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allemande

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processional couple dance with stately, flowing steps, fashionable in 16th-century aristocratic circles; also an 18th-century figure dance. The earlier dance apparently originated in Germany but became fashionable both at the French court (whence its name, which in French means “German”) and in England, where it was called almain, or almand. The French dancing master Thoinot…


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More from Britannica on "allemande"...
19 Encyclopædia Britannica articles, from the full 32 volume encyclopedia
>allemande
processional couple dance with stately, flowing steps, fashionable in 16th-century aristocratic circles; also an 18th-century figure dance. The earlier dance apparently originated in Germany but became fashionable both at the French court (whence its name, which in French means “German”) and in England, where it was called almain, or almand. The French dancing master ...
>The French dance suite
   from the dance, Western article
At the great balls of the French court at Versailles, the minuet was the high point of the festivities, which culminated in a suite of dances. The opening branle, led by the king and his escort, was a measured circling around, one couple after another. Next came the courante, which had been toned down from its earlier rather capricious figurations. Over the years it ...
>Arbeau, Thoinot
theoretician and historian of the dance, whose Orchésographie (1588) contains carefully detailed, step-by-step descriptions of 16th-century and earlier dance forms.
>Modification and expansion of older forms
   from the music, Western article
Dance pairs of the Renaissance grew, about the middle of the 17th century, into dance suites consisting basically of four dances: allemande, courante, saraband, and gigue, with optional dances such as the gavotte, the bourrée, and the minuet sometimes inserted before the final movement. Variation forms—the chaconne (in which a set of harmonies or a bass theme is ...
>suite
in music, a group of self-contained instrumental movements of varying character, usually in the same key. During the 17th and 18th centuries, the period of its greatest importance, the suite consisted principally of dance movements. In the 19th and 20th centuries the term also referred more generally to a variety of sets of instrumental pieces, mainly in forms smaller ...

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2 Student Encyclopedia Britannica articles, specially written for elementary and high school students
Johann Sebastian Bach
   from the music, classical article
As an organist and choirmaster for Lutheran churches near his birthplace, Bach devoted his life to composing music for the church services. His incredible output marks the summit of the polyphonic, or contrapuntal, style.
Folk Dances of the United States
   from the folk dance article
Folk dancing developed in the United States during frontier days. The dances have inherited features, chiefly English, Irish, and Scottish. Many of the tunes are Irish or Scottish jigs or reels. The dances, however, bear an unmistakable American stamp. They are of four general types, as follows: