left very detailed, sympathetic accounts of the Aborigines, through which we can see the early influences on them of European culture.

Much of what Rev. Christopher Eipper recounted about the Aborigines was very general in the sense that it did not relate to specific tribes and some of it contradicted with what had been written earlier which may simply have been reflecting the changes that had already taken place in their own culture after fifteen years of association with whites.

( Eipper Street)

Cowiebank
Thomas Tripcony (1828 - 1896), sailor, shearer, oysterman was born in Cornwall, England. He served in the Royal Navy during the Crimean War and later joined the merchant marine. Whilst serving on the ship "Agincourt" he arrived in Melbourne in 1859, obtained a discharge and went to the goldfields, but failed to make a fortune. He next tried shearing and worked his way to Brisbane where he was employed on the construction of the normal school.

He moved from place to place between Brisbane and Deception Bay and from there to "Cowiebank". Thomas settled on Pumice Stone Channel, on the northern side of the mouth of Glass Mountain Creek in 1861. He named his home " Cowie Bank" after a farm of the same name in Stirlingshire, Scotland, the birthplace of his wife. Where he obtained an oyster licence and took up land and settled for the remainder of his life - oystering. He died in 1896.

( Cowiebank Place)

Amity
John Oxley (1785 - 1828) surveyor-general and explorer was born at Kirkham, Yorkshire. He joined the navy in 1799 and sailed to Australia late in 1801 in "H.M.S. Buffalo" as master's mate, arriving in October 1802, where he was first engaged in coastal survey work.

He retired from the navy in 1811 and took up his appointment as Surveyor-General of New South Wales in 1812. In 1823 he sailed as far north as Port Curtis and on his return voyage put into Moreton Bay and with the assistance of the ticket-of-leave castaway John Finnegan, discovered the Brisbane River. On his return to Sydney he recommended Moreton Bay as a suitable site for another penal settlement.

In 1824 John Oxley arrived in Moreton Bay in the Government brig "Amity" to select the site for the Penal Settlement. The Surveyor-General Oxley laid out the first Penal Settlement at Redcliffe.

( Amity Court)

Firefly
William Landsborough (1825 - 1886) was born at Stevenston, near Saltcoats, Ayshire into a well-known family of naturalists. He migrated to New South Wales in 1841 to join two of his brothers in New England. By 1850 he had become an expert bushman, taking up his own property with a partner, which he did not hesitate to leave for Australia's gold rush.

In 1854 his years of exploration began, with his own station on the Burnett as base. One of his co-explorers was Nat Buchanan, the first of the famous overlanders. He was continually exploring for new pastures which he would take up on lease for himself and his friends. With this experience behind him it was only natural that he should be chosen to lead an expedition in search of the lost explorers Burke and Wills in 1861.

Landsborough left Moreton Bay in August 1861 in the " Firefly"accompanied by the " Victoria". The "Firefly" was wrecked on a reef near Cape York with the loss of five of the thirty horses on board, but was re-floated by the " Victoria" and repaired, and the party landed safely at the mouth of the Albert River.

Landsborough's first sortie out in search of the lost explorers was responsible for discovering the Barkly Tableland. Not having sighted Burke and Wills they returned to the depot, obtained more stores and set off again. Travelling south-east this time, following the Flinders River upstream, then the Thomson, Barcoo and Warrego Rivers downstream until they reached the first settlement where they heard of the fate of the lost explorers. They had crossed their tracks without having been aware of it.

( Firefly Street)


Edmund Lockyer (1784 - 1860)
The story of timber-getting in the environs of the Passage begins with Major Edmund Lockyer, one of the explorers of the Brisbane River. In 1825, when tracing the course of the Brisbane River, was on its tributary the Stanley River just over the D'Aguilar Range to the west of the Pumice Stone River. (as the passage was called at that time) He judged the timbers in the hinterland as:

"From no accurate survey having been taken or good examination of Moreton Bay, a great part of it is still unknown. There are many rivers running in to it that no one has ever entered. Consequently their capabilities and resources are yet to be learnt, through from what is known of the 'Brisbane, the Blind River' and the 'Pumice Stone' they are abound with the finest timber that has hitherto been found in New South Wales.

( Lockyer Place)

Kalowendha
"Place of Beech Trees"

From the local Kabi language " kal/owen" meaning beech tree and " dha" to denote place. The genetic name is Gmelina leichhardtii many of which still remain throughout the estate. Local white settlers have adapted the native term " kal/owen/ dha" for this area which has settled phonetically on the currently pronounced "Caloundra".

( Kalowendha Avenue)

Hereward Leighton Kesteven (1881 - 1964)
A doctor of medicine (B.Sc. D.Sc. M.B. Ch.M. M.D.), and son of a doctor of medicine was born in Fiji. As a young man he worked in the Australian Museum in Sydney for two years and through his life-long interest in conchology and other zoological sciences, he retained his association with that museum throughout his long life.

He collected mollusca in the Pumicestone Passage in 1902 and the collection he made there, of 373 species, is in the Australian Museum.

He practiced medicine in country districts in New South Wales and Queensland but never lost his interest in natural history, while at the same time developing various other interests such as economics, politics and industrial medicine. During World War Two he worked in Army camps all over Australia.

He died in Brighton, Queensland in 1964, having previously been given an appropriate memorial in having his name given to a genus " Herewardia".

( Kesteven Street) ( Hereward Street)

Sawmill at Golden Beach
In 1948, Ronald & Dorothy Parkinson and Chris & Mary Christensen (nee Parkinson, built a sawmill at Golden Beach for the manufacture of pineapple cases. They built the small mill opposite Military Jetty on the south side of Lamerough Creek. Roy Henzell Snr allowed them to use the land free of charge.

In the first six months they made and sold 500 pineapple cases to a farmer at Palmwoods. They remained at the site for approximately one year before moving the mill out to Little Mountain. Chris & Mary Christensen sold their interest in the mill in 1950. Ron was to be later joined by his brother Charles in the Little Mountain Mill.


Coonowrin Street
John Mathew M.A., B.D. an academic anthropologist, who lived in Kabi territory as a teenage youth for more than six consecutive years. He visited the tribe periodically afterwards and spoke their language as a "second mother-tongue" knew many Aboriginal tribes and made a lifelong study of their lore and their laws. He sets the boundaries of the Kabi tribe from the Burrum River in the north to the middle of the Passage in the south, and from the coast over the coastal ranges to the Burnett River in the west, including Fraser Island.

From the Kabi community came the word Coonowrin meaning "kin/na" the nape of the neck and "war/uin" meaning crooked. "Crook-neck."

Coonowrin is the name of one of the volcanic remnants which together make up the Glasshouse Mountains.

( Coonowrin Street is part of Caloundra. There is a Mathew Crescent in Pelican Waters).

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