University Relations
Proper Names at Rutgers
The Name of the University

1. Full, Proper Name: Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

2. Capitalization: Note that the word “The” is capitalized.

3. Punctuation:

a. “Rutgers” is followed by a comma, not a dash. 

b. When used in text, the full name of the university is followed by a comma, treating the phrase “The State University of New Jersey” as an appositive.

   
  Example: Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, is the eighth oldest institution of higher learning in the United States.
   

4. When to Use: The full name must be used the first time the name of the university appears in text. Subsequent references may use Rutgers, Rutgers University, or campus designations if appropriate, such as Rutgers–Camden. (Also see Campus Names.)

5. In Titles of Publications: For the sake of brevity, titles of publications should normally use only the word “Rutgers,” rather than the full name of the university. The university logotype (Rutgers), with or without a signature (e.g., The State University of New Jersey, School of Criminal Justice, etc.), must appear on a publication’s front cover. The full name of the university (Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey) must appear somewhere on the publication, such as the back cover or the address line. (See the Rutgers Visual Identity Manual for usage requirements and recommendations.)

6. Possessive (see also Plurals and Possessives):

a. Use an apostrophe only with the word “Rutgers.” Do not add an extra “s.”

   
  Example: Rutgers’ chess team was founded in 1768.
   

b. When used as a possessive, i.e., with an apostrophe after the “s,” the word “Rutgers’ ” is never preceded by “the.”

c. When used as an adjective, the word “Rutgers” may or may not be preceded by “the,” depending on the noun it modifies and the meaning of the sentence.

   
 

Examples: In general, Rutgers students are a loyal bunch. The Rutgers students did well.

   

Helpful Hint: When Rutgers precedes a noun, either as an adjective or as a possessive, never put a “the” before Rutgers and an apostrophe after the “s.”

Helpful Hint: If you are not sure whether “Rutgers” should be possessive in a particular usage, substitute a name that does not end in “s,” such as Yale, and see whether it makes sense or whether the substitution requires you to add an “s,” e.g., “Yale’s.”

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Old Queen’s

1. The original name of the university was Queen’s College.

2. The word “Queen’s” is possessive and requires an apostrophe before the “s.”

3. Other references where this pertains: Old Queen’s Campus, Old Queen’s Building, or simply Old Queen’s for the building. (This is despite the fact that there is a plaque on the Old Queen’s Building that does not use the apostrophe.)

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Campus Names

(Note that capitalization of “Campus” is new and results from the transformation of undergraduate education at the New Brunswick Campus.)

Busch Campus
Camden Campus
College Avenue Campus
Cook Campus
Douglass Campus
Livingston Campus (Kilmer Campus is not correct)
Newark Campus
New Brunswick Campus
Old Queen’s Campus (considered part of the College Avenue Campus)

Also used, especially on maps:
Cook/Douglass Campus (although these are considered to be two distinct campuses)

Official Titles for the Three Regional Campuses:
Rutgers–Camden
Rutgers–Newark
Rutgers–New Brunswick

Note: When typesetting, use a closed en dash between Rutgers and the city (as is used here, above). Do not use an em dash (longer) or a hyphen (shorter).

Note: Lowercase “campuses” when referring to multiple campuses.

   
  Example: Academic buildings are being renovated on the Newark and Camden campuses.
   

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School and College Names

Degree-Granting Schools and Colleges

As of July 2007, there are 27 degree-granting schools and colleges at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. (Rutgers Business School–Newark and New Brunswick is counted as three schools for this tally. See explanation below.*)

Please keep in mind that in July 2007 the number of undergraduate degree-granting colleges and schools changed to reflect the transformations in undergraduate education happening on the New Brunswick Campus. (See The New Schools in New Brunswick, below.)

Note: School names do not include “The” (cap “T”) as part of their name. You may, however, when appropriate, use “the” (lowercase “t”) to precede the name of some of the schools in text. Typical usage is noted in the left parentheses in the list below.

Note: The word "Rutgers" before the name of a school or college may or may not include an apostrophe depending on the writer’s preference. A notable exception is the Rutgers Business School–Newark and New Brunswick, which never takes the apostrophe.

   
  Examples: Rutgers’ School of Criminal Justice is based in Newark.
The professor presented his seminar at the Rutgers School of Social Work.
   

Note: When typesetting, use a closed en dash in the name of the school (as is used in the list below). Do not use an em dash (longer) or a hyphen (shorter).

Note: Capitalize “Colleges” in a list with two or more of the following five colleges: Cook College, Douglass College, Livingston College, Rutgers College, University College. Otherwise, lowercase college (or school) in a list of colleges or schools, when referring to Rutgers’ schools and colleges or those of other institutions

   
 

Examples: There was a reunion of 1980s preceptors from Cook, Douglass, Livingston, and Rutgers Colleges.
The schools of Management and Labor Relations, Social Work, and Criminal Justice jointly sponsored the conference.

   

Schools and Colleges Granting Undergraduate Degrees Only (10 units)

Camden Campus
1. (the) Camden College of Arts and Sciences
2. University College–Camden

Newark Campus
3. (the) Newark College of Arts and Sciences
4. University College–Newark
5. Rutgers Business School: Undergraduate–Newark*
6. (the) College of Nursing

New Brunswick Campus
7. (the) School of Arts and Sciences (see the New Schools in  New Brunswick, below)
8. (the) School of Environmental and Biological Sciences (see  the New Schools in New Brunswick, below)
9. Rutgers Business School: Undergraduate–New Brunswick*
10. (the) School of Engineering

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The New Schools in New Brunswick

Beginning in July 2007, two new schools were added to the list of degree-granting schools and colleges in New Brunswick. They are:

  • School of Arts and Sciences (but not School of Arts and Sciences–New Brunswick)
  • School of Environmental and Biological Sciences.

