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The flight planning requirements contained in this Section are based, in part, on the CAR, Part VI, General Operating and Flight Rules.

The pilot-in-command of an aircraft shall, before commencing a flight, be familiar with the available information that is appropriate to the intended flight (CAR 602.71).

The pilot-in-command of an aircraft shall, before commencing a flight, be familiar with the available weather information that is appropriate to the intended flight (CAR 602.72). Pilots should refer to the MET Section for aviation weather information.

The pilot briefing service is provided by FICs to assist pilots at the pre-flight planning stage and for information updates while en route. Pilot requests for initial briefings while airborne are not encouraged because this practice leads to frequency congestion.

The telephone numbers of NAV CANADA FICs are found in the General and Aerodrome/Facility Directory sections of the CFS or WAS. Long distance phone calls can be made to an FIC toll-free at 1-866-WXBRIEF (1-866-992-7433). A call to this number is routed to the FIC that serves the area from which the call originates. A call to 1-866-GOMÉTÉO (1-866-466-3836) is routed to the Québec FIC for the provision of bilingual service. A specific FIC may be contacted at the number shown in the CFS or WAS, General section, Flight Planning (FLT PLN) sub-section. Collect calls from pilots are accepted at all FICs.

When requesting a briefing, identify yourself as a pilot; provide the aircraft identification and the following:

  1. type of flight (VFR, IFR, CVFR, composite) planned;
  2. type of aircraft;
  3. aerodrome of departure and estimated time of departure (ETD);
  4. destination aerodrome and estimated elapsed time (EET);
  5. planned cruising level(s) or altitude(s);
  6. route to be flown and estimated times of arrival at, and departure from, any intermediate aerodrome(s);
  7. alternate aerodrome, if appropriate;
  8. type of meteorological information requested, i.e. whether a briefing or consultation; and
  9. information already on hand, if any.

The flight service specialist requires this information to tailor the briefing to the planned flight and the needs of the pilot. The flight service specialist may omit information normally provided in a briefing if the pilot has indicated having the data on hand or requested the briefing be limited to specific information. The flight service specialist will terminate the briefing by soliciting flight plan information not already obtained at the beginning of the briefing and PIREP, if appropriate. (See RAC 3.16 for details concerning flight plan content).

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Aeronautical information (NOTAM, RSC, CRFI, flow control, etc.) is available at ATS units and at certain operations offices. Aeronautical information is routinely provided by FICs during a pilot briefing and upon request in FISE. Telephone numbers and RCO frequencies for all FICs are listed in the CFS and the WAS.

Canadian domestic NOTAMs are disseminated via AFTN and stored electronically on a NOTAM file concept. There are three categories of NOTAM files: National NOTAMs, FIR NOTAMs and aerodrome NOTAMs. Before commencing a flight, pilots must ensure that each NOTAM file category has been reviewed, in order to be familiar with all NOTAMs appropriate to the intended flight (see MAP 5.0 for details).

Canadian domestic and international NOTAMs have different distribution lists. Only Canadian domestic NOTAMs that concern international flights are sent out internationally (in the ICAO format). All pertinent Canadian domestic NOTAM files must be consulted to obtain NOTAM information for flights within Canada (see MAP 5.2 for details).

Flight plans and flight itineraries may also be filed via DUATS.

The CARs require that aircraft be operated within the weight and balance limitations specified by the manufacturer. Actual passenger weights should be used, but where these are not available, the following average passenger weights, which include clothing and carry-on baggage, may be used.

NOTE: These average weights are derived from a Statistics Canada Survey, Canadian Community Health Survey Cycle 2.1, 2003.

Summer   Winter
200 lbs or 90.7 kg MALES (12 yrs up) 206 lbs or 93.4 kg
165 lbs or 74.8 kg FEMALES (12 yrs up) 171 lbs or 77.5 kg
75 lbs or 34 kg CHILDREN (2-11 yrs) 75 lbs or 34kg
30 lbs or 13.6 kg *INFANTS (0 to less than 2 yrs) 30 lbs or 13.6 kg

* Add where infants exceed 10% of Adults

NOTES

1: On any flight identified as carrying a number of passengers whose weights, including carry-on baggage, will exceed the company-approved standard weights, or the average weights published in the AIP, the actual weight of such passengers are to be used. The actual weights are to be obtained as described in 3.5.1.

2: Where no carry-on baggage is permitted or involved, the AIP average weights for males and females may be reduced by 13 lbs or 5.9 kg.

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3.5.1 Actual Weights

Actual weights are best determined by weighing each passenger, including exterior clothing and carry-on baggage.

Where weight scales are not available, and company-approved standard weights or AIP average weights are not appropriate, passenger weights may be determined by:

(a) asking each passenger for their weight; and

(b) adding on an allowance for clothing*; and

(c) adding on 13 lbs or 5.9 kg per passenger, except infants, if carry-on baggage is permitted.

*NOTE: Clothing is not normally worn during personal weight measurements. An allowance of at least 8 lbs or 3.6 kg in summer, or 14 lbs or 6.4 kg in winter, is to be used.

3.5.2 Fuel and Oil Weights

Fuel and oil weights were obtained from the Canadian Government Standards Bureau specifications. It should be remembered that the capacity of tanks is often expressed in U.S. gallons. The standard weights of fuel and oil are:

Temperature

-40ºC

-20ºC

0ºC

15ºC

30ºC

Fuel

LBS per

LBS per

LBS per

LBS per

LBS per

litre imp.
gal
U.S.
gal.
litre imp.
gal
U.S.
gal.
litre imp.
gal
U.S.
gal.
litre imp.
gal
U.S.
gal.
litre imp.
gal
U.S.
gal.
Aviation Kerosene CAN 2-3, 23-M81 (JET A, JET A-1, JET A-2) and Arctic Diesel 1.93 8.80 7.32 1.90 8.65 7.19 1.87 8.50 7.09 1.85 8.39 7.00 1.83 8.27 6.91
Aviation Wide Cut Fuel CAN 2-3, 23-M80 {F-40 (JP4) and JET B 1.85 8.38 6.99 1.82 8.24 6.88 1.79 8.11 6.78 1.77 8.01 6.68 1.74 7.92 6.60
Aviation Gasoline All Grades CAN 2-3, 25-M82 (AV GAS) 1.69 7.68 6.41 1.65 7.50 6.26 1.62 7.33 6.12 1.59 7.20 6.01 1.56 7.07 5.90

 

Temperature

-10ºC

0ºC

10ºC

20ºC

30ºC

Lubricating oil

LBS per

LBS per

LBS per

LBS per

LBS per

litre imp.
gal
U.S.
gal.
litre imp.
gal
U.S.
gal.
litre imp.
gal
U.S.
gal.
litre imp.
gal
U.S.
gal.
litre imp.
gal
U.S.
gal.
Piston Engine 65
Grade
1.98 8.98 7.46 1.97 8.92 7.46 1.95 8.85 7.38 1.94 8.78 7.33 1.92 8.71  
120 Grade 2.01 9.10 7.59 1.99 9.03 7.54 1.97 8.96 7.46 1.96 8.88 7.41 1.94    

Turbine engine lubricating oil densities at 15˚C

3cS oils 2.09 lbs/litre; 9.4 lbs/imp. gal.; 7.92 lbs/U.S. gal.

5cS oils 2.15 lbs/litre; 10.1 lbs/imp. gal.; 8.14 lbs/U.S. gal.

