Lex Luger vs. Yokozuna w/ Mr. Fuji for the WWE Championship

Lex Luger’s narcissistic attitude made him very unpopular with WWE fans. But that all began to change on the Fourth of July in 1993. Yokozuna held a challenge on America’s Independence Day aboard the U.S.S. Intrepid. He claimed that no one would be able to bodyslam him. Athletes from many different sports answered the call, but no one could slam the behemoth. Then, when it appeared as though America had been embarrassed on its own Independence Day, Lex Luger arrived via helicopter and shocked the world when he bodyslammed the near-600 pound monster.

It was after this amazing feat that Luger began to embrace his nationalism, and the fans started to take to him. Luger began going cross-country riding his new bus called the Lex Express. Everywhere the bus went, there were sure to be droves of Luger fans following. The final stop for the Lex Express was Auburn Hills, Michigan, for SummerSlam where Luger got what was billed as his one-and-only shot at Yokozuna’s WWE Championship.

The capacity crowd in Auburn Hills started a deafening “U-S-A” chant that got Luger off to an impressive start as he had the champion reeling. Luger then made a critical error and went for a bodyslam. Unlike on the U.S.S. Intrepid, he couldn’t get Yokozuna up. Yokozuna wore down the challenger, utilizing his massive size advantage, but Luger was able to come back. Yokozuna combated Luger’s latest offensive outburst by nailing him with the bucket his ceremonial salt is carried in, but Luger kicked out at two. Luger made a brief comeback but failed to execute the bodyslam once again. Yokozuna went for the finish with the Banzai Drop, but Luger was able to get out of the way. Luger then finally hit the bodyslam and nailed Yokozuna with a flying forearm, sending the giant out of the ring. Yokozuna was knocked out cold from the maneuver, largely due to a steel plate that was inside of Luger’s arm, and he could not make it back into the ring before the 10-count. Several other wrestlers ran to the ring and hoisted Luger up on their shoulders as ring filled with red, white and blue balloons. Luger walked away the winner, but could not walk out with the gold since the championship cannot change hands on a count-out.