The School of Arts and Sciences is a merger of the four liberal arts colleges (Douglass College, Livingston College, Rutgers College, and University College) and thus replaces the four liberal arts colleges in the list. Students enrolled in Douglass, Livingston, Rutgers, and University Colleges prior to fall 2007 may still earn degrees from those four schools.

The School of Environmental and Biological Sciences is the new name for Cook College, and thus replaces Cook College in the list.

Note: When including all three of the university’s arts and sciences degree-granting units in a sentence or paragraph, you may parenthetically add “New Brunswick” after School of Arts and Sciences to help distinguish among the three campuses: Camden College of Arts and Sciences, Newark College of Arts and Sciences, and School of Arts and Sciences (New Brunswick).

Note: Do not say “the former Cook College” when referring to the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences. See below for preferred usage.

   
  Examples:
Cook College, now referred to as the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences, offers food science degree programs.

The School of Environmental and Biological Sciences, the renamed Cook College, offers food science degree programs.

The School of Environmental and Biological Sciences, the new name for Cook College, offers food science degree programs.
   

Schools Granting Graduate Degrees Only (11 units)

11. (the) Graduate School–Camden
12. (the) School of Law–Camden
13. (the) Graduate School–Newark
14. (the) School of Law–Newark
15. (the) School of Criminal Justice
16. (the) School of Public Affairs and Administration
17. Rutgers Business School: Graduate Programs–Newark and New Brunswick*
18. (the) Graduate School–New Brunswick
19. (the) Graduate School of Education
20. (the) Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology
21. (the) School of Social Work

Schools Granting BOTH Undergraduate and Graduate Degrees (6 units)

22. (the) School of Business–Camden
23. (the) Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy†
24. (the) Mason Gross School of the Arts
25. (the) School of Communication, Information and Library Studies
26. (the) Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy
27. (the) School of Management and Labor Relations

* Rutgers Business School–Newark and New Brunswick

“Rutgers Business School–Newark and New Brunswick” is the preferred umbrella name used in most cases to identify students, faculty, programs, etc., connected to the university’s three formal degree-granting schools that offer business programs:

Rutgers Business School: Undergraduate–Newark
Rutgers Business School: Undergraduate–New Brunswick
Rutgers Business School: Graduate Programs–Newark and New Brunswick

In general, always use “Rutgers Business School–Newark and New Brunswick.” You may use the formal nomenclature if preparing a formal report for a provost or vice president and you need to make a distinction between programs. But for general audiences use the umbrella name. To make distinctions, consider specifying “the bachelor of science program at Rutgers Business School–Newark and New Brunswick,” for example. Never use “Rutgers Business School–Newark” or “Rutgers Business School–New Brunswick.”

An explanation of the name changes that became effective in November 2001:
The umbrella name (Rutgers Business School–Newark and New Brunswick) does not appear in the degree-granting list because this name replaced the Faculty of Management, which was not a formal “school” or “degree-granting school.” The names of the three degree-granting schools changed as follows:

* The School of Business–New Brunswick became Rutgers Business School: Undergraduate–New Brunswick
* The School of Management became Rutgers Business School: Undergraduate–Newark
* The Graduate School of Management became Rutgers Business School: Graduate Programs–Newark and New Brunswick

To create a new school, subsuming the three parts, would have required submission to the state for approval, which was not done.

† Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy

This school now offers only a graduate degree: the doctor of pharmacy. However, it is considered an undergraduate school since it admits students as first-year students directly from high school into its six-year degree program. Therefore, it is listed in the “Both” category.

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Acronyms (School Name Abbreviations)

Use acronyms sparingly. The preference is to spell out school, college, center, and institute names in full and to avoid using acronyms, abbreviations, or shortened names.

Particularly when referring to the new degree-granting schools in New Brunswick and Newark, use the full names:

  • School of Arts and Sciences
  • School of Environmental and Biological Sciences
  • School of Public Affairs and Administration

In general, it is preferable to use “the school” on second reference, with distinctions made if necessary, e.g., “the psychology school.” Note that on second reference, Mason Gross is acceptable for Mason Gross School of the Arts and the Bloustein School is acceptable for the Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy.

When referring to a center or institute, it is always preferable to refer to “the center” or “the institute” on second reference. Rely on acronyms only when dealing with more than one center or institute. If you need to use the acronym in text for brevity’s sake, be sure to reference the full name at the first mention, followed by the acronym in parentheses. Acronyms are not preceded by “the.”

Note that a few schools at Rutgers have sufficiently long names that use of the acronym has become generally accepted. These include, for example, the School of Communication, Information and Library Studies (SCILS) and the Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology (GSAPP). In addition, there are a few centers and institutes that are commonly known by their acronyms, examples of which follow:

CAIT (Center for Advanced Infrastructure and Transportation)
CAIP (Center for Advanced Information Processing)
EOHSI (Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute)
IWL (Institute for Women’s Leadership)

   
 

Examples:
The Mason Gross School of the Arts is the arts conservatory of Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. Established in 1976, the school offers professional degrees in several artistic disciplines.

Catherine studied under a faculty member at the Institute for Advanced Materials and Devices. The institute was established in 2005 with a grant from the Academic Excellence Fund.

The Center for American Women and Politics (CAWP) and the Eagleton Center for Public Interest Polling (ECPIP) are parts of the Eagleton Institute of Politics. ECPIP was founded in 1971.
   
 

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