NOTE: The weights shown are for the maximum density of the various temperatures. The actual fuel weight for specific conditions can usually be obtained from the dealer supplying the fuel.

Conversion factors for litres to Imperial gallons and kilograms to pounds are found in GEN 1.9.2.

3.6.1 When Required

CAR 602.73 states that no pilot-in-command shall operate an aircraft in VFR flight unless a VFR flight plan or a VFR flight itinerary has been filed, except where the flight is conducted within 25 NM of the departure aerodrome.

No pilot-in-command shall operate an aircraft in IFR flight unless an IFR flight plan has been filed. A pilot-in-command may file an IFR flight itinerary instead of an IFR flight plan where:

  1. the flight is conducted, in part or in whole, outside controlled airspace; or
  2. facilities are inadequate to permit the communication of flight plan information to an ATC unit, an FSS or a CARS.

Notwithstanding any of the requirements mentioned above, pilots are required to file a flight plan when operating between Canada and a foreign state.

3.6.2 Filing (CAR 602.75)

602.75

  1. A flight plan shall be filed with an air traffic control unit, a flight service station or a community aerodrome radio station.
  2. A flight itinerary shall be filed with a responsible person, an air traffic control unit, a flight service station or a community aerodrome radio station. v
  3. A flight plan or flight itinerary, shall be filed by
    1. sending, delivering or otherwise communicating the flight plan or flight itinerary or the information contained therein; and
    2. receiving acknowledgement that the flight plan or flight itinerary or the information contained therein has been received.

A “responsible person” means an individual who has agreed with the person who has filed a flight itinerary to ensure that, if the aircraft is overdue, the following are notified in the manner prescribed in this Section:

  1. an ATC unit, an FSS or a CARS; or
  2. an RCC.

NOTES:

  1. The notification requires the flight itinerary information.
  2. The expression flight service station used in the regulation includes a FIC. Flight plan information should be filed with an FIC, where complete briefing information is available. An IFR flight plan should be submitted to the flight planning section of an ACC.

The timely filing of IFR flight plans or flight itineraries is essential to allow ATC personnel time to extract and record the relevant content, correlate these new data with available information on other traffic under control, coordinate as necessary, and determine how the flight may best be integrated with the other traffic.

Accordingly, in order to assist ATS in improving the service provided and to allow sufficient time for input into the ATS data processing system, pilots are encouraged to file IFR flight plans or flight itineraries as early as practicable, preferably at least 30 min prior to their proposed departure time. Pilots are expected to depart in accordance with the flight plan ETD. Some delay could be experienced if an IFR clearance is required less than 30 min after filing. It is also important that ATS be informed of the circumstances if commencement of an IFR flight is to be delayed. IFR flight itineraries are limited to one departure from and one entry into controlled airspace; multiple exits and entries into controlled airspace will not be accepted by ATS.

3.6.3 Flight Plan Requirements – Flights Between Canada and a Foreign State

A VFR or IFR flight plan must be filed prior to conducting any flight between Canada and a foreign state. If the flight is to any country other than the USA, an ICAO flight plan must be filed.

The ADCUS notification is accepted on flight plans to the USA. The notification includes the pilot’s name and the number of U.S. and non-U.S. citizens as a remark in item 18 of the flight plan. Such a request is limited to the recording of the notification into the flight plan to be transmitted to the USA after the aircraft departure.

The FAA unit receiving the flight plan will forward the ADCUS notification to U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP). However, the relay process starts only after the aircraft departure and may often not provide sufficient advance notice. It is solely the pilot’s responsibility to make sure that U.S. Customs is properly notified. Failure to do so may subject the pilot to a penalty, even though an ADCUS remark has been filed (See FAL 2.3.2 for additional details).

The ADCUS notification is not acceptable on a flight plan from the USA to Canada. Pilots must make their own customs arrangements before flying into Canada.

3.6.4 Opening a VFR Flight Plan or Flight Itinerary

A VFR flight plan or flight itinerary should normally be opened with a TWR, an FSS or a CARS upon departure to activate the alerting service. The pilot is responsible for extending or cancelling the flight plan or flight itinerary if the flight is delayed or cancelled. If an extension or cancellation to a filed flight plan or flight itinerary has not been received by the proposed time of departure, the responsible ATS unit will activate the flight plan or flight itinerary, using the ETD as the actual time of departure (ATD), unless it is known that the aircraft has not departed.

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Since control and alerting services are based primarily on information provided by the pilot, it is essential that modifications to flight plans and flight itineraries be communicated to an ATC unit, an FIC, a CARS or, as applicable, a responsible person concerned, as soon as practicable.

3.7.1 VFR Flight Plan or Flight Itinerary

CAR 602.76(3) and (4) specify that a pilot “shall notify as soon as practicable an air traffic control unit, a flight service station, a community aerodrome radio station or the responsible person,” of any change to:

  1. the route of flight,
  2. the duration of the flight; or
  3. the destination aerodrome.

3.7.2 IFR Flight Plan or Flight Itinerary

CAR 602.76(1) and (2) specify that a pilot shall notify as soon as practicable an air traffic control unit, a flight service station, a community aerodrome radio station or a responsible person, as the case may be, of any change to:

  1. the cruising altitude or cruising flight level;
  2. the route of flight;
  3. the destination aerodrome;
  4. when in controlled airspace:
    1. the true airspeed at the cruising altitude or cruising level where the change intended is 5% or more of the TAS specified in the IFR flight plan; or
    2. the Mach number, where the change intended is 0.01 or more of the Mach number that has been included in the ATC clearance.

Where the flight is being conducted in controlled airspace, the pilot shall receive ATC clearance before making the intended change.

A composite flight plan or flight itinerary may be filed that describes part(s) of the route as operating under VFR and part(s) of the route as operating under IFR. All rules governing VFR or IFR apply to that portion of the route of flight. A composite flight plan or flight itinerary shall not be filed for an aircraft that will enter airspace controlled by the FAA, including CDA delegated to the FAA, as composite data cannot be correctly processed between NAV CANADA and FAA systems.

A pilot who files IFR for the first part of a flight and VFR for the next part will be cleared by ATC to the point within controlled airspace at which the IFR part of the flight ends. A pilot who files VFR for the first part of a flight and IFR for the next part is expected to contact the appropriate ATC unit for clearance prior to approaching the point where the IFR portion of the flight commences. If direct contact with an ATC unit is not possible, the pilot may request ATC clearance through an FIC. It is important that the flight continue under VFR conditions until appropriate IFR clearance within controlled airspace is issued by ATC and acknowledged by the pilot.

CAR 602.145 outlines the requirements when operating into or within the Air Defence Identification Zone (ADIZ). In order to ensure that the Air Traffic System (ATS) is aware that VFR flights will be operating into or within the ADIZ, ATS requires that pilots file a Defence Flight Plan or Flight Itinerary as depicted at RAC 3.16.2.

CAR 602.145 ADIZ states:

602.145 ADIZ

(1) This Section applies in respect of aircraft before entering into and while operating within the ADIZ, the dimensions of which are specified in the Designated Airspace Handbook.

(2) Every flight plan or flight itinerary required to be filed pursuant to this Section shall be filed with an air traffic control unit, a flight service station or a community aerodrome radio station.

(3) The pilot-in-command of an aircraft whose point of departure within the ADIZ or last point of departure before entering the ADIZ has facilities for the transmission of flight plan or flight itinerary information shall:

(a) before takeoff, file a defence flight plan or defence flight itinerary;

(b) in the case of a VFR aircraft where the point of departure is outside the ADIZ,

(i) indicate in the flight plan or flight itinerary the estimated time and point of ADIZ entry, and

(ii) as soon as possible after takeoff, communicate by radio to an air traffic control unit, a flight service station or a community aerodrome radio station a position report of the aircraft’s location, altitude, aerodrome of departure and estimated time and point of ADIZ entry; and

(c) in the case of a VFR aircraft where the point of departure is within the ADIZ, as soon as possible after takeoff, communicate by radio to an air traffic control unit, a flight service station or a community aerodrome radio station a position report of the aircraft’s location, altitude and aerodrome of departure.

(4) The pilot-in-command of an aircraft whose point of departure within the ADIZ or last point of departure before entering the ADIZ does not have facilities for the transmission of flight plan or flight itinerary information shall:

(a) as soon as possible after takeoff, file by radio communication a flight plan or flight itinerary; and

(b) in the case of a VFR aircraft, indicate in the flight plan or flight itinerary the estimated time and point of ADIZ entry, if applicable.

(5) The pilot-in-command of a VFR aircraft shall revise the estimated time and point of ADIZ entry and inform an air traffic control unit, a flight service station or a community aerodrome radio station, when the aircraft is not expected to arrive:

(a) within plus or minus five minutes of the estimated time at:

(i) a reporting point,

(ii) the point of ADIZ entry, or

(iii) the point of destination within the ADIZ; or

(b) within 20 nautical miles of:

(i) the estimated point of ADIZ entry, or

(ii) the centre line of the route of flight indicated in the flight plan or flight itinerary.

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Intermediate stops may not be included in a single IFR flight plan. Except for transborder flights, a single VFR flight plan or an IFR or VFR flight itinerary including one or more intermediate stops en route may be filed provided:

(a) for VFR flight plans, the stop will be of short duration (for purposes such as boarding passengers, and refuelling);

(b) for IFR flight itineraries, the stop will be in uncontrolled airspace; and

(c) each intermediate stop is indicated by repeating the name of the stopping point and its duration in the route Section of the flight plan/itinerary. Record the duration of the stopover in hours and minutes with four consecutive digits. Example: CYXU 0045  CYXU. You may include a phone number for the stopover in the “Remark” section of the flight plan or flight itinerary, if available, as this may be useful in case of search and rescue.

Transborder Canada / U.S.A. flight plans shall be filed to the customs point of entry only to avoid unnecessary alerting service procedures from being initiated due to delays created in the process of clearing customs. Flight plans for locations beyond the customs point of entry may be filed with an FAA Flight Service Station.

When intermediate stops are planned, the “Estimated Elapsed Time” must be calculated as the total time to the final destination, including the duration of the intermediate stop(s). It should be noted that Search and Rescue (SAR) action would only be initiated at the specified SAR time or, in the event that a SAR time is not indicated, 60 minutes for a flight plan and 24 hours for a flight itinerary after the ETA at the final destination. Pilots wishing SAR action based on every leg of a flight should file one flight plan or flight itinerary for each stop.

3.10.1 Consecutive IFR Flight Plans

Consecutive IFR flight plans may be filed at the initial point of departure providing the following points are adhered to:

(a) initial point of departure and enroute stops must be in Canada except that one flight plan will be accepted for a departure point within United States controlled airspace;

(b) the sequence of stops will fall within one 24-hour period;

(c) the flight planning unit must be provided with at least the following items of information for each stage of the flight:

(i) point of departure,

(ii) altitude,

(iii) route,

(iv) destination,

(v) proposed time of departure,

(vi) estimated elapsed time,

(vii) alternate,

(viii) fuel on board, and, if required,

(A) TAS,

(B) number of persons on board, and

(C) where an arrival report will be filed.

A cross country instrument training flight is one in which there are no intermediate stops and one or more instrument approaches are made enroute. For example, an aircraft departs Airport A, completes a practice approach at Airport B and either lands at destination Airport C or returns to land at Airport A.

The following apply:

(a) A single flight plan is filed.

(b) Those enroute locations at which instrument approaches and overshoots are requested shall be listed in the “Other Information” portion of the flight plan form, together with the estimated period of time to carry out each approach (i.e., REQ NDB RWY 32 AT B-15 MIN.).

(c) The estimated elapsed time (EET)of the flight plan form is NOT to include the estimated time to carry out approaches at the enroute locations.

(d) ATC will normally clear the aircraft to final destination.

(e) If it is not practicable to clear the aircraft to final destination or to assign an operationally suitable altitude with the initial clearance, a time or specific location for the aircraft to expect further clearance to the destination or to a higher altitude will be issued with the initial clearance.

(f) When an enroute approach clearance is requested, a missed approach clearance will be issued to the aircraft prior to the commencement of the approach.

(g) If traffic does not permit an approach, holding instructions will be issued to the aircraft if requested by the pilot.

In order to comply with CAR 602.77, an arrival report for a flight plan shall be submitted to an ATC unit, an FSS (or an FIC) or a CARS as soon as practicable after landing but not later than:

  1. the SAR time specified in the flight plan; or
  2. where no SAR time is specified in the flight plan, one hour after the last reported ETA.

A pilot who terminates a flight itinerary shall ensure that an arrival report is filed with an ATC unit, an FSS (or an FIC), a CARS or, where the flight itinerary was filed with a responsible person, the responsible person as soon as practicable after landing but not later than:

  1. the SAR time specified in the flight itinerary; or
  2. where no SAR time was specified in the flight itinerary, 24 hours after the last reported ETA.

A pilot who terminates an IFR flight at an aerodrome where there is an operating ATC unit, FSS or where RAAS is provided, is not required to file an arrival report unless requested to do so by the appropriate ATC unit or FSS.

When submitting an arrival report, the pilot should clearly indicate that he/she was operating on a flight plan or flight itinerary and wishes it to be closed. Failure to close a flight plan or flight itinerary will initiate SAR action. It should not be assumed that ATS personnel will automatically file arrival reports for VFR flights at locations served by control towers and FSSs or an RCO. Toll-free calls, as outlined in the CFS, may be made to an ATS facility for this purpose.

3.12.1 Arrival Report

CAR 602.78 specifies that the contents of an arrival report for a flight plan or flight itinerary, which are listed in the CFS, shall include:

(a) the aircraft registration mark, flight number or radio call sign;

(b) the type of flight plan or flight itinerary;

(c) the departure aerodrome;

(d) the arrival aerodrome, and

(e) the date and time of arrival.

3.12.2 Closing of a Flight Plan or Flight Itinerary Prior to Landing

A pilot, who conducts a flight in respect of which a flight plan or flight itinerary has been filed with an air traffic control unit, flight service station, or community aerodrome radio station, has the option of closing the flight plan or flight itinerary with an air traffic control unit, flight service station, or community aerodrome radio station prior to landing.

The closure of a flight plan or flight itinerary prior to landing is considered as filing an arrival report, and as such, it will result in the termination of all alerting services with respect to search and rescue notification.

When flying IFR, use of the phrase “Cancelling IFR” results in ATC discontinuing the provision of IFR separation, but it does not automatically close the flight plan or itinerary. Therefore, alerting service with regards to search and rescue notification is still active and is based upon the information submitted in the original flight plan or itinerary. Because the pilot is now flying in accordance with Visual Flight Rules (VFR), the flight plan or itinerary must either be closed prior to landing, or an arrival report filed after landing, with an air traffic control unit, a flight service station or a community aerodrome radio station.

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The fuel requirements contained in this Section do not apply to gliders, balloons or ultra-light aeroplanes. (CAR 602.88)

In addition to VFR and IFR fuel requirements, every aircraft shall carry an amount of fuel that is sufficient to provide for

(a) taxiing and foreseeable delays prior to takeoff;

(b) meteorological conditions;

(c) foreseeable air traffic routings and traffic delays;

(d) landing at a suitable aerodrome in the event of loss of cabin pressurization or, in the case of a multi-engined aircraft, failure of any engine, at the most critical point during the flight; and

(e) any other foreseeable conditions that could delay the landing of the aircraft.

3.13.1 VFR Flight

An aircraft operated in VFR flight shall carry an amount of fuel that is sufficient to allow the aircraft

(a) in the case of an aircraft other than a helicopter,

(i) when operated during the day, to fly to the destination aerodrome and then to fly for 30 minutes at normal cruising speed, or

(ii) when operated at night, to fly to the destination aerodrome and then to fly for 45 minutes at normal cruising speed, or

(b) in the case of a helicopter, to fly to the destination aerodrome and then to fly for 20 min. at normal cruising speed.

3.13.2 IFR Flight

An aircraft operated in IFR flight shall carry an amount of fuel that is sufficient to allow the aircraft

(a) in the case of a propeller-driven aeroplane,

(i) where an alternate aerodrome is specified in the flight plan or flight itinerary, to fly to and execute an approach and a missed approach at the destination aerodrome, to fly to and land at the alternate aerodrome, and then to fly for a period of 45 minutes, or

(ii) where an alternate aerodrome is not specified in the flight plan or flight itinerary, to fly to and execute an approach and a missed approach at the destination aerodrome and then to fly for a period of 45 minutes; or

(b) in the case of a turbojet powered aeroplane or
a helicopter,

(i) where an alternate aerodrome is specified in the flight plan or flight itinerary, to fly to and execute an approach and a missed approach at the destination aerodrome, to fly to and land at the alternate aerodrome, and then to fly for a period of 30 minutes, or

(ii) where an alternate aerodrome is not specified in the flight plan or flight itinerary, to fly to and execute an approach and a missed approach at the destination aerodrome and then to fly for a period of 30 minutes.

Except as otherwise authorized by the Minister in an air operator certificate (AOC) or in a private operator certificate, no pilot-in-command shall operate an aircraft in IFR flight unless the IFR flight plan or IFR flight itinerary that has been filed for the flight includes an alternate aerodrome having a landing area suitable for use by that aircraft. No pilot-in-command of an aircraft shall include an alternate aerodrome in an IFR flight plan or IFR flight itinerary unless available weather information indicates that the ceiling and ground visibility at the alternate aerodrome will, at the expected time of arrival, be at or above the alternate aerodrome weather minima criteria specified in the CAP. (CARs 602.122 and 602.123)

Aerodrome forecasts (TAF) that contain the terms BECMG, TEMPO or PROB may be used to determine the weather suitability of an aerodrome as an alternate, provided that:

(a) where conditions are forecast to improve, the forecast BECMG condition shall be considered to be applicable as of the end of the BECMG time period, and these conditions shall not be below the published alternate minima requirements for that aerodrome;

(b) where conditions are forecast to deteriorate, the forecast BECMG condition shall be considered to be applicable as of the start of the BECMG time period, and these conditions shall not be below the published alternate minima requirements for that aerodrome;

(c) the forecast TEMPO condition shall not be below the published alternate minima requirements for that aerodrome; and

(d) the forecast PROB condition shall not be below the appropriate landing minima for that aerodrome.

3.14.1 Alternate Aerodrome Weather Minima Requirements

Authorized weather minima for alternate aerodromes are to be determined using the information presented in the tables below. The “Alternate Weather Minima Requirements” table presented in the CAP GEN Section (reproduced below), supersedes all alternate weather minima published on the aerodrome charts in the CAP. The minima derived for an alternate aerodrome shall be consistent with aircraft performance, navigation-equipment limitations, functioning

navigation aids, type of weather forecast and runway to be used.

Pilots can take credit for a GNSS approach at an alternate aerodrome, provided that the planned destination aerodrome is served by a functioning traditional approach aid; and the pilot verifies that the integrity, provided by RAIM or WAAS (wide area augmentation system), and that is required for a lateral navigation (LNAV) approach, is expected to be available at the planned alternate aerodrome at the expected time of arrival at the alternate, as explained in COM 3.16.12. Note that if credit is taken for a GNSS approach at an alternate aerodrome to fulfill the legal requirements for flight planning, no part of the approach at the destination may rely on GNSS. Otherwise, when determining alternate aerodrome weather minima requirements, the pilot shall only take credit for functioning traditional aids at that aerodrome.

If credit is being taken for a GNSS-based approach at the alternate, the published LNAV minima are the lowest landing limits for which credit may be taken when determining alternate weather minima requirements. No credit may be taken for lateral navigation / vertical navigation (LNAV/VNAV) or localizer performance with vertical guidance (LPV) minima.

Pilots may take credit for the use of GNSS in lieu of traditional ground-based NAVAIDs at a filed alternate aerodrome, as per COM 3.16.9 and COM 3.16.12.

ALTERNATE WEATHER MINIMA REQUIREMENTS

FACILITIES AVAILABLE AT SUITABLE ALTERNATE WEATHER REQUIREMENTS
TWO OR MORE USABLE PRECISION APPROACHES, each providing straight-in minima to separate
suitable runways
400-1 or 200-1/2 above lowest usable HAT and visibility, whichever is greater.
ONE USABLE
PRECISION APPROACH
600-2* or 300-1 above the lowest usable HAT and visibility, whichever is greater.
NON-PRECISION
ONLY AVAILABLE
800-2* or 300-1 above the lowest usable HAT/HAA and visibility, whichever is greater.
NO IFR
APPROACH AVAILABLE
Forecast weather must be no lower than 500 ft above a minimum IFR altitude that will permit a VFR approach
and landing.
FOR HELICOPTERS, where instrument approach procedures are available Ceiling 200 ft above the minima for the approach to be flown, and visibility at least 1 SM, but never less than the minimum visibility for the approach to
be flown.

*600-2 and 800-2, as appropriate, are considered to be STANDARD ALTERNATE MINIMA.

Should the selected alternate weather requirements meet the standard minima, then the following minima are also authorized:

STANDARD ALTERNATE MINIMA

IF STANDARD IS APPLICABLE, THEN THE FOLLOWING MINIMA ARE ALSO AUTHORIZED

CEILING

VISIBILITY

CEILING

VISIBILITY

600

2

700
800

1 1/2
1

800

2

900
1000

1 1/2
1

NOTES 1: These requirements are predicated upon the aerodrome having a TAF available.
 
2: Aerodromes served with an AERODROME ADVISORY forecast may qualify as an alternate, provided the forecast weather is no lower than 500 ft above the lowest usable HAT/HAA and the visibility is not less than 3 mi.
 
3: Aerodromes served with a GRAPHIC AREA FORECAST (GFA) may qualify as an alternate, provided the forecast weather contains:

(a) no cloud lower than 1 000 ft above the lowest usable HAT/HAA;

(b) no cumulonimbus; and

(c) a visibility that is not less than 3 mi.

 
4: Ceiling minima are calculated by reference to the procedure HAA or HAT. Ceiling values in aviation forecasts are established in 100–ft increments. Up to 20 ft, use the lower 100–ft increment; above 20 ft, use the next higher 100–ft increment:

Examples:

HAA 620 ft

= ceiling value of 600 ft;

HAA 621 ft

= ceiling value of 700 ft;

HAT 420 ft

= ceiling value of 400 ft;

HAT 421 ft

= ceiling value of 500 ft;.

5: Calculated visibilities should not exceed 3 mi.

Caution: All heights specified in a GFA are ASL, unless otherwise indicated.

The emphasis of these criteria is placed upon the availability of the lowest usable landing HAT/HAA and visibility for an aerodrome. In determining the lowest usable landing HAT/HAA and visibility, the pilot should consider:

(a) the operational availability of the ground navigational equipment by consulting NOTAM;

(b) the compatibility of the aircraft equipment with the ground navigational equipment;

(c) the forecast surface wind conditions could dictate the landing runway and associated approach minima;

(d) the operational applicability of terms BECMG, TEMPO and PROB within the forecast (see RAC 3.14);

(e) all heights mentioned within a GFA are ASL heights, unless otherwise indicated, and the terrain elevation must be applied in order to determine the lowest forecast ceiling at a particular location; and

(f) alternate minima values determined from a previous flight operation may not be applicable to a subsequent flight operation.

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3.15.1 General

The flight plan form is to be used for Canadian flight plans or flight itineraries and ICAO flight plans. Completion of the form is simply a matter of inserting the requested information in the appropriate boxes. The white boxes relate to required information for both Canadian flight plans/ flight itineraries and ICAO flight plans. The shaded boxes indicate the information which is applicable only to Canadian flight plans / flight itineraries.

NOTE: A Canadian flight plan is used for flights from Canada to the United States

3.15.2 Canadian

A Canadian flight plan / flight itinerary shall contain such information as is specified in the Canada Flight Supplement (CFS). This includes:

  • aircraft identification
  • flight rules
  • type of flight
  • number (if more than one)
  • type of aircraft
  • wake turbulence category
  • equipment
  • departure aerodrome
  • time of departure (UTC) – proposed/actual
  • cruising speed
  • altitude/level
  • route
  • destination aerodrome
  • estimated elapsed time enroute (EET)
  • SAR time (not required in an ICAO flight plan)
  • alternate aerodrome(s)
  • other information (ADCUS if applicable)
  • endurance (flight time in hours and minutes)
  • total number of persons on board
  • category of emergency locator transmitter (not required in an ICAO flight plan)
  • survival equipment (type, jackets, dinghies)
  • aircraft colour and markings
  • remarks (regarding other survival equipment)
  • arrival report – where it will be filed (not required in an ICAO flight plan)
  • name and number or address of person or company to be notified if SAR action initiated (not required in an ICAO flight plan)
  • pilot’s name
  • pilot’s licence number (Canadian pilot licence only – not required in an ICAO flight plan)

3.15.3 ICAO

Flight plans for international flights originating in, or entering Canada shall be filed in the ICAO format, as specified in ICAO Doc 4444-RAC/501/ Mil GPH 270 DOD FLIGHT INFO PUBLICATION.

For the purpose of flight planning, flights between Canada and the Continental United States are not classed as “international flights”.

3.15.4 Instructions for Completing the Form

(a) Adhere closely to the prescribed formats and manner of specifying data.

Commence inserting data in the first space provided. Where excess space is available, leave unused spaces blank.

All times should be indicated in UTC, using four digits.

Indicate all EETs using four digits (hours and minutes) for flight plans.

NOTE: Because EETs on a flight itinerary may include days as well as hours and minutes, insert the EET using six digits, if required.

The shaded area preceding Item 3 is to be completed by ATS and COM services, unless the responsibility for originating flight plan messages has been delegated.

NOTE: The term “aerodrome,” where used in the flight plan, is intended to also cover sites other than aerodromes that may be used by certain types of aircraft, e.g. helicopters or balloons.

(b) Instructions for insertion of ATS data:

(i) Complete Items 7 to 18 as indicated hereunder.

(ii) Complete Item 19 as well to facilitate alerting of SAR services.

NOTE: Item numbers on the form are not consecutive, as they correspond to Field Type numbers in ATS messages.

(iii) Use location indicators listed in Canadian aeronautical information publications (defined in CAR 300.01), in ICAO Doc 7910—Location Indicators, and in FAA Order 7350.7—Location Identifiers.

3.16.1 Item 7: Aircraft Identification (maximum 7 characters)

Canadian:

Normally, this consists of the aircraft registration letters or the company designator followed by the flight number.
Examples are:

• Aircraft Registration:

• Operating Agency and Flight Number:

• Tactical Call Sign:

N123B, CGABC, 4XGUC, etc.

ACA123, KLM672, etc.

BRUNO12, SWIFT45, RED1, etc.

ICAO:

(a) The registration marking of the aircraft (e.g., E1AKO, 4XBCD, N2567GA), when:

(i) in radiotelephony, the call sign to be used by the aircraft will consist of this identification alone (e.g., OOTEK), or preceded by the ICAO telephony designator for the aircraft operating agency (e.g., SABENA OOTEK);

(ii) the aircraft is not equipped with radio; or

(b) the ICAO designator for the aircraft operating agency followed by the flight identification (e.g., KLM511, NGA213, JTR25) when in radiotelephony the call sign to be used by the aircraft will consist of the ICAO telephony designator for the operating agency followed by the flight identification (e.g., KLM511).

NOTE: Provisions for the use of radiotelephony call signs are contained in Annex 10, Volume II, Chapter 5. ICAO designators and telephony designators for aircraft operating agencies are contained in Doc 8585, Designators for Aircraft Operating Agencies, Aeronautical Authorities and Services.

3.16.2 Item 8: Flight Rules and Type of Flight

(a) Flight Rules (1 character) (ICAO and Canadian): INSERT one of the following letters to denote the category of flight rules with which the pilot intends to comply:

I for IFR
V for VFR
Y for IFR first, then VFR
Z for VFR first, then IFR

If “Y” or “Z” is filed, specify, in the route Section of the flight plan, the point(s) where a change in flight rules is planned. Similarly, where there is more than one change in the type of flight rules, the code to be used is to reflect the first rule, i.e., use “Z” for VFR/IFR/VFR.

(b) Type of Flight (2 characters):

INSERT one of the following letters to denote the type of flight when so required by the appropriate ATS authority:

First character (Canadian only – as applicable):
C for Controlled VFR
D for Defence Flight Plan
E for Defence Flight Itinerary
F for Flight Itinerary
 
Second character (ICAO, as applicable):
S for Scheduled Air Service
N for Non-scheduled Air Transport Operation
G for General Aviation
M for Military
X for other than the preceding categories

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3.16.3 Item 9: Number and Type of Aircraft and Wake Turbulence Category

(a) Number of Aircraft (1 or 2 characters): Insert the number of aircraft, if more than one.

(b) Type of Aircraft (2 to 4 characters): Insert the appropriate ICAO aircraft type designator. If no such designator has been assigned, or in the case of formation flights comprising more than one type, insert “ZZZZ” and specify in Item 18 the number(s) and type(s) of aircraft preceded by “TYP/”.

(c) ICAO Wake Turbulence Category (1 character):

/H – HEAVY, to indicate an aircraft type with a maximum certificated takeoff mass of 136 000 kg (300 000 lbs) or more.
/M – MEDIUM, to indicate an aircraft type with a maximum certificated takeoff mass of less than 136 000 kg (300 000 lbs), but more than 7 000 kg (15 500 lbs).
/L – LIGHT, to indicate an aircraft type with a maximum certificated takeoff mass of 7 000 kg (15 500 lbs) or less.

3.16.4 Item 10: Equipment (Canadian and ICAO)

The communication (COM), navigation (NAV), approach aid and SSR equipment on board and its serviceability must be inserted by adding the appropriate suffixes. The first suffixes will denote the COM, NAV and approach aid equipment, followed by an oblique stroke, and another suffix to denote the SSR equipment:

(a) COM, NAV and Approach Aid Equipment:

INSERT one letter as follows: N if no COM, NAV or approach aid equipment for the route to be flown is carried, or the equipment is unserviceable; or S if standard COM, NAV and approach aid equipment for the route to be flown is available and serviceable (see Note 1)

AND/OR INSERT one or more of the following letters to indicate the COM, NAV and approach aid equipment available and serviceable:

A (Not allocated)) M (Not allocated)
B (Not allocated) O VOR
C LORAN C P (Not allocated)
D DME Q (Not allocated)
E (Not allocated) R RNP type certification (Note 4)
F ADF T TACAN
G GNSS (Note 5) U UHF
H HF RTF V VHF
I INS W RVSM
J Data Link (Note 3) X MNPS Certification
K MLS Y CMNPS Certification (Note 6)
L ILS Z Other equipment carried (Note 2)
NOTES 1: Standard equipment is considered to be VHF, ADF, VOR and ILS.
 
2: If the letter “Z” is used, specify in Item 18 the other equipment carried, preceded by COM/ and/or NAV/, as appropriate.
 
3: If the letter “J” is used, specify in Item 18 the equipment carried, preceded by DAT/ followed by one or more letters, as appropriate.
 
4: Inclusion of the letter “R” indicates that an aircraft meets the RNP (e.g. RNPC airspace) type prescribed for the route segment(s), route(s) and/or area concerned.
 
5: When using the letter “G” on an IFR flight plan, the GPS receiver must be approved in accordance with the requirements specified in TSO C-129 (Class A1, A2, B1, B2, C1 or C2), installed and approved in accordance with the appropriate sections of the Airworthiness Manual, and operated in accordance with the approved flight manual or flight manual supplement. Pilots are encouraged to use the letter “G” on VFR flight plans when using GPS to assist VFR navigation. TSO C-129 receivers are not mandatory for
VFR flights.
 
6: The letter “Y” is only used if an
aircraft operates:

(a) wholly within Canada or from Canada to the United States and is CMNPS–certified (Canadian Flight Plan); or
(b) on international routes from or to Canada (other than in (a) above) and is CMNPS–certified but not NAT MNPS–
certified (ICAO Flight Plan).

 
7: Pilots filing /G in conjunction with /I, /X, /Y, /W or /R should be aware that as a result of technical limitations, only one equipment suffix letter is displayed to controllers. As all these other equipment suffixes have priority over /G for display, controllers might not be aware of the GPS capability. In such cases, controllers may apply greater separation than is necessary in non-radar airspace. If desired, pilots can advise controllers verbally of their GPS capability to ensure
optimum separation.
 
8: The letter “W” is not to be used for formation flights, regardless of the RVSM status of aircraft within the flight.

(b) SSR Equipment (Canadian and ICAO):

INSERT one or two of the following to describe the serviceable SSR equipment carried:
N Nil
A Transponder—Mode A (4 digits–4096 codes)
C Transponder—Mode A (4 digits–4096 codes) and Mode C
X Transponder—Mode S without both aircraft identification and pressure-altitude transmission
P Transponder—Mode S, including pressure-altitude transmission, but not aircraft identification transmission
I Transponder—Mode S, including aircraft identification transmission, but not pressure-altitude transmission
S Transponder—Mode S, including both pressure-altitude and aircraft identification transmission.
D Automatic dependent surveillance (ADS) capability

Examples:

A/C

Equipment

Write

Cessna 172 (C172)

VHF only and no transponder

V/N

Cessna 414 (C414)

VHF, VOR, ADF, ILS, DME, HF; Mode A and C transponder

SDH/C

Boeing 747 (B747)

VHF, VOR, ADF, ILS, DME, HF; and Mode S transponder, including pressure-altitude transmission, but not aircraft identification transmission

SDH/P

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3.16.5 Item13: Departure Aerodrome and Time

Departure Aerodrome: (maximum 4 characters)

INSERT the four-character location indicator of the departure aerodrome, or if no location indicator has been assigned, INSERT ZZZZ and specify in Item 18 the name of the aerodrome/location, preceded by DEP/.

Time: (maximum 4 characters)

Indicate the hour and minutes in UTC.

NOTE: Pilots may file a flight plan or flight itinerary up to 24 hr in advance of the departure time.

3.16.6 Item 15: Cruising Speed, Altitude/Level and Route

Canadian:

NOTES:

  1. On designated airways and air routes, IFR flights may be operated at the published MEA/MOCA except that in winter, when air temperatures may be much lower than those of the ICAO Standard Atmosphere (ISA), aircraft should be operated at an altitude which is at least 1 000 feet higher than the published MEA/MOCA (see RAC 8.5 and RAC 9.5).
  2. Preferred IFR routes, published in the CFS – PLANNING Section, have been established to aid in the efficient and orderly management of air traffic between selected aerodromes. Pilots are encouraged to file these routes.

Canadian and ICAO:

INSERT

  • the first cruising speed as described in (a),
  • the first cruising level as described in (b), and
  • the route description as described in (c).
  1. Cruising Speed (maximum 5 characters)

    INSERT the True Airspeed for the first or the whole cruising portion of the flight, in terms of:

    Kilometres per hour, (ICAO only) expressed as “K” followed by 4 figures (e.g., K0830),

    or, Mach number, when so prescribed by the appropriate ATS authority, to the nearest hundredth of unit Mach, expressed as “M” followed by 3 figures (e.g., M082).

  2. Cruising Level (maximum 5 characters):

    INSERT the planned cruising level for the first or the whole portion of the route to be flown, in terms of:

    Flight Level, expressed as “F” followed by 3 figures (e.g., F085; F330),

    or, Standard Metric Level in tens of metres, (ICAO only) expressed as “S” followed by 4 figures (e.g., S1130), when so prescribed by the appropriate ATS authorities,

    or, Altitude in hundreds of feet, expressed as “A” followed by 3 figures (e.g., A045; A100), or, Altitude in tens of metres, (ICAO only) expressed as “M” followed by 4 figures (e.g., M0840),

    or, for uncontrolled VFR flights, the letters “VFR” (ICAO only).

  3. Route (including Changes of Speed, Level and/or Flight Rules)

Flights Along Designated ATS Routes:

INSERT if the departure aerodrome is located on, or connected to the ATS route, the designator of the first ATS route (e.g., if departure aerodrome is Ottawa: V300 ULAMO, etc.)

or, if the departure aerodrome is not on, or connected to the ATS route, (ICAO only) the letters DCT, followed by the joining point of the first ATS route, followed by the designator of the ATS route.

or, (Canadian only) by filing the joining point of the first ATS route, followed by the designator of the ATS route (e.g., if departure aerodrome is Ottawa: YSH R76 YGK).

INSERT each point at which either a change of speed or level, a change of ATS route, and/or a change of flight rules is planned, (e.g., YMX/N0200A170 IFR)

NOTE: When a transition is planned between a lower and an upper ATS route and the routes are oriented in the same direction, the point of transition need not be inserted.

FOLLOWED IN EACH CASE

by the designator of the next ATS route segment, even if the same as the previous one, (e.g., if departure aerodrome is Ottawa: V300 ULAMO, etc.)

or, (ICAO only) by DCT , if the flight to the next point is outside a designated route, unless both points are defined by geographical coordinates

or, (Canadian only) by filing the next point if it is outside a designated route (e.g., if departure aerodrome is Ottawa: V300 ULAMO 3B, etc.) Absence of DCT between points on a Canadian flight plan/itinerary indicates direct flight.

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Flights Outside Designated ATS Routes:

ICAO:

INSERT points normally not more than 30 minutes flying time or 370 km (200 NM) apart (ICAO only), including each point at which a change of speed or level, a change of track, or a change of flight rules
is planned,

or, when required by appropriate ATS authority(ies),

DEFINE (ICAO only) the track of flights operating predominantly in an east – west direction between 70˚N and 70˚S by reference to significant points formed by the intersections of half or whole degrees of latitude with meridians spaced at intervals of 10˚ of longitude. For flights operating in areas outside those latitudes the tracks shall be defined by significant points formed by the intersection of parallels of latitude with meridians normally spaced at 20˚ of longitude. The distance between significant points shall, as far as possible, not exceed one hour’s flight time. Additional significant points shall be established as deemed necessary.

(ICAO only) For flights operating predominantly in a north – south direction, define tracks by reference to significant points formed by the intersection of whole degrees of longitude with specified parallels of latitude which are spaced at 5˚.

INSERT (ICAO only) DCT between successive points unless both points are defined by geographical coordinates or by bearing and distance.

Canadian:

INSERT (Canadian only) points at which a change of speed or level, a change of track, or a change of flight rules is planned. Absence of DCT between points on a Canadian flight plan/itinerary indicates direct flight.

or, when required by appropriate ATS authority(ies),

Canadian and ICAO:

USE conventions (1) to (5) and SEPARATE each sub-item by a space.

(1) ATS ROUTE (2 to 7 characters):

The coded designator assigned to the route or route segment including, where appropriate, the coded designator assigned to the standard departure or arrival route (e.g., BCN1, B1, R14, UB10, KODAP2A).

(2) SIGNIFICANT POINT (2 to 11 characters):

The coded designator (2 to 5 characters) assigned to the point (e.g., LN, MAY, HADDY),

or, if no coded designator has been assigned, one of the following ways:

degrees only (7 characters): 2 figures describing latitude in degrees, followed by “N” (North) or “S” (South), followed by 3 figures describing longitude in degrees, followed by “E” (East) or “W” (West). Make up the correct number of figures, where necessary, by insertion of zeros,
e.g., 46N078W.

degrees and minutes (11 characters): 4 figures describing latitude in degrees, and tens and units of minutes followed by “N” (North) or “S” (South), followed by 5 figures describing longitude in degrees and tens and units of minutes, followed by “E” (East) or “W” (West). Make up the correct number of figures, where necessary, by insertion of zeros, e.g., 4620N07805W.

bearing and distance from a NAVAID: The identification of the NAVAID (normally a VOR), in the form of 2 or 3 characters, THEN the bearing from the NAVAID in the form of 3 figures giving degrees magnetic, THEN the distance from the NAVAID in the form of 3 figures expressing nautical miles. Make up the correct number of figures, where necessary, by insertion of zeros – e.g., a point 180˚ magnetic at a distance of 40 NM from VOR “DUB” should be expressed as DUB180040.

(3) CHANGE OF SPEED OR LEVEL (maximum 21 characters):

The point at which a change of speed (5% TAS or 0.01 Mach or more) or a change of level is planned, expressed exactly as in (2), followed by an oblique stroke and both the cruising speed and the cruising level, expressed exactly as in (a) and (b), without a space between them, even when only one of these quantities will be changed.

Examples:

LN/N0284A045

MAY/N0305F180

HADDY/N0420F330

4602N07805W/N0500F350

46N078W/M082F330

(4) CHANGE OF FLIGHT RULES (maximum 3 characters):

The point at which the change of flight rules is planned, expressed exactly as in (2) or (3) as appropriate, followed by a space and one of the following: VFR if from IFR to VFR IFR if from VFR to IFR

Examples:
LN VFR
LN/N0284A050 IFR (5)

(5) CRUISE CLIMB (maximum 28 characters):

The letter “C” followed by an oblique stroke; THEN the point at which cruise climb is planned to start, expressed exactly as in (2), followed by an oblique stroke; THEN the speed to be maintained during cruise climb, expressed exactly as in (a), followed by the two levels defining the layer to be occupied during cruise climb, each level expressed exactly as in (b), or the level above which cruise climb is planned followed by the letters PLUS, without a space between them.

Examples:
C/48N050W/M082F290F350
C/48N050W/M082F290PLUS
C/52N050W/M220F580F620

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3.16.7 Item16: Destination Aerodrome, Total EET, SAR Time (for flights in Canada only) and Alternate Aerodrome(s)

(a) Destination Aerodrome and Total (maximum 10 characters)

INSERT the four-character location indicator of the destination aerodrome followed by the total estimated elapsed time EET,

NOTE: in the case of a Canadian flight itinerary, as applicable, the EET may also include the number of days. The total duration of the flight itinerary shall not exceed 30 days.

or, if no location indicator has been assigned,

INSERT ZZZZ followed, without a space, by the total EET, and SPECIFY in Item 18 the name of the aerodrome, preceded by DEST/.

NOTE: For a flight plan received from an aircraft in flight, the total EET is the estimated time from the first point of the route to which the flight plan applies.

INSERT SAR time (4 digits) (maximum of 24 hr)

(b) Alternate Aerodrome(s) (4 characters)

INSERT the four-character location indicator of not more than two alternate aerodromes, separated by a space,

or, if no location indicator has been assigned to the alternate aerodrome,

INSERT ZZZZ and SPECIFY in Item 18 the name of the aerodrome/location, preceded by ALTN/.

NOTE: No alternate is required on a VFR flight plan/itinerary.

3.16.8 Item18: Other Information

INSERT 0 (zero) if no other information,

or, any other necessary information in the preferred sequence shown hereunder, in the form of the appropriate indicator followed by an oblique stroke and the information to be recorded:

EET/ Significant points or FIR boundary designators and accumulated EETs to such points or FIR boundaries, when so prescribed on the basis of regional air navigation agreements, or by the appropriate ATS authority.

Examples:
EET/CAP0745 XYZ0830
EET/EINN0204

RIF/ The route details to the revised destination aerodrome, followed by the four-character location indicator of the aerodrome. The revised route is subject to re-clearance in flight.

Examples:
RIF/DTA HEC KLAX
RIF/ESP G94 CLA APPH
RIF/LEMD

REG/ The registration markings of the aircraft, if different from the aircraft identification in Item 7.

SEL/ SELCAL code, if so prescribed by the appropriate ATS authority (e.g. SEL/ BMDL)

OPR/ Name of the operator, if not obvious from the aircraft identification in Item 7.

STS/ Reason for special handling by ATS (e.g. hospital aircraft: STS/HOSP; one engine inoperative: STS/ONE ENG INOP; medical evacuation: STS/MEDEVAC; no radio: STS/NORDO; receiver only STS/ RONLY).

TYP/ Type(s) of aircraft, preceded if necessary by number(s) of aircraft, if ZZZZ is inserted in Item 9.

PER/ Aircraft performance data, if so prescribed by the appropriate ATS authority.

COM/ Significant data related to communication equipment as required by the appropriate ATS authority (e.g., COM/UHF only).

DAT/ Data link capability (DAT/S = satellite; H = HF; V = VHF; M = Mode S)

NAV/ Significant data related to navigation equipment as required by the appropriate ATS authority (e.g. NAV/INS).

DEP/ Name of departure aerodrome, if ZZZZ is inserted in Item 13, or a four-character location indicator of the ATS unit from which supplementary flight plan data can be obtained, if AFIL is inserted in Item 13. For aerodromes not listed in relevant aeronautical information publications, insert a space, followed by the location in degrees and minutes of latitude and longitude, immediately after the name of the departure aerodrome.

DEST/ Name of destination aerodrome, if ZZZZ is inserted in Item 16. For aerodromes not listed in relevant aeronautical information publications, insert a space, followed by the location in degrees and minutes of latitude and longitude, immediately after the name of the destination aerodrome.

ALTN/ Name of alternate aerodrome(s), if ZZZZ is inserted in Item 16. For aerodromes not listed in relevant aeronautical information publications, insert a space, followed by the location in degrees and minutes of latitude and longitude, immediately after the name of the alternate aerodrome.

RALT/ Name of en-route alternate aerodrome(s).

RMK/ Any other plain language remarks when required by the appropriate ATS authority or deemed necessary, i.e. when flying from Canada to the U.S., use the term ADCUS and indicate the number of U.S. citizens, non-U.S. citizens and the pilot’s name (e.g. RMK/ADCUS 4 U.S. 2 others SRennick); (TCAS equipped—ICAO only).

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3.16.9 Item 19: Supplementary Information

Endurance:

AFTER E/

INSERT a 4-figure group giving the fuel endurance in hours and minutes.

Persons On Board:

AFTER P/

INSERT the total number of persons (passengers and crew) on board, when required by the appropriate ATS authority. INSERT TBN (to be notified) if the total number of persons is not known at the time of filing.

Emergency and Survival Equipment:

R/(RADIO)

CROSS OUT indicator U if UHF on frequency 243.0 MHz is notavailable. CROSS OUT indicator V if VHF on frequency 121.5 MHz is not available. CROSS OUT indicator E if an EmergencyLocator Transmitter (ELT) is not available. (Canadian use only) Emergency Locator Transmitter (ELT) categories should be entered in the “ELT TYPE” box on the Flight Plan /Flight Itinerary forms. These categories (types) are described in SAR 3.2.

S/(SURVIVAL EQUIPMENT)

CROSS OUT all indicators if survival equipment is not carried.

CROSS OUT indicator P if polar survival equipment is not carried.

CROSS OUT indicator D if desert survival equipment is not carried.

CROSS OUT indicator M if maritime survival equipment is not carried

CROSS OUT indicator J if jungle survival equipment is not carried.

J/(JACKETS)

CROSS OUT all indicators if life jackets are not carried.CROSS OUT indicator L if life jackets are not equipped with lights. CROSS OUT indicator F if life jackets are not equipped with fluorescent CROSS OUT indicator U or V or both (as in R/) to indicate radio capability of jackets, if any.

D/(DINGHIES (NUMBER)

CROSS OUT indicators D and C if no dinghies are carried, or INSERT number of dinghies carried; and

(CAPACITY)

INSERT total capacity, in persons, of all dinghies carried; and

(COVER)

CROSS OUT indicator C if dinghies are not covered; and

(COLOUR)

INSERT colour of dinghies if carried.

A/(AIRCRAFT COLOUR AND MARKINGS)

INSERT colour of aircraft and significant markings. Tick appropriate box for wheels, skis, etc. (Canadian use only)

N/(REMARKS)

CROSS OUT indicator N if no remarks, or INDICATE any other survival equipment carried and any other remarks regarding survival equipment.

ARRIVAL REPORT

(Canadian use only) Fill in the required information.

AIRCRAFT

(Canadian use only) Indicate the aircraft owner, person(s) or Company to be notified if search and rescue action is initiated.

C/(PILOT)

INSERT name of pilot-in-command.

INSERT pilot’s licence number (Canadian use only)

Figure 3.1 – Composite IFR/VFR/IFR Flight Itinerary

Composite IFR/VFR/IFR Flight Itinerary

Explanation of Figure 3.1 – Composite IFR/VFR/IFR Flight Itinerary

Item 7:

Aircraft identification

Item 8:

Y indicates a composite flight of IFR and VFR with the first leg IFR

F indicates a flight itinerary

G indicates a general aviation aircraft

Item 9:

Aircraft is a Beechcraft 100

Item 10:

S indicates standard COM/NAV equipment of VHF, ADF, VOR, ILS

D indicates DME equipped

/C indicates transponder Mode A (4 digits – 4096 codes) and Mode C

Item 13:

Departure aerodrome is Saskatoon at 0900

Item 15:

Speed is 170 knots

Altitude is 5 000 feet

Route is V306 to the Lumsden VOR

VFR indicates a change in flight rules to VFR at Lumsden

JQ3 indicates direct flight from Lumsden to the aerodrome at Carlyle

(5200) indicates a stopover at Carlyle in hours and minutes

Second JQ3 indicates there will be a stopover at Carlyle

VLN indicates direct flight from Carlyle to the Lumsden VOR

N0170A060IFR indicates that the altitude is changed to 6 000 feet and the next leg will be IFR (although the speed did not change, if there is a change to either speed or altitude, both have to be indicated)

Route is V306 from Lumsden to the Saskatoon VOR

Item 16:

Destination aerodrome is Saskatoon

Estimated elapsed time (EET) from takeoff to landing at Saskatoon is 2 days and 6 hours (this includes the flight time and the stopover time at Carlyle)

Search and Rescue (SAR) time of 6 hours indicates the pilot’s desire to have SAR action initi ated at 6 hours after the total EET of the trip; in other words, 2 days and 12 hours after takeoff from Saskatoon (if there is no entry in this block the SAR activation time would be 24 hours after the EET)

Alternate aerodrome is Prince Albert

Item 18:

Although no other information is provided in this example, this section is for listing any other information as previously described in RAC 3.0.

Item 19:

Flying time endurance is 5 hours There are 2 people in the aircraft (including crew)

X over U indicates there is no UHF emergency radio

Unaltered V indicates there is VHF emergency radio

Unaltered E under ELT indicates there is an emergency locator transmitter

AP under ELT TYPE indicates an automatic portable ELT

Unaltered P under POLAR indicates polar equipment is carried

Unaltered J and L indicates that life jackets with lights are carried

Xs on D and C indicate there are no dinghies

Aircraft colour and markings are self explanatory

X on N indicates there are no additional remarks on survival gear

Example indicates closure with Saskatoon tower.

Contact name and number is self explanatory

Pilot’s licence number assists SAR specialists in their search

Figure 3.2 – IFR Flight Plan (ICAO)

IFR Flight Plan (ICAO)

Figure 3.3 – VFR Flight Plan

VFR Flight Plan